Current Drivers News and Events

Current Drivers News and Events, Drivers News Articles.
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Novice drivers talking on hand-held smartphones are more likely to run red-lights
Young novice drivers who speak into hand-held smartphones while driving are also likely to drive while under the influence of drink or drugs, according to researchers at Lero, the Science Foundation Ireland Research Centre for Software. (2021-02-23)

Families have high awareness of healthy eating but struggle to access good food
Low-income families have a high awareness of healthy diets but can't afford good quality and nutritious food, new research shows. (2021-02-23)

Music is a must for young drivers, according to Ben-Gurion U. researchers
According to the study published in APA's journal Psychomusicology: Music, Mind and Brain, 140 young adults responded to a 67-item questionnaire exploring how drivers engage with music while driving. Ironically, most of the respondents (80%) claimed it was not only ''difficult,'' but sometimes ''near impossible'' to concentrate on traffic and road conditions without music playing. And once they arrive, most of the respondents will stay in their car at their destination until the song ends. (2021-02-22)

Plant responses to climate are lagged
Plant responses to climate drivers such as temperature and precipitation may become visible only years after the actual climate event. This is a key result of new research led by the German Centre of Integrative Biodiversity Research (iDiv), the Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU) and the Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research (UFZ) published in Global Change Biology. The results indicate that climate drivers may have different effects on the survivorship, growth and reproduction of plant species than suggested by earlier studies. (2021-02-22)

An eco-route for heavy-duty vehicles could reduce fuel consumption
Semi-trucks and other heavy-duty vehicles are responsible for nearly half of road transportation carbon dioxide emissions in Europe, according to the International Council on Clean Transportation. A team of researchers in Italy has proposed a plan to reduce the emissions without compromising priorities such as delivery times. They published their approach in IEEE/CAA Journal of Automatica Sinica, a joint publication of the IEEE and the Chinese Association of Automation. (2021-02-19)

Should Uber and Lyft be electrifying more vehicles?
Increases in air pollution and greenhouse gas emissions caused by ridesourcing impact human health and the environment--what happens when companies shoulder that cost? (2021-02-19)

Online tool helps estimate COVID's true toll on sub-Saharan Africa
Although early reporting portrayed sub-Saharan Africa as being largely spared from the coronavirus pandemic, an international team led by Princeton researchers reported that determining the true impact of the novel coronavirus in sub-Saharan Africa may be complicated by a tremendous variability in risk factors and obscured by surveillance challenges. The researchers developed an interactive online tool for estimating severe coronavirus infections per country based on the impact of various risk factors, such as chronic diseases and access to healthcare. (2021-02-17)

New research reveals drivers of regionally different ozone responses to the COVID-19
Professor Ding Aijun explored global air-quality changes during COVID-19 lockdowns and regional disparities in O3 responses to emission reductions. They integrated multiple observational datasets, including global air quality monitoring network and satellite retrievals, to shed more light on the regional differences in interactions between emissions, atmospheric chemistry, and meteorological conditions. (2021-02-07)

Taking the fear out of driver education
New drivers ages 15-25 cause nearly 1/2 of the 1 million+ road deaths worldwide. A new study in Risk Analysis suggests that driver ed programs use of fear-based messaging doesn't reduce risky driving and may even lead young drivers to take more chances. (2021-02-02)

Newly licensed autistic drivers crash less than other young drivers
A collaborative study found that compared with their non-autistic peers, young autistic drivers have lower rates of moving violations and license suspensions, as well as similar to lower crash rates. (2021-01-28)

HIV treatment in Ethiopia is a 'socioeconomic challenge'
For those who are diagnosed and have begun treatment for HIV, it is standard practice to regularly monitor viral load in the blood to assess response to treatment. A study of people living with HIV in Ethiopia shows that poverty and labour mobility are linked to high viral load despite treatment, indicating treatment failure. The researchers behind the study recommend that socioeconomic conditions should be taken into account to a greater extent in low-income countries. (2021-01-25)

Scientists discover how the potentially oldest coral reefs in the Mediterranean developed
A new study from the Institut de Ciències del Mar (ICM-CSIC, Spain) and the National Oceanography Centre brings unprecedented insights into the environmental constraints and climatic events that controlled the formation of the potentially oldest coral reefs in the Mediterranean. (2021-01-21)

How to get more electric cars on the road
MIT researchers reveal the kinds of infrastructure improvements that would make the biggest difference in increasing the number of electric cars on the road, a key step toward reducing greenhouse gas emissions from transportation. (2021-01-21)

Vermont's BIPOC drivers are most likely to have a run-in with police, study shows
Examining more than 800,000 police stops in Vermont between 2014 to 2019, researchers confirm that Vermont authorities stop, ticket, arrest and search Black drivers at a rate far beyond their share of the state's total driving population. (2021-01-18)

New insights into pancreatitis
Acute Pancreatitis (AP) is one of the most common diseases around the world. Associated with a considerable risk of morbidity and even death in patients who suffer a severe form of the disease, to date there is no specific treatment for it. Now international AP experts have published a roadmap in the journal Gut (BMJ) pinpointing the two most significant thresholds in the disease that could serve as a starting point for targeting treatment strategies for this extremely painful condition. (2021-01-13)

How climate change is disrupting ecosystems
When it gets warmer, organisms rise higher from the lowlands. Swiss Researchers investigated what could happen to plant communities on alpine grasslands if grasshoppers from lower elevations settled there. (2020-12-17)

Popular European football games linked to traffic accidents in Asia
Days when high profile European football matches are played are associated with more traffic accidents in Asia than days when less popular matches are played, finds a study in the Christmas issue of The BMJ. (2020-12-16)

Nearly half of young drivers are resuming driving just weeks after sustaining a concussion
Researchers found that nearly half of adolescents who sought specialty care for a concussion were back to driving when asked approximately two weeks after the injury, even though few had returned to exercise and sports. (2020-12-15)

Positive messages encourage safer driver behavior than fear tactics
A new study has shown that films demonstrating responsible behavior could lead to young drivers taking fewer risks on the road than if they only saw videos aimed at provoking fear of accidents. (2020-12-15)

Using water fleas, UTA researchers investigate adaptive evolution
Researchers from The University of Texas at Arlington resurrected the preserved eggs of a shrimp-like crustacean to examine long-standing questions about adaptive evolution, reporting the results in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Science. (2020-12-11)

How automated vehicles can impede driver performance, and what to do about it
A University of Toronto Engineering study is underscoring the importance of drivers keeping their eyes on the road -- even when they are in an automated vehicle (AV). The findings, published recently in the journal Accident Analysis & Prevention, revealed that drivers can become over-reliant on AV technology. This was especially true with a type of in-vehicle display the team coined as takeover request and automation capability (TORAC). (2020-12-01)

New method identifies adaptive mutations in complex evolving populations
A research team co-led by a scientist at the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology has developed a method to study how HIV mutates to escape the immune system in multiple patients, which could inform HIV vaccine design. (2020-11-30)

Which factors trigger leaf die-off in autumn?
Researchers at ETH Zurich have identified a self-regulating mechanism in European deciduous trees that limits their growing-season length: Trees that photosynthesise more in spring and summer lose their leaves earlier in autumn. (2020-11-26)

Dogmatic people seek less information even when uncertain
People who are dogmatic about their views seek less information and make less accurate judgements as a result, even on simple matters unrelated to politics, according to a study led by UCL and Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics researchers. (2020-11-20)

How fishermen have adapted to change over the past 35+ years
An analysis published in Fish and Fisheries notes that marine fisheries are increasingly exposed to external drivers of social and ecological change, and recent changes have had different impacts upon the livelihood strategies favored by fishermen based on the size of their boats. (2020-11-18)

Mount Sinai develops machine learning models to predict critical illness and mortality in COVID-19 patients
Could Help Improve Patient Care, Health Outcomes, and Allocation of Hospital Resources (2020-11-10)

You drive like a girl: Study shows gender bias in perceptions of ride-sharing performance
While digital brokerages provide a more efficient method for the exchange of goods and services and an improved way for consumers to voice their opinions about the quality of work they receive, bias and discrimination can emerge as part of the review process, according to Notre Dame research. (2020-11-09)

Machine learning helps pinpoint sources of the most common cardiac arrhythmia
Researchers have designed a new ML-based approach for detecting atrial fibrillation drivers, small patches of the heart muscle that are hypothesized to cause this most common type of cardiac arrhythmia. The team tested their approach on 11 explanted human hearts, all donated posthumously for research purposes. Turned out, that their ML model can indeed efficiently interpret data with an accuracy of up to 81%. (2020-10-29)

Racial disparities in treatment for common lung cancer persist despite gains
African American patients with lung cancer are still less likely to receive the most effective treatment for a common type of early stage lung cancer. (2020-10-28)

To avoid impression that SARS-CoV-2 transmission is ever-changing, interpret new info using existing
The global spread of SARS-CoV-2 has taken a variety of forms, ranging from localized and quickly controlled outbreaks to large, ongoing epidemics with deadly consequences. (2020-10-22)

Journal series gives in-depth look at COVID-19's impact on the heart
Since the emergence of the COVID-19 pandemic, the impact of the virus on the heart has become more prevalent, with clinicians acting in real time to effectively help heart disease patients and those at higher risk who contract coronavirus. The Journal of the American College of Cardiology has issued a three-part focus seminar on COVID-19 in 2020 to address the complex relationship between COVID-19 and the heart. (2020-10-19)

Want to wait less at the bus stop? Beware real-time updates
Smartphone apps that tell commuters when a bus will arrive at a stop don't result in less time waiting than reliance on an official bus route schedule, a new study suggests. In fact, people who followed the suggestions of transit apps to time their arrival for when the bus pulls up to the stop were likely to miss the bus about three-fourths of the time, results showed. (2020-10-13)

Battling with neighbors could make animals smarter
From ants to primates, 'Napoleonic' intelligence has evolved to help animals contend with the myriad cognitive challenges arising from interactions with rival outsiders, suggest researchers at the University of Bristol in a paper published in Nature Communications today [Tuesday 6 October]. (2020-10-06)

Virtual driving assessment shows feasibility, validity, efficiency as part of licensing
Researchers have demonstrated the feasibility of incorporating a virtual driving assessment system into the driver's licensing process in Ohio. The researchers also assessed the validity of the tool in identifying likely on-road test failure while providing personalized feedback regarding skills that need improvement to keep drivers safe. (2020-10-05)

More than 90% of driver's license suspensions are not related to traffic safety
A study conducted found that the vast majority of license suspensions are for non-driving-related events, such as failure to pay a fine or appear in court, and that these suspensions disproportionately affect those living in low-income communities and in communities with a greater percentage of Black and Hispanic residents. (2020-09-29)

Why do veterans take their own lives? New study finds surprising answers
A George Mason University study of US veterans found that while social determinants of health - like homelessness, social isolation, or unemployment -- can predict suicide, they are not the cause of it. Mental illness leads to both adverse life events, such as social isolation and suicide, creating the incorrect appearance that adverse events cause suicide. Dr. Farrokh Alemi led the study that suggests the importance of addressing the root cause of suicide and self-harm: mental illness. (2020-09-29)

Smart cruise control steers drivers toward better decisions
Smart cruise control, better human decisions. Michigan Tech engineers study how cars and trucks move cooperatively on the road, respond to each other's environmental sensors and react as a group to lessen traffic jams and protect the humans inside. (2020-09-29)

Overpriced? TUD researchers explain artificial price increases in the taxi app Uber
How exactly does the strategy of the artificial price increases in the taxi app Uber work and when is it used? This is what Dr. Malte Schröder and Professor Marc Timme from the Chair for Network Dynamics at the Center for Advancing Electronics Dresden (cfaed) and the Institute for Theoretical Physics at TU Dresden have been investigating alongside PhD students David-Maximilian Storch and Philip Marszal. The two researchers published a study in the journal Nature Communications. (2020-09-24)

Ecological factors driving microbial community assembly in response to warming
Researchers from the OU Institute for Environmental Genomics and Department of Microbiology and Plant Biology lead a study that aims to better understand ecological community assembly mechanisms in response to climate warming. (2020-09-22)

Camera monitoring significantly improves safety of HGV driving
A new study has shown HGV drivers drive much more safely when there are cameras in their cabs monitoring their behaviour. (2020-09-15)

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