Current Dropout Rate News and Events

Current Dropout Rate News and Events, Dropout Rate News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Viewed
Page 1 of 13 | 488 Results
LSU Health study finds psychosocial factors may drive peritoneal dialysis patient dropout
A retrospective study conducted by LSU Health New Orleans reports that contrary to previous research, most patients who drop out of peritoneal dialysis may do so for psychosocial reasons. The findings are published in The American Journal of the Medical Sciences. The paper inspired a companion editorial. (2021-02-19)

Challenge to anorexia nervosa treatment guidelines
New analysis published in The Lancet Psychiatry has shown a lack of strong evidence to support current guidance on psychological therapies for treating anorexia nervosa over expert treatment as usual. The findings highlight a need for further research and support a call for individual trial data to be made available so the benefits of treatments in specific patient populations can be better understood. (2021-02-15)

Forecast :125,000 fewer U.S. COVID deaths if 50% initiate vaccination by March 1
A new report combining forecasting and expert prediction data, predicts that 125,000 lives could be saved by the end of 2021 if 50% or more of the U.S. population initiated COVID vaccination by March 1, 2021. (2021-01-29)

Predictive value of blood pressure, heart rate, and blood pressure/heart rate ratio in a Chinese subpopulation with vasovagal syncope
In a new publication from Cardiovascular Innovations and Applications; DOI https://doi.org/10.15212/CVIA.2019.1266, Zhuzhi Wen, Jingying Hou, Zun Mai, Huifen Huang, Yangxin Chen, Dengfeng Geng and Jingfeng Wang from Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, China and Guandong Province Key Laboratory of Arrhythmia and Electrophysiology, Guangzhou, China consider predictive value of blood pressure, heart rate, and blood pressure/heart rate ratio in a Chinese subpopulation with vasovagal syncope. (2021-01-22)

Infant health inequality has increased since 2010, study finds
After decades of narrowing gaps in health between infants born to the most and least advantaged American mothers, infant health inequality is increasing, portending a rise in health and social inequity that could last for decades. (2020-12-08)

Dogs may never learn that every sound of a word matters
Despite their excellent auditory capacities, dogs do not attend to differences between words which differ only in one speech sound (e.g. dog vs dig), according to a new study by Hungarian researchers measuring brain activity with non-invasive electroencephalography (EEG) on awake dogs. This might be a reason why the number of words dogs learn to recognize typically remains very low throughout their life. (2020-12-08)

How do basal ganglia neurons convey information for the control of voluntary movements?
Researchers revealed how neurons in the basal ganglia, which are a brain region crucial for the control of voluntary movements and whose damage induces motor impairment, such as Parkinson's disease, convey information for the movement control by recording activity of multiple neurons simultaneously in Japanese monkeys. (2020-10-27)

Therapy plus medication better than medication alone in bipolar disorder
A review of 39 randomized clinical trials by scientists from UCLA and their colleagues from other institutions has found that combining the use medication with psychoeducational therapy is more effective at preventing a recurrence of illness in people with bipolar disorder than medication alone. (2020-10-14)

Patients' breathing test comes up short on accuracy, study finds
A routine test used to monitor patients' breathing may be unreliable and putting them at risk, a study suggests. Incorrect results can mean clinical staff fail to spot how unwell a patient with respiratory problems is becoming, researchers say. (2020-09-27)

Teacher stress linked with higher risk of student suspensions, MU researcher finds
Just how stressed are teachers? A recent Gallup poll found teachers are tied with nurses for the most stressful occupation in America today. Unfortunately, that stress can have a trickle-down effect on their students, leading to disruptive behavior that results in student suspensions. (2020-09-15)

Depression risk detected by measuring heart rate changes
For the first time doctors have shown that measuring changes in 24-hour heart rate can reliably indicate whether or not someone is depressed. In practical terms, this may give clinicians an objective ''early warning'' of potential depression, as well as a rapid indication whether or not treatment is working, so opening the way to more rapid and responsive treatment. (2020-09-11)

Heavy TV and computer use impacts children's academic results
Grade 3 students who watch more than two hours of TV daily or spend more than one hour a day on a computer experience a decline in academic results two years later, a new study has found. (2020-09-02)

Study of one million Danish children: Childhood adversity increases the risk of early death
Social adversity in early childhood appears to be a significant risk factor for death in early adulthood. Children who have experienced repeated serious adversity such as losing a parent, mental illness in the family, poverty or being placed in foster care have a 4.5 times higher risk of dying in early adulthood than children who have not experienced adversity during childhood. This is the conclusion of a new large-scale study conducted at the University of Copenhagen. (2020-08-19)

First generation university students need more guidance navigating education system
Young people who are the first in their family to go to university are less likely to attend an elite institution and are more likely to drop out than those with graduate parents, according to new research led by the UCL Centre for Longitudinal Studies. (2020-08-11)

Credible assumptions replace missing data in COVID analysis
How contagious is COVID-19, and how severe is the virus for those who've caught it? (2020-08-06)

Gout diagnoses rising worldwide
The prevalence of gout -- a form of arthritis characterized by severe pain, redness, and tenderness in joints--increased across the world at an alarming rate from 1990 to 2017, according to an analysis published in Arthritis & Rheumatology. (2020-08-05)

Rural firearm-suicides impacted by socioeconomic, environmental factors
In an attempt to address the escalating rate of self-inflicted firearm injury deaths in rural America, researchers are proposing interventions to reduce these suicides be community-based and include programs to reduce other diseases of despair, such as heart and liver diseases, diabetes and accidental opioid overdose. The recent decline in life expectancy of Americans has been attributed to these diseases of despair and appear to primarily afflict white rural America (2020-07-21)

STEM not for women?
A study by Natalia Maloshonok and Irina Shcheglova, research fellows of the HSE University, examines how and why gender stereotypes can disempower female students, leading to poor academic performance and high dropout rates. According to the study, more than one in three (35%) young women have been led to believe in men's superior mathematical ability. (2020-07-21)

Coronavirus antibodies fall dramatically in first 3 months after mild cases of COVID-19
A study by UCLA researchers shows that in people with mild cases of COVID-19, antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 -- the virus that causes the disease -- drop sharply over the first three months after infection, decreasing by roughly half every 73 days. If sustained at that rate, the antibodies would disappear within about a year. (2020-07-21)

Two studies suggest strategies to help students at community colleges and broad access institutions
A brief reading and writing exercise designed to alleviate worries about sense of belonging helped students at a midwestern broad-access public university with a high Hispanic population stay in school, raising continuous enrollment over 2 years by 9% among socially disadvantaged students, according to a new study. The findings suggest that social belonging (2020-07-15)

Study of supercooled liquids contributes to better understanding of phase change processes
The authors propose a new quantitative approach to better measure the crystal growth rate in supercooled liquids. The approach is based on a unique statistical algorithm used in molecular dynamics simulation. (2020-07-09)

Marine training may take more mental than physical grit
Keck Medicine of USC study identifies psychological measures that may predict who is more likely to complete - or quit - a demanding marine training course (2020-06-25)

Canadian study of critically ill patients with COVID-19 found lower death rate
A Canadian case series of all patients with COVID-19 admitted to six intensive care units (ICUs) in Metro Vancouver found patient outcomes were substantially better than reported in other jurisdictions. The paper is published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal) https://www.cmaj.ca/content/cmaj/early/2020/05/27/cmaj.200794.full.pdf. (2020-05-27)

Future dynamics prediction from short-term time series by anticipated learning machine
Predicting short-term time series has significant practical applications over different disciplines. A dynamics-based data-driven method, Anticipated Learning Machine (ALM) is proposed to achieve precise future-state predictions based on short-term but high-dimensional data. From nonlinear-dynamical systems theory, ALM can transform recent spatial information of high-dimensional variables into future temporal information of any target variable, thereby overcoming the small-sample problem and achieving multi-step-ahead predictions. Experiments on real-world datasets demonstrate superior performances of ALM. (2020-04-15)

Study questions impact of pregnancy-related programme on stillbirth rates
A new Ultrasound in Obstetrics & Gynecology study of 11 million pregnancies in the UK calls into question the impact of the Growth Assessment Protocol (GAP) program on stillbirth rate. (2020-04-08)

Brief entrance test can predict academic success within first year of study in economics
German researchers at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) and Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin found that even a short test can reliably predict students' success within their first year of study in economics -- much better than an intelligence test or predictions based on school grades. (2020-03-13)

Active droplets
Using a mixture of oil droplets and hydrogel, medical active agents can be not only precisely dosed, but also continuously administered over periods of up to several days. The active agents inside the droplets are released at a constant rate, decreasing the risk of over- or underdosage. (2020-02-20)

New online therapy for lingering depression symptoms could fill important gap in care
A pioneering therapy for lingering depressive symptoms developed by U of T psychologist is now available online (2020-02-06)

Neurological disorders are linked to elevated suicide rates
A newly published study in JAMA shows that people with neurological disorders have a 75% higher suicide rate than people with no neurological disorders. Still, suicide deaths are rare events. While the suicide rate for the general population is around 20 per 100,000, the rate for people with neurological disorders is around 40 per 100,000 person-years. The study is based on the data covering the entire population of Denmark and followed over 37 years. (2020-02-04)

Emotions to help engage school students in learning
Psychology researchers from HSE University have trialed the reliability of a student engagement scale on 537 Russian primary school students. The findings indicated that the emotional component contributes the most to school engagement. The paper has been published in PLOS ONE journal.https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0225542 (2020-01-15)

Young adults using both e-cigarettes and combustible cigarettes at significantly higher risk of stroke
People are looking at e-cigarettes as a 'healthy' alternative to cigarettes and we currently have an epidemic of e-cigarettes use. However, according to a new study in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine, published by Elsevier, young adults who smoke cigarettes plus use e-cigarettes are nearly two times more likely to have a stroke compared to current cigarette-only smokers and nearly three times more likely than non-smokers. (2020-01-07)

Research in sheep suggests possible early test for fetal heart health
Changes in heart rate, due to low oxygen conditions, experienced by the fetus during pregnancy, could be used to predict the future heart health of babies, shows research published in The Journal of Physiology today. (2019-12-04)

Trial compares SSRI vs. placebo for obsessive-compulsive behaviors in kids, teens with ASD
Researchers compared the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) fluoxetine with placebo for reducing the frequency and severity of obsessive-compulsive behaviors in children and adolescents with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in this randomized clinical trial in Australia. The trial included 146 participants (ages 7 to 18) with ASDs; 75 received fluoxetine and 71 received placebo for 16 weeks. (2019-10-22)

Anorexia nervosa among young children in the UK and Ireland on the up
The annual number of new cases of anorexia nervosa among 8 to 12 year olds in the UK and Ireland is around double that of a previous estimate in 2006, indicates research published in the online journal BMJ Open. (2019-10-22)

Little evidence common antidepressant is effective in autism spectrum disorders
A new study has found there is little evidence that a widely used antidepressant is effective at reducing obsessive compulsive behaviors in children and adolescents with autism spectrum disorders. (2019-10-22)

First entirely digital clinical trial encourages physical activity
As little as a daily ping on your phone can boost physical activity, researchers from the Stanford University School of Medicine and their collaborators report in a new study. (2019-10-09)

New report: Men without work face a worrying well-being crisis
A new IZA World of Labor report publishing tomorrow (Oct. 2) finds the number of prime-age males outside the labor force increasing worldwide. This development goes hand in hand with an increase in ill-being driven by high levels of stress, desperation and anger. (2019-10-02)

Similar information rates across languages, despite divergent speech rates
Spanish may seem to be spoken at a higher speed than Vietnamese, but that doesn't make it any more 'efficient'. Researchers affiliated with the CNRS and Université Lumière Lyon 2 (Dynamique du Langage laboratory) have shown that human languages are equally effective at transmitting information, even if the speeds at which they are spoken differ. (2019-09-05)

Black male educators sound alarm regarding lack of diversity in P-12 classrooms
University of Phoenix and the National Network of State Teachers of the Year (NNSTOY) partnered to publish a white paper examining of the career trajectories of Black male educators in P-12 from three perspectives: recruitment, retention, and mobility. The authors incorporated the insights, observations, and opinions of NNSTOY fellows, using reflective quotes and personal narratives, into a focused dialogue that presents recommendations for future initiatives, models, and actions supporting Black males in the education workforce. (2019-08-01)

Review evaluates how AI could boost the success of clinical trials
In a review publishing July 17, 2019 in the journal Trends in Pharmacological Sciences, researchers examined how artificial intelligence (AI) could affect drug development in the coming decade. (2019-07-17)

Page 1 of 13 | 488 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.