Current Drug Companies News and Events

Current Drug Companies News and Events, Drug Companies News Articles.
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NYUAD researchers develop high throughput paper-based arrays of 3D tumor models
By engineering common filter papers, similar to coffee filters, a team of NYU Abu Dhabi researchers have created high throughput arrays of miniaturized 3D tumor models to replicate key aspects of tumor physiology, which are absent in traditional drug testing platforms. With the new paper-based technology, the formed tumor models can be safely cryopreserved and stored for prolonged periods for on-demand drug testing use. (2021-02-22)

Should Uber and Lyft be electrifying more vehicles?
Increases in air pollution and greenhouse gas emissions caused by ridesourcing impact human health and the environment--what happens when companies shoulder that cost? (2021-02-19)

Antibody-based COVID-19 treatments work best in concert with immune cells
Antibody-based drugs have been authorized for emergency use in COVID-19 patients by the Food and Drug Administration. Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have discovered that the ability to interact with other elements of the immune system is an indispensable part of the effectiveness of such antibodies. The findings could help improve the design of the next generation of antibody-based COVID-19 drugs. (2021-02-16)

Innovation predicts higher profits and stock returns
A large-scale study of the link between innovation and financial performance in Australian companies has found more innovative companies post higher future profits and stock returns. (2021-02-16)

Shining a light on the true value of solar power
Utility companies have worried that solar panels drive up electric costs for the people who don't have panels. Michigan Tech renewable energy researchers show the opposite is actually true -- grid-tied solar photovoltaic (PV) owners are actually subsidizing their non-PV neighbors. (2021-02-09)

Pharmacologist offers plan to solve disparities in designing medicine
In a new perspective piece published in the Feb. 5 issue of Science, Johns Hopkins pharmacologist Namandje Bumpus, Ph.D., outlines the molecular origins for differences in how well certain drugs work among distinct populations. She also lays out a four-part plan to improve the equity of drug development. (2021-02-04)

Popular breast cancer drugs don't work the way we thought they did
New research suggests that a class of drugs called PARP inhibitors, designed to treat hereditary forms of ovarian and breast cancer, don't work the way we thought they did. It also paints a fuller picture of how they work, opening the door to improvements in next-generation drugs. (2021-02-03)

Big name corporations more likely to commit fraud
Fortune 500 firms with strong growth profiles are more prone to corporate financial securities fraud than smaller, struggling companies, according to a recent study. Researchers examined more than 250 U.S. public corporations involved in fraud identified in SEC filings from 2005-2013, compared to a control sample of nonfraud firms. Trends emerged for a greater fraud risk including corporations listed in the Fortune 500, traded on the NYSE and that had strong growth imperatives. (2021-02-02)

BU researchers identify promising therapeutic agent against melanoma
There have been great advances in treating melanoma over the past five years, however, even with these treatments many patients quickly develop drug resistance and die from their disease. A new study from Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) has discovered that a drug (YK-4-279) that was previously created to target one specific type of protein has much broader use against a family of proteins that act to promote melanoma. (2021-02-01)

Scientists discover how remdesivir works to inhibit coronavirus
By pinning down the exact mechanism by which remdesivir shuts down SARS-CoV-2's process of copying genetic material, scientists now have clues to make even more effective antivirals to fight COVID-19. Better antivirals could become urgently needed if new strains of the virus have the ability to overcome current antivirals and vaccines. They could also help in future outbreaks if entirely new coronaviruses leap from animals to humans again. (2021-01-28)

People's acceptance of inequality affects response to company wrongdoings
People who do not accept inequality are more likely to negatively evaluate companies that have committed wrongdoings than people who do accept inequality, and this response varies by culture, according to researchers at Penn State. The team also found that companies can improve their standing with consumers when they offer sincere apologies and remedies for the harm they caused to victims. (2021-01-28)

Gut microbiota reveals whether drug therapies work in inflammatory bowel diseases
A study recently completed at the University of Helsinki indicates that the gut microbiota of patients suffering from inflammatory gastrointestinal disorders can be used to predict whether they will benefit from expensive therapies. The study also confirms the key role of therapies that have a beneficial effect on the gut microbiota in inflammatory bowel diseases. (2021-01-26)

Less job stress for workers at financially transparent firms
Employees feel significantly less job distress if they work at companies that are open and transparent about the firm's finances, including budgets and profits, a new study found. Researchers examining data from the U.K. found that at companies with more financial transparency, workers felt more secure in their jobs, more committed to their employers and - most significantly - said they had better relationships with their managers. (2021-01-25)

University of Cincinnati research unveils possible new combo therapy for head and neck cancer
Researchers at the University of Cincinnati have tested a new combination therapy in animal models to see if they could find a way to make an already effective treatment even better. Since they're using a Food and Drug Administration-approved drug to do it, this could help people sooner than later. (2021-01-22)

Even a small amount of gender bias in hiring can be costly to employers
Tiny amounts of gender bias in employee hiring decisions contribute to concerning rates of discrimination and productivity losses that together represent significant costs, financial and otherwise, for employers. (2021-01-19)

'Ocean 100': Small group of companies dominates ocean economy
Most of the revenues extracted from use of the world's oceans is concentrated among 100 transnational corporations. Dubbed the ''Ocean 100'' by researchers at Duke University and Stockholm University, these ''blue economy'' companies collectively generated $1.1 trillion in revenues in 2018, according to research published Wednesday in the journal Science Advances. If the group were a country, it would have the world's 16th-largest economy, roughly equivalent to the gross domestic product (GDP) of Mexico. (2021-01-13)

Endocrine Society recommends government negotiation and other policies to lower out-of-pocket costs
The Endocrine Society is calling on policymakers to include government negotiation as part of an overall strategy to reduce insulin prices in its updated position statement published today in The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. (2021-01-12)

SUTD develops new model of influence maximization
The model will enhance the robustness of networks to adversarial attacks and will benefit both practitioners and organizations. (2021-01-12)

Businesses stand to benefit from sustainable restructuring
Is it profitable for a company to switch to sustainable production? Researchers conclude that it probably often is. (2021-01-06)

Investment risk & return from emerging public biotech companies comparable to non-biotech
Investing in biotech companies may not be any riskier than investing in other sectors, according to a new report from Bentley University's Center for Integration of Science and Industry. A large scale study of biotechnology companies that completed Initial Public Offerings (IPOs) from 1997-2016 demonstrates that these companies produced more than $100 billion in shareholder value and almost $100 billion in new value creation despite a failure rate greater than 50%. (2021-01-06)

Majority of biotech companies completing an IPO from 1997-2016 achieved product approvals
A large scale study from Bentley University of the biotechnology companies that completed Initial Public Offerings from 1997-2016 estimates that 78% of these companies are associated with products that reach phase 3 trials and 52% are associated with new product approvals. The article, titled 'Late-stage product development and approvals by biotechnology companies after IPO, 1997-2016,' shows that these emerging, public biotechnology companies continue to have a role in initiating new product development, but are no longer distinctively focused on novel, biological products. (2021-01-06)

UC researcher urges caution using remdesivir to treat COVID-19
Research at the University of Cincinnati, however, contends that this antiviral drug is being used too indiscriminately when treating patients hospitalized with the virus. The study is published in the journal Fundamental & Clinical Pharmacology. (2020-12-29)

NTU Singapore study suggests link between word choices and extraverts
A study by a team of Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) psychologists has found a link between extraverts and their word choices. (2020-12-27)

Satellite data identifies companies fishing in high seas
A team of researchers, using satellite data and other analytical tools, has identified companies fishing in high seas--waters that lie outside of national jurisdiction where fishing has raised fears about environmental and labor violations. (2020-12-18)

Towards circular economy: European manufacturers tend not to report on their actions
After analysing the data from 226 large manufacturing companies from the European Union, a team of researchers from Lithuania, Poland and Sweden have drawn a conclusion that organisations almost do not mention circular economy principles in their environmental reporting. In their reports, the organisations mostly refer to the effective use of primary flows and minimising waste. (2020-12-16)

Ignoring CDC guidelines leads to fear, anger among employees
Companies not following the recommended safety protocols set by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention during the COVID-19 pandemic could have a significant impact on employee trust, loyalty and overall commitment, according to a new study. (2020-12-16)

New recipe for antibiotic could prevent deafness
Stanford Medicine scientists have discovered a simple method of reformulating gentamicin, a commonly used and highly effective antibiotic, that could prevent its toxic side effect of hearing loss. (2020-12-16)

Drug for pulmonary hypertension may become an option against cancer
In experiments by Brazilian researchers with mice and tumor cell lines, the drug showed potential to combat metastasis. The scientists are planning to conduct clinical trials with patients who are on chemotherapy. (2020-12-15)

Social media provides SMEs with tools to mitigate internationalisation-related threats
For SMEs seeking to enter the international markets, social media is a tool for overcoming liabilities connected to their smallness, newness and foreignness, a new study from the University of Eastern Finland shows. (2020-12-10)

Dartmouth researchers work to reduce child-directed food marketing on educational websites
A new article, published in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine by a by a team of researchers and advocates including Dartmouth faculty, asserts that current gaps in the regulation of commercial educational websites are exposing children to unhealthy food marketing. The group is working with major food companies and the USDA to limit these practices. (2020-12-10)

Researchers identify an action mechanism for a drug against Alzheimer' disease
A study conducted on mice published in the journalGeroscience has identified the action mechanism of a promising compound against Alzheimer's disease, developed by the team of Medical Chemistry and Pharmacology at the University of Barcelona. The new drug belongs to a family of molecules that, when bound to imidazole I2 receptors, these cause a reduction in neuroinflammation and an improvement in cognition and other markers of the progression of this disease, the most prevalent among dementias. (2020-12-09)

Hydrogel could open new path for glaucoma treatment without drugs or surgery
Researchers have developed a potential new treatment for the eye disease glaucoma that could replace daily eye drops and surgery with a twice-a-year injection to control the buildup of pressure in the eye. The researchers envision the injection being done as an office procedure that could be part of regular patient visits. (2020-12-07)

Mass incarceration results in significant increases in industrial emissions, study finds
Mass incarceration is as much an environmental problem as it is a social one, according to a new Portland State University study that finds increases in incarceration are significantly associated with increases in industrial emissions. (2020-12-04)

Analysis: talc-based cosmetics test positive for asbestos
Laboratory tests of talc-based cosmetics products, commissioned by the Environmental Working Group, found asbestos -- a deadly human carcinogen for which there is no safe level of exposure -- in almost 15 percent of samples. (2020-11-25)

Simple new testing method aims to improve time-release drugs
UC Riverside engineers filled a glass tube bent like a tuning fork, kept vibrating by a circuit at its resonance frequency, with simulated stomach and intestine contents and passed an over-the-counter time-release drug granule through the tube. They observed a brief change in the frequency. When plotted, they could compare the peaks of resonance frequency against the time to learn the buoyant mass of the drug granule at that moment. (2020-11-24)

Understanding ion channel inhibition to open doors in drug discovery
Scientists have discovered how drug-like small molecules can regulate the activity of therapeutically relevant ion channels - and their findings could transform ongoing drug development efforts. The study reveals how a drug-like small molecule, called Pico145, binds to the TRPC5 channel, thereby preventing the channel from opening.  (2020-11-23)

More than 1.1 million deaths among Medicare recipients due to high cost of drugs
WASHINGTON, DC and SAN DIEGO, CA - Nov. 19, 2020 - More than 1.1 million Medicare patients could die over the next decade because they cannot afford to pay for their prescription medications, according to a new study released today by the West Health Policy Center, a nonprofit and nonpartisan policy research group and Xcenda, the research arm of the drug distributor AmerisourceBergen. (2020-11-19)

UTSA researcher examines drug overdose mortality in the Hispanic community
UTSA researcher Manuel Cano, assistant professor in the Department of Social Work at UTSA is shedding light to understand the topic of drug overdose deaths in the Hispanic community. In the article ''Drug Overdose Deaths Among US Hispanics: Trends (2000-2017) and Recent Patterns'' published in ''Substance Use & Misuse'' Cano used national death certificate data (data recording all deaths of U.S. residents) to examine drug overdose mortality in different Hispanic subgroups, based on heritage, place of birth and gender. (2020-11-18)

One-month of dual anti-platelet therapy is safe and feasible after stent placement
A short, one-month treatment combining antiplatelet medication and aspirin followed by an aspirin-only regime was as effective as a 6- to 12-month course of dual treatment at preventing death, heart attacks, strokes, bleeding or the need for additional stent placement. The results of this study could lead to changes in treatment and improve patient compliance, lower costs and fewer side effects. (2020-11-16)

Approved JAK inhibitor baricitinib shows promise against cytokine storm in COVID-19 clinical study
A clinical study involving 601 patients in Italy and Spain suggests that the JAK inhibitor drug baricitinib may enhance survival rates of patients (2020-11-13)

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