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Current Drought News and Events, Drought News Articles.
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Researchers find some forests crucial for climate change mitigation, biodiversity
Researchers have identified forests in the western United States that should be preserved for their potential to mitigate climate change through carbon sequestration, as well as to enhance biodiversity. (2019-12-09)
Breakthrough in battle against invasive plants
Plants that can 'bounce back' after disturbances like ploughing, flooding or drought are the most likely to be 'invasive' if they're moved to new parts of the world, scientists say. (2019-12-06)
Silverswords may be gone with the wind
In a new study in the Ecological Society of America's journal Ecological Monographs, researchers seek to understand recent population declines of Haleakalā silverswords and identify conservation strategies for the future. (2019-12-04)
Rural decline not driven by water recovery
New research from the University of Adelaide has shown that climate and economic factors are the main drivers of farmers leaving their properties in the Murray-Darling Basin, not reduced water for irrigation as commonly claimed. (2019-12-04)
Raising plants to withstand climate change
Success with improving a model plant's response to harsh conditions is leading plant molecular researchers to move to food crops including wheat, barley, rice and chickpeas. (2019-12-03)
Genomic gymnastics help sorghum plant survive drought
A new study provides the first detailed look at how the sorghum plant exercises exquisite control over its genome -- switching some genes on and some genes off at the first sign of water scarcity, and again when water returns -- to survive when its surroundings turn harsh and arid. (2019-12-02)
LANL news: Drought impact study shows new issues for plants and carbon dioxide
Extreme drought's impact on plants will become more dominant under future climate change, as noted in a paper out today in the journal Nature Climate Change. (2019-11-25)
Forests face climate change tug of war
Increased carbon dioxide allows plants to photosynthesize more and use less water. (2019-11-25)
What felled the great Assyrian Empire? A Yale professor weighs in
The Neo-Assyrian Empire, centered in northern Iraq and extending from Iran to Egypt -- the largest empire of its time -- collapsed after more than two centuries of dominance at the fall of its capital, Nineveh, in 612 B.C.E. (2019-11-14)
Climate change influenced rise and fall of Northern Iraq's Neo-Assyrian Empire
Changes in climate may have contributed to both the rise and collapse of the Neo-Assyrian Empire in northern Iraq, which was considered the most powerful empire of its time, according to a new study. (2019-11-13)
When reporting climate-driven human migration, place matters
Location matters when talking about how climate might or might not be driving migration from Central America. (2019-11-13)
Climate may have helped crumble one of the ancient world's most powerful civilizations
New research suggests it was climate-related drought that built the foundation for the collapse of the Assyrian Empire (whose heartland was based in today's northern Iraq)--one of the most powerful civilizations in the ancient world. (2019-11-13)
Rising grain prices in response to phased climatic change during 1736-1850 in the North China Plain
The links between climatic change and grain price anomalies in the North China Plain (NCP) during the Qing Dynasty were analyzed. (2019-11-11)
Solar and wind energy preserve groundwater for drought, agriculture
A Princeton University-led study in Nature Communications is among the first to show that solar and wind energy not only enhance drought resilience, but also aid in groundwater sustainability. (2019-11-06)
Switching to solar and wind will reduce groundwater use
IIASA researchers explored optimal pathways for managing groundwater and hydropower trade-offs for different water availability conditions as solar and wind energy start to play a more prominent role in the state of California. (2019-11-06)
What we can learn from Indigenous land management
First Nations peoples' world view and connection to Country provide a rich source of knowledge and innovations for better land and water management policies when Indigenous decision-making is enacted, Australian researchers say. (2019-11-05)
Severe drought shuts down reproduction in copperhead snakes, study finds
A long-term study of copperhead snakes in a forest near Meriden, Conn., revealed that five consecutive years of drought effectively ended the snakes' reproductive output. (2019-10-29)
Game changer: New chemical keeps plants plump
A UC Riverside-led team has created a chemical to help plants hold onto water, which could stem the tide of massive annual crop losses from drought and help farmers grow food despite a changing climate. (2019-10-25)
An evapotranspiration deficit drought index to detect drought impacts on ecosystems
The difference between actual and potential evapotranspiration, technically termed a standardized evapotranspiration deficit drought index (SEDI), can more sensitively capture the biological changes of ecosystems in response to the dynamics of drought intensity, compared with indices based on precipitation and temperature. (2019-10-24)
A new drought-protective small molecule 'drug' for crops
Using a structure-guided approach to small molecule discovery and design, researchers have developed a drought-protective 'drug' for crops, according to a new study. (2019-10-24)
Future flash drought will increase over humid regions
proposed a new definition of flash drought based on rapid decline rate of soil moisture and the dry persistency. (2019-10-17)
Preventing future forest diebacks
Removing dead trees from the forests and reforesting on a large scale: this is the German Federal Government's strategy against 'Forest Dieback 2.0'. (2019-10-02)
Helping tobacco plants save water
Eleni Stavrinidou and her research group at the Laboratory of Organic Electronics, Linköping University, have used bioelectronics to influence transpiration in a tobacco plant, without harming the plant in any way. (2019-09-30)
New function in a protein of plants essential to developing drought-tolerant crops
Researchers of the Universitat Politècnica de València and the University of Malaga have discovered a new function in the BAG4 plant protein. (2019-09-26)
How a protein connecting calcium and plant hormone regulates plant growth
A new Tel Aviv University study finds that a unique mechanism involving calcium, the plant hormone auxin and a calcium-binding protein is responsible for regulating plant growth. (2019-09-26)
Study: Climate change could cause drought in wheat-growing areas
Wheat supplies about 20 percent of all calories consumed by humans. (2019-09-25)
New AI app predicts climate change stress for farmers in Africa
A new artificial intelligence (AI) tool available for free in a smartphone app can predict near-term crop productivity for farmers in Africa and may help them protect their staple crops -- such as maize, cassava and beans -- in the face of climate warming, according to Penn State researchers. (2019-09-23)
Grains in the rain
Of the major food crops, only rice is currently able to survive flooding. (2019-09-19)
Sesame yields stable in drought conditions
Research shows adding sesame to cotton-sorghum crop rotations is possible in west Texas (2019-09-18)
Peatlands trap CO2, even during droughts
French scientists studied the two species of moss that make up the peatland. (2019-09-17)
Harnessing tomato jumping genes could help speed-breed drought-resistant crops
Once dismissed as 'junk DNA' that served no purpose, a family of 'jumping genes' found in tomatoes has the potential to accelerate crop breeding for traits such as improved drought resistance. (2019-09-16)
'Planting water' is possible -- against aridity and droughts
Together with scientists from the UK and the US, researchers from the Leibniz- Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries (IGB) have developed a mathematical model that can reflect the complex interplays between vegetation, soil and water regimes. (2019-09-11)
New feedback phenomenon found to drive increasing drought and aridity
A new Columbia Engineering study indicates that the world will experience more frequent and more extreme drought and aridity than currently experienced in the coming century, exacerbated by both climate change and land-atmosphere processes. (2019-09-02)
Global warming may diminish plant genetic variety in Central Europe
Only a few individuals of a plant species may be prepared for increasing droughts. (2019-08-29)
How plants measure their carbon dioxide uptake
Plants face a dilemma in dry conditions: they have to seal themselves off to prevent losing too much water but this also limits their uptake of carbon dioxide. (2019-08-26)
Shasta dam releases can be managed to benefit both salmon and sturgeon, study finds
Cold water released from Lake Shasta into the Sacramento River to benefit endangered salmon can be detrimental to young green sturgeon, a threatened species adapted to warmer water. (2019-08-20)
Satellite study reveals that area emits one billion tonnes of carbon
A vast region of Africa affected by drought and changing land use emits as much carbon dioxide each year as 200 million cars, research suggests. (2019-08-13)
Mapping the effects of drought on vulnerable populations
The greater frequency of droughts, combined with underlying economic, social, and environmental risks means that dry spells have an increasingly destructive impact on vulnerable populations, and particularly on children in the developing world. (2019-08-12)
Back-to-back low snow years will become more common, study projects
Consecutive low snow years may become six times more common across the Western United States over the latter half of this century, leading to ecological and economic challenges such as expanded fire seasons and poor snow conditions at ski resorts, according to a new study. (2019-08-08)
How the Pacific Ocean influences long-term drought in the Southwestern US
Analyzing the full life cycle of long-term droughts and how they relate to El Niño and La Niña conditions in the Pacific Ocean could eventually lead to better prediction of damaging, multiyear droughts in the Southwestern US. (2019-08-06)
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