Current Driving News and Events

Current Driving News and Events, Driving News Articles.
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Novice drivers talking on hand-held smartphones are more likely to run red-lights
Young novice drivers who speak into hand-held smartphones while driving are also likely to drive while under the influence of drink or drugs, according to researchers at Lero, the Science Foundation Ireland Research Centre for Software. (2021-02-23)

Music is a must for young drivers, according to Ben-Gurion U. researchers
According to the study published in APA's journal Psychomusicology: Music, Mind and Brain, 140 young adults responded to a 67-item questionnaire exploring how drivers engage with music while driving. Ironically, most of the respondents (80%) claimed it was not only ''difficult,'' but sometimes ''near impossible'' to concentrate on traffic and road conditions without music playing. And once they arrive, most of the respondents will stay in their car at their destination until the song ends. (2021-02-22)

The appearance of robots affects our perception of the morality of their decisions
Artificial intelligence and robotics are advancing at a rapid pace, with the number of autonomous intelligent machines making moral choices among us continuously on the rise. Knowledge in moral psychology pertaining to artificial intelligence and robotics is important when discussing the ethics of their development. (2021-02-22)

Body shape, beyond weight, drives fat stigma for women
Fat stigma in women contributes to poor medical outcomes and negatively affects educational and economic opportunities. A new study from scientists at Arizona State University and Oklahoma State University shows that body shape, beyond overall weight, drives fat stigma. Women with overweight and obesity who carry gluteofemoral fat were less stigmatized than those who carry abdominal fat. These findings could affect how interventions for overweight and obesity are designed and delivered. (2021-02-17)

Scientists suggested using non-symmetrical magnets for target drug delivery
A team of scientists from Immanuel Kant Baltic Federal University and the University of Genoa suggested combining permanent magnets of different shapes to target magnetic particles with drugs at the organs of lab mice. Such a combination secured a magnetic driving force that was ten times stronger compared to regular cylindrical magnets. (2021-02-09)

Taking the fear out of driver education
New drivers ages 15-25 cause nearly 1/2 of the 1 million+ road deaths worldwide. A new study in Risk Analysis suggests that driver ed programs use of fear-based messaging doesn't reduce risky driving and may even lead young drivers to take more chances. (2021-02-02)

Newly licensed autistic drivers crash less than other young drivers
A collaborative study found that compared with their non-autistic peers, young autistic drivers have lower rates of moving violations and license suspensions, as well as similar to lower crash rates. (2021-01-28)

Optical scanner design for adaptive driving beam systems can lead to safer night driving
In a recent study published in the Journal of Optical Microsystems, researchers from Japan have come up with an alternative to conventional adaptive driving beam systems: a microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) optical scanner that relies on the piezoelectric effect of electrically induced mechanical vibrations. (2021-01-27)

UC study: The dangers of drugged driving are outpacing drunk driving
A recent study of drugged driving, by a team of University of Cincinnati researchers, shows that a sizable percentage of individuals reported the use of marijuana and other illicit drugs while operating behind the wheel. (2021-01-26)

Charging ahead for electric vehicles
Roads installed with wireless charging technology could become an integral feature of our cities in an electric vehicle future. (2021-01-03)

Blood alcohol levels much lower than the legal limit impair hand-eye coordination
In previous studies, eye movements and vision were only affected at blood alcohol concentrations (BACs) approaching the legal limit for driving (0.08% BAC), in England, Wales and Northern Ireland. (2020-12-21)

A community-level intervention reduces alcohol-related crashes
New research from the Prevention Research Center of the Pacific Institute for Research and Evaluation shows that a community-level alcohol intervention in California resulted in a 17% reduction in alcohol-involved crashes among drivers aged 15-30. (2020-12-20)

Nearly half of young drivers are resuming driving just weeks after sustaining a concussion
Researchers found that nearly half of adolescents who sought specialty care for a concussion were back to driving when asked approximately two weeks after the injury, even though few had returned to exercise and sports. (2020-12-15)

Positive messages encourage safer driver behavior than fear tactics
A new study has shown that films demonstrating responsible behavior could lead to young drivers taking fewer risks on the road than if they only saw videos aimed at provoking fear of accidents. (2020-12-15)

Miniature guttural toads on Mauritius and Réunion stun researchers
Researchers from the DSI/NRF Center for Invasion Biology at Stellenbosch University in South Africa have found that, scarcely a hundred years after Guttural Toads were introduced to the islands of Mauritius and Réunion, their overall body size has been reduced by up to a third compared to their counterparts in South Africa. (2020-12-08)

Cannabidiol (CBD) in cannabis does not impair driving, landmark study shows
New research shows from the Lambert Initiative at the University of Sydney shows that cannabidiol is safe for driving and the intoxicating effects of THC in cannabis fade in hours. The results have big implications for regulation of medical cannabis and for drug-driving laws regarding cannabis. (2020-12-01)

How automated vehicles can impede driver performance, and what to do about it
A University of Toronto Engineering study is underscoring the importance of drivers keeping their eyes on the road -- even when they are in an automated vehicle (AV). The findings, published recently in the journal Accident Analysis & Prevention, revealed that drivers can become over-reliant on AV technology. This was especially true with a type of in-vehicle display the team coined as takeover request and automation capability (TORAC). (2020-12-01)

Showing robots how to drive a car...in just a few easy lessons
USC researchers have designed a system that lets robots autonomously learn complicated tasks from a very small number of demonstrations--even imperfect ones. While current state-of-art methods need at least 100 demonstrations to nail a specific task, this new method allows robots to learn from only a handful of demonstrations. (2020-11-19)

Upgraded radar can enable self-driving cars to see clearly no matter the weather
A new kind of radar could make it possible for self-driving cars to navigate safely in bad weather. Electrical engineers at the University of California San Diego developed a clever way to improve the imaging capability of existing radar sensors so that they accurately predict the shape and size of objects in the scene. The system worked well when tested at night and in foggy conditions. (2020-11-17)

Is zoom increasing the demand for plastic surgery
Patients are seeking plastic surgery in record numbers, citing their appearance on Zoom as a cause. Of particular concern are noses and wrinkles. (2020-11-13)

Solar cells of the future
Organic solar cells are cheaper to produce and more flexible than their counterparts made of crystalline silicon, but do not offer the same level of efficiency or stability. During his doctoral thesis, Andrej Classen, who is a young researcher at FAU, demonstrated that increases in efficiency can be achieved using luminescent acceptor molecules. (2020-11-03)

Intelligent cameras enhance human perception
A team of FAU researchers has developed an intelligent camera that achieves not only high spatial and temporal but also spectral resolution. The camera has a wide range of applications that can improve environmental protection and resource conservation measures as well as autonomous driving or modern agriculture. (2020-11-02)

New deep learning models: Fewer neurons, more intelligence
An international research team from TU Wien, IST Austria and MIT has developed a new artificial intelligence system based on the brains of tiny animals, such as threadworms. This novel AI-system can control a vehicle with just a few artificial neurons. It copes much better with noisy input, and, because of its simplicity, its mode of operation can be explained in detail. This new deep learning model has been published in Nature Machine Intelligence. (2020-10-13)

Stopping opioid-related addiction, harm and accidents after surgery
An international group of global experts including anaesthetists, surgeons and other healthcare professionals have come together to publish a consensus statement on the prevention of opioid-related harm in adult surgical patients. The consensus statement is published in Anaesthesia (a journal of the Association of Anaesthetists). (2020-10-07)

Caring for others is a key driver in getting people to use chatbots for mental health
A study assessed what would motivate people to use chatbots for mental health services in the wake of a mass shooting. The researchers found that users' desire to help others with mental health problems was a more powerful driver than seeking help for their own problems. (2020-10-05)

Virtual driving assessment shows feasibility, validity, efficiency as part of licensing
Researchers have demonstrated the feasibility of incorporating a virtual driving assessment system into the driver's licensing process in Ohio. The researchers also assessed the validity of the tool in identifying likely on-road test failure while providing personalized feedback regarding skills that need improvement to keep drivers safe. (2020-10-05)

More than 90% of driver's license suspensions are not related to traffic safety
A study conducted found that the vast majority of license suspensions are for non-driving-related events, such as failure to pay a fine or appear in court, and that these suspensions disproportionately affect those living in low-income communities and in communities with a greater percentage of Black and Hispanic residents. (2020-09-29)

Driving behavior less 'robotic' thanks to new Delft model
Researchers from TU Delft have now developed a new model that describes driving behaviour on the basis of one underlying 'human' principle: managing the risk below a threshold level. This model can accurately predict human behaviour during a wide range of driving tasks. In time, the model could be used in intelligent cars, to make them feel less 'robotic'. The research will be published in Nature Communications on Tuesday 29 September 2020. (2020-09-29)

Smart cruise control steers drivers toward better decisions
Smart cruise control, better human decisions. Michigan Tech engineers study how cars and trucks move cooperatively on the road, respond to each other's environmental sensors and react as a group to lessen traffic jams and protect the humans inside. (2020-09-29)

Shift in West African wildmeat trade suggests erosion of cultural taboos
New research by the University of Kent's Durrell Institute of Conservation and Ecology (DICE) has demonstrated a clear fluctuation in the trade of wildmeat in and around the High Niger National Park in Guinea, West Africa. (2020-09-17)

The accident preventers
Before autonomous vehicles participate in road traffic, they must demonstrate conclusively that they do not pose a danger to others. New software developed at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) prevents accidents by predicting different variants of a traffic situation every millisecond. (2020-09-16)

Camera monitoring significantly improves safety of HGV driving
A new study has shown HGV drivers drive much more safely when there are cameras in their cabs monitoring their behaviour. (2020-09-15)

You can train your brain to reduce motion sickness
Visuospatial training exercises can train the brain to reduce motion sickness, providing a potential remedy for future passengers riding in autonomous vehicles. Researchers at WMG, University of Warwick reduced motion sickness by over 50% using the training tool and it was found to be effective in both a driving simulator and on-road experimentation. (2020-09-14)

Evidence of power: Phasing quantum annealers into experiments from nonequilibrium physics
Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) use commercially available quantum annealers, a type of quantum computer, to experimentally probe the validity of an important mechanism from nonequilibrium physics in open quantum systems. The results not only shed light into the extent of applicability of this mechanism and an extension of it, but also showcase how quantum annealers can serve as effective platforms for quantum simulations. (2020-09-10)

New perception metric balances reaction time, accuracy
Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University have developed a new metric for evaluating how well self-driving cars respond to changing road conditions and traffic, making it possible for the first time to compare perception systems for both accuracy and reaction time. (2020-09-09)

Quantum shake
There they were, in all their weird quantum glory: ultracold lithium atoms in the optical trap operated by UC Santa Barbara undergraduate student Alec Cao and his colleagues in David Weld's atomic physics group. Held by lasers in a regular, lattice formation and ''driven'' by pulses of energy, these atoms were doing crazy things. (2020-09-09)

Alzheimer's burden greater in rural Appalachia, study finds
Alzheimer's disease is more common in rural Appalachian Ohio communities than in other rural areas in the state - raising concerns about access to early, specialized care in a region where many residents face struggles getting the medical care they need, a new study has found. (2020-09-02)

Adapting ideas from quantum physics to calculate alternative interventions for infection and cancer
Published in Nature Physics, findings from a new study co-led by Cleveland Clinic and Case Western Reserve University teams show for the first time how ideas from quantum physics can help develop novel drug interventions for bacterial infections and cancer. (2020-08-24)

Smartphones can tell when you're drunk by analyzing your walk
Your smartphone can tell when you've had too much to drink by detecting changes in the way you walk, according to a new study published in the Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs. (2020-08-18)

Car passengers can reduce pollution risk by closing windows and changing route
Drivers and passengers can inhale significantly lower levels of air pollution by setting their vehicle's ventilation systems more effectively and taking a 'cleaner' route to their destination, a new study reveals. (2020-08-11)

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