Current Drug Addiction News and Events

Current Drug Addiction News and Events, Drug Addiction News Articles.
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Lonely adolescents are susceptible to internet addiction
Loneliness is a risk factor associated with adolescents being drawn into compulsive internet use. The risk of compulsive use has grown in the coronavirus pandemic: loneliness has become increasingly prevalent among adolescents, who spend longer and longer periods of time online. (2021-02-22)

NYU Abu Dhabi researcher sheds new light on the psychology of radicalization
Learning more about what motivates people to join violent ideological groups and engage in acts of cruelty against others is of great social and societal importance. New research from Assistant Professor of Psychology at NYUAD Jocelyn BĂ©langer explores the idea of ideological obsession as a form of addictive behavior that is central to understanding why people ultimately engage in ideological violence, and how best to help them break this addiction. (2021-02-22)

New hope for treating chronic pain without opioids
According to some estimates, chronic pain affects up to 40% of Americans, and treating it frustrates both clinicians and patients--a frustration that's often compounded by a hesitation to prescribe opioids for pain. (2021-02-15)

Adult neurogenesis may hold clues for more effective treatment of alcoholism
Neuroplasticity, the remarkable ability of the brain to modify and reorganize itself, is affected by or in response to excessive alcohol, whether through individual consumption or exposure in the womb. It is now well accepted that the birth and integration of new neurons continue beyond development and into adulthood. New discoveries and insights on how alcohol impacts this and other plastic processes are discussed in ''Alcohol and Neural Plasticity,'' a special issue of Brain Plasticity. (2021-02-10)

Neural roots/origins of alcoholism identified by British and Chinese researchers
The physical origin of alcohol addiction has been located in a network of the human brain that regulates our response to danger, according to a team of British and Chinese researchers, co-led by the University of Warwick, the University of Cambridge, and Fudan University in Shanghai. (2021-02-08)

Death by suicide? Drug overdoses muddy waters for investigators, amplify mental health crisis
A new West Virginia University-led injury mortality study combines most drug overdose deaths with all suicides into an expanded self-injury category. Exposing a mental health crisis that has unraveled across the United States over the past two decades, study data have direct implications for suicide prevention efforts. (2021-02-08)

New study examines addiction medicine treatment in Vietnam
A study published in The Lancet HIV marks one of the first scientifically robust assessments of a new model of treating HIV in lower or middle income countries where injection drug use is a major cause of HIV infection. It also suggests the importance of building support for peer and community connections to tackle the opioid epidemic that continues to ravage the United States in the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic. (2021-02-04)

Social interactions after isolation may counteract cravings
Social interaction may help reverse food and cigarette cravings triggered by being in social isolation, a UNSW study in rats has found. The study, published in Scientific Reports, used an animal model of drug addiction to show that a return to social interaction gives the same result as living in a rich, stimulating environment in reducing cravings for both sugar and nicotine rewards. (2021-02-02)

BU researchers identify promising therapeutic agent against melanoma
There have been great advances in treating melanoma over the past five years, however, even with these treatments many patients quickly develop drug resistance and die from their disease. A new study from Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) has discovered that a drug (YK-4-279) that was previously created to target one specific type of protein has much broader use against a family of proteins that act to promote melanoma. (2021-02-01)

Post-overdose outreach programs in Massachusetts expanding
Boston Medical Center has released a study that shows post overdose outreach programs in Massachusetts have expanded across the state, as 44 percent of municipalities reported having such programs available - a majority established since 2015 - to reduce risks for those who survive an overdose. (2021-01-28)

Trying to beat a coke habit with cannabis? Not so fast !
Taking cannabidiol, a chemical in the cannabis sativa plant, isn't an effective way to reduce your dependence on cocaine, researchers at the CHUM Research Centre find. (2021-01-27)

Pain patients who take opioids can't get in the door at over half of primary care clinics
People who take opioid medications for chronic pain may have a hard time finding a new primary care clinic that will take them as a patient if they need one, according to a new 'secret shopper' study of hundreds of clinics across the country. Stigma against long-term users of prescription opioids, likely related to the prospect of taking on a patient who might have an opioid use disorder or addiction, appears to play a role. (2021-01-27)

Highly specific synaptic plasticity in addiction
Addiction, or substance use disorder (SUD), is a complex neurological condition that includes drug-seeking behavior among other cognitive, emotional and behavioral features. Synaptic plasticity, or changes in the way neurons communicate with one another, drives these addictive behaviors. A new study in Biological Psychiatry, published by Elsevier, now shows that players in the extracellular environment - not just at neuronal interfaces - contribute to addiction plasticity. (2021-01-26)

Gut microbiota reveals whether drug therapies work in inflammatory bowel diseases
A study recently completed at the University of Helsinki indicates that the gut microbiota of patients suffering from inflammatory gastrointestinal disorders can be used to predict whether they will benefit from expensive therapies. The study also confirms the key role of therapies that have a beneficial effect on the gut microbiota in inflammatory bowel diseases. (2021-01-26)

Targeted health messaging needed in era of vaping, researchers say
Health authorities should develop targeted health messages for vaping product and e-liquid packaging to encourage smokers to switch from cigarettes to e-cigarettes and to prevent non-smokers from taking up vaping, a researcher at the University of Otago, Wellington, New Zealand, says. (2021-01-26)

Consenting for treatment in advance to reduce leaving the hospital against medical advice among patients with addiction - Experts debate pros and cons
Patients with substance use disorders (SUDs) being treated for serious medical conditions are more likely to leave the hospital against medical advice (AMA) than those without addiction. A special type of contract with healthcare providers might enable patients to consent in advance to life-saving medical care - even if they later refuse treatment, according to a commentary in the Journal of Addiction Medicine, the official journal of the American Society of Addiction Medicine (ASAM). The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer. (2021-01-22)

University of Cincinnati research unveils possible new combo therapy for head and neck cancer
Researchers at the University of Cincinnati have tested a new combination therapy in animal models to see if they could find a way to make an already effective treatment even better. Since they're using a Food and Drug Administration-approved drug to do it, this could help people sooner than later. (2021-01-22)

Addiction researchers recount creating virtual recovery meetings during pandemic
Researchers at the Cofrin Logan Center for Addiction Research and Treatment at the University of Kansas Life Span Institute have published their experience making SMART Recovery groups available via computer and telephone to the community in Douglas County. (2021-01-21)

Methamphetamine overdose deaths rise sharply nationwide
Methamphetamine overdose deaths surged in an eight-year period in the United States, according to a study published today in JAMA Psychiatry. The analysis revealed rapid rises across all racial and ethnic groups, but American Indians and Alaska Natives had the highest death rates overall. The research was conducted at the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), part of the National Institutes of Health. (2021-01-20)

Medical terms for opioid addiction don't always reduce stigma, study finds
Researchers conducted a nationally representative study with more than 3,500 participants to test how six common terms describing someone treated for opioid-related impairment influenced perceptions. The researchers found that there was not one single term that can reduce all potential stigma biases. (2021-01-20)

Naltrexone use decreases the risk of hospitalization in persons with alcohol use disorder
Naltrexone, used either alone or together with disulfiram or acamprosate, is associated with a decreased risk of hospitalization due to alcohol use disorder (AUD) when compared with non-use of AUD drugs, a new register-based study shows. (2021-01-17)

Principles of care established for young adults with substance use disorders
A national group of pediatric addiction medicine experts have released newly-established principles of care for young adults with substance use disorder. Led by the Grayken Center for Addiction at Boston Medical Center, the collection of peer-reviewed papers was developed to guide providers on how to treat young adults with substance use disorder given their age-specific needs, as well as elevate national discussions on addressing these challenges more systematically. (2021-01-15)

New combination drug therapy offers hope against methamphetamine addiction
A new treatment that combines two existing medications may provide long-sought relief for many battling debilitating methamphetamine use disorder, according to a study to be published tomorrow in The New England Journal of Medicine. (2021-01-14)

Workaholism leads to mental and physical health problems
Workaholism or work addiction risk is a growing public health concern that can lead to many negative mental and physical health outcomes such as depression, anxiety or sleep disorder. Perception of work (job demands and job control) may become a major cause of employees' work addiction. The international group of researchers including the HSE University scientist explored the link between work addiction risk and health-related outcomes using the framework of Job Demand Control Model. (2021-01-13)

Treatment for chronic pain must address both physical and social pain
Physical pain and social pain may be more closely related than previously thought. Social pain, which typically results from interpersonal rejection or abuse, has been viewed as a non-medical response to external factors. However, recent research suggests that some physical and social stress responses may arise because of shared processing in the brain. (2021-01-12)

Physician-pharmacist collaboration may increase adherence to opioid addiction treatment
A collaborative approach to treating opioid use disorder that relies heavily on community pharmacists is feasible and may increase adherence and participant satisfaction, according to a pilot study published today in Addiction. The study was supported by the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), part of the National Institutes of Health, through the NIDA Center for the Clinical Trials Network. (2021-01-11)

Post-surgical patch releases non-opioid painkiller directly to the wound
A Duke-led team of scientists has developed a bio-compatible surgical patch that releases non-opioid painkillers directly to the site of a wound for days and then dissolves away. The polymer patch provides a controlled release of a drug that blocks the enzyme COX-2 (cyclooxygenase-2,) which drives pain and inflammation. The study appears Jan. 10, 2021 in the Journal of Controlled Release. (2021-01-11)

More than half of people using cannabis for pain experience multiple withdrawal symptoms
More than half of people who use medical marijuana products to ease pain also experience clusters of multiple withdrawal symptoms when they're between uses, a new study finds. And about 10% of the patients taking part in the study experienced worsening changes to their sleep, mood, mental state, energy and appetite over the next two years as they continued to use cannabis. (2021-01-08)

The link between opioid medication and pancreatic cancer
Using Center for Disease Control's national population health and cancer statistics datasets, Rush University Medical Center researchers determined that a state's opioid death rate significantly predicted the trend in the incidence of pancreatic cancer years later. This is the first study showing opioid use may be a risk factor contributing to the increasing incidence of pancreatic cancer (2021-01-06)

Increase in pleasurable effects of alcohol over time can predict alcohol use disorder
A new study out of the University of Chicago Medicine following young adult drinkers for 10 years has found that individuals who reported the highest sensitivity to alcohol's pleasurable and rewarding effects at the start of the trial were more likely to develop an alcohol use disorder (AUD) over the course of the study. (2021-01-05)

UC researcher urges caution using remdesivir to treat COVID-19
Research at the University of Cincinnati, however, contends that this antiviral drug is being used too indiscriminately when treating patients hospitalized with the virus. The study is published in the journal Fundamental & Clinical Pharmacology. (2020-12-29)

Light smokers may not escape nicotine addiction, study reveals
Even people who consider themselves to be casual cigarette smokers may be addicted, according to current diagnostic criteria. Researchers at Penn State College of Medicine and Duke University found that many light smokers -- those who smoke one to four cigarettes per day or fewer -- meet the criteria for nicotine addiction and should therefore be considered for treatment. (2020-12-23)

Study shows significant sex, age differences for nonfatal opioid overdoses in youth
Results of a national study show significant sex and age-based differences among youth and young adults who experience a nonfatal opioid overdose. (2020-12-22)

Cannabis could reduce fentanyl use, reduce overdose risk: Study
New research suggests that cannabis use by people in care for opioid addiction might improve their treatment outcomes and reduce their risk of being exposed to fentanyl in the contaminated unregulated drug supply. (2020-12-18)

Experimental vaccine can counter dangerous effects of synthetic cannabinoids
Made in clandestine laboratories and sold widely across the United States, the diverse class of drugs known as synthetic cannabinoids presents a growing public health threat. In a new study, Scripps Research scientists have devised a way to deactivate these designer drugs after they've been administered--offering a potential path for treating addiction and overdose. (2020-12-16)

Study: Surge of teen vaping levels off, but remains high as of early 2020
Findings released today from the most recent Monitoring the Future (MTF) survey of substance use behaviors and related attitudes among teens in the United States indicate that levels of nicotine and marijuana vaping did not increase from 2019 to early 2020, although they remain high. The annual MTF survey is conducted by the University of Michigan's Institute for Social Research, Ann Arbor, and is funded by the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), part of the National Institutes of Health. (2020-12-15)

Maximizing the uptake of a COVID-19 vaccine in people with severe mental illness
This Viewpoint discusses individual- and system-level barriers and solutions for people with serious mental illness to access COVID-19 vaccination when it is available. (2020-12-15)

USC study: Young adults who identify as Republicans eschew COVID safety precautions
Young Californians who identify themselves as Republicans are less likely to follow social distancing guidelines that prevent coronavirus transmission than those who identify as Democrats or Independents, according to new USC study published today in JAMA Internal Medicine. (2020-12-14)

New compound related to psychedelic ibogaine could treat addiction, depression
A non-hallucinogenic version of the psychedelic drug ibogaine, with potential for treating addiction, depression and other psychiatric disorders, has been developed by researchers at UC Davis. (2020-12-09)

Circadian gene mutation increases self-administration of cocaine in mice
University of Pittsburgh researchers reveal a molecular basis for the deep and fundamental connection between the disruption in circadian rhythms and predisposition to substance abuse. (2020-12-02)

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