Current Drug Delivery News and Events | Page 24

Current Drug Delivery News and Events, Drug Delivery News Articles.
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Drug-delivery method holds promise for controlling crop parasites
Nematodes cause $157 billion in crop damage annually, largely because traditional pesticides fail to reach plant roots, where the round worms do their damage. In the lab, tobacco mild green mosaic virus nanoparticles carrying a nematicide dispersed better when applied to the soil surface, resulting in more nematicide reaching the root level. The strategy could decrease the amount of pesticides applied to crops, reducing the risk of runoff, the amount of chemicals in produce and grains, and the overall cost of nematode control. (2017-05-31)

Drone vs. truck deliveries: Which create less carbon pollution?
A new study finds that drone deliveries emit less climate-warming carbon dioxide pollution than truck deliveries in some -- but not all -- scenarios. (2017-05-30)

One blood pressure drug therapy associated with lower health-care costs
About half of patients diagnosed with high blood pressure will need their medication adjusted within the first year to address side effects or failure to control blood pressure properly. Among the modification options available, one drug therapy is associated with lower costs for follow-up doctor visits and hospitalizations, according to a new study led by a University of Florida researcher. (2017-05-30)

Nanosubmarine with self-destroying activity
Autonomous targeting and release of drugs at their site of action are desired features of nanomedical systems. Now, a team of Dutch scientists has designed a nanomotor that has these functions: An antitumor drug encapsulated in self-propelled, self-assembled stomatocytes is carried across the cellular membrane and released inside the cell upon a chemical redox signal that disassembles the vesicle membrane. This deliver and unpack nanomedicinal system is introduced in the journal Angewandte Chemie. (2017-05-30)

Study offers guidance for targeting residual ovarian tumors
MIT researchers who are working on an implantable device that could make intraperitoneal chemotherapy more bearable have published a new study that offers insight into how to improve chemotherapy strategies for ovarian cancer, and how to determine which patients would be most likely to benefit from their device. (2017-05-23)

Micro delivery service for fertilizers
Plants can absorb nutrients through their leaves as well as their roots. However, foliar fertilization over an extended period is difficult. In the journal Angewandte Chemie, German researchers have now introduced an efficient delivery system for micronutrients based on biohybrid microgels. Special peptides anchor the 'microcontainers' onto the leaf surface while binding sites inside ensure gradual release of the 'cargo'. (2017-05-22)

Scientists enlist engineered protein to battle the MERS virus
Researchers converted a staple human ubiquitin protein into an anti-viral tool. Through subtle tweaks, they created an engineered version of the ubiquitin that binds more tightly and paralyzes a key enzyme in MERS to halt viral replication in cells. Other synthetic forms of ubiquitin can be quickly generated to target a diverse range of pathogens. (2017-05-19)

The impact of the rise in new drug rejections
The number of new drug applications rejected by the US Food and Drug Administration has been on the rise. The cover story of Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, explores why this is happening and what it means for patients. (2017-05-17)

Oddball enzyme provides easy path to synthetic biomaterials
Materials scientists have written the recipe on how to use an oddball enzyme to build new biomaterials out of DNA. The work provides instructions for researchers the world over to build self-assembling molecules for applications ranging from drug delivery to nanowires. (2017-05-16)

WSU researchers deliver first 'nanotherapeutics' to tumor
For the first time, WSU researchers have demonstrated a way to deliver a drug to a tumor by attaching it to a blood cell. The innovation could let doctors target tumors with anticancer drugs that might otherwise damage healthy tissues. (2017-05-15)

University of Birmingham develops revolutionary eye drops to treat age-related blindness
Scientists at the University of Birmingham have developed a type of eye drop which could potentially revolutionize the treatment of one of the leading causes of blindness in the UK. (2017-05-15)

Corticosteroid treatment increases survival of preterm infants within hours
The effects of corticosteroid treatments on pregnant women facing preterm delivery to prevent infant death and morbidity have been thought to develop gradually over days. However, a new study by researchers at Karolinska Institutet and colleagues in the European EPICE project -- coordinated by Inserm, Paris -- suggests that survival and health gains for very preterm infants may occur within hours. (2017-05-15)

Cutting-edge analysis reveals how different drugs interact with the same target
Osaka University-led researchers identified differences in how three drugs bind to tumor necrosis factor, a key mediator of inflammatory disease. The team used sedimentation velocity analytical ultracentrifugation to investigate drug-target binding in a physiological environment and at clinically-relevant concentrations. They revealed differences between the three drugs in the size and structure of the complexes formed, which may explain differences in the drugs' clinical efficacy. This technique could help optimize future drug design. (2017-05-14)

Hepatitis C increasing among pregnant women
Hepatitis C infections among pregnant women nearly doubled from 2009-2014, likely a consequence of the country's increasing opioid epidemic that is disproportionately affecting rural areas of states including Tennessee and West Virginia. (2017-05-11)

Gene-delivery system prevents vision loss from inherited eye disease
Researchers at Case Western Reserve University have developed gene-carrying nanoparticles that home in on target cells and prevent vision loss in mice with a human form of Leber congenital amaurosis. They believe the technology holds promise for other forms of LCA as well as other inherited diseases that lead to severe vision loss or blindness. (2017-05-10)

Tumor-dwelling immune cells thwart cancer immunotherapy
Researchers have caught tumor-associated immune cells called macrophages in the act of stealing checkpoint inhibitor antibodies away from their intended T cell targets, and blocking this thievery led to improved therapeutic responses in tumor-bearing mice. (2017-05-10)

Experimental technology monitors and maintains drug levels in the body
A new technology can monitor and maintain the level of drug in the bloodstream of animals. If it works in people, it could deliver the optimal dose of life-saving drugs and prevent harmful over- or underdosing. (2017-05-10)

Quit-smoking drug safe for patients with lung disease, study finds
Medication that helps smokers to quit is safe for use by people with chronic lung conditions, research led by the Universities of Edinburgh and Dusseldorf suggests. (2017-05-10)

New nanotechnology application for difficult-to-treat cancers
A new treatment combining shock waves with nanoparticles can successfully treat tumors that are difficult to target using conventional chemotherapy. This is the first time this combined therapy has been tested in live animals. The findings of this pre-clinical study, published in the journal Endocrine-Related Cancer, could lead to the development of more effective therapies for treating life-threatening cancers in the future. (2017-05-09)

New safety concerns identified for 1 in 3 FDA-approved drugs
Nearly 1 out of every 3 drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) have a new safety issue detected in the years after approval, says a Yale-led study. While most of the safety concerns are not serious enough to require withdrawal of a drug from the market, the finding highlights the need for ongoing surveillance of new drugs in the post-market period, said the researchers. (2017-05-09)

Researchers use modified insulin and red blood cells to regulate blood sugar
Researchers have developed a new technique that uses modified insulin and red blood cells to create a glucose-responsive 'smart' insulin delivery system. In an animal model study, the new technique effectively reduced blood sugar levels for 48 hours in a strain of mice that had Type 1 diabetes. (2017-05-08)

Obese women less likely to suffer from dangerous preeclampsia complications
Despite having higher rates of preeclampsia, a dangerous high-blood pressure disorder of late pregnancy, obese women may be less than half as likely to suffer strokes, seizures, and other serious complications of the disorder. (2017-05-05)

Treatment seeks to address exacerbations of COPD
A new study finds that delivery of oxygen via high-flow nasal tubes may help patients who experience exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). (2017-05-04)

PET/CT helps predict therapy effectiveness in pediatric brain tumors
In this first ever molecular drug-imaging study in children, researchers in The Netherlands used whole-body positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) scans to determine whether bevacizumab (Avastin) treatment of diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG) in children is likely to be effective. The study is featured in the May 2017 issue of The Journal of Nuclear Medicine. (2017-05-02)

Treatment of pregnant patients with bone and joint injuries complicated, requires team of physicians
Nearly one in 1,000 pregnant women in the United States suffer bone and joint injuries due to car crashes, domestic violence, drug or alcohol use, or osteoporosis. According to a literature review in the May 2017 issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, the stage of a woman's pregnancy -- how her body may have changed during the course of the pregnancy -- needs to be factored into the mother and fetus' orthopaedic trauma care. (2017-05-01)

Cleveland Clinic discovers opportunities to overcome cancer treatment resistance
A collaborative Cleveland Clinic, University of Oxford and Moffitt Cancer Center team of researchers has proven the theory that, while resistance to targeted treatment in cancer is truly a moving target, there are opportunities to overcome the resistance that develops. (2017-04-27)

Longer-lasting pain relief with MOFs
To treat headaches, back pain or fever, most of us have reached for ibuprofen at one point or another. But we often have to take doses every four to six hours if the pain warrants it. Now scientists are working on a way to package the commonly used drug so it can last longer. Their approach, reported in ACS' journal Molecular Pharmaceutics, could also be used to deliver other drugs orally that currently can only be taken intravenously. (2017-04-26)

Does the microbiome play a role in the effectiveness of colorectal cancer treatment?
A study by UMass Medical School shows that C. elegans, fed a diet of E. coli bacteria, are 100 times more sensitive to the chemotherapy drug floxuridine, commonly used to treat colon cancer, than worms fed different bacteria. These findings suggest that the bacteria residing in your digestive tract may play an important role in your ability to respond to chemotherapy. (2017-04-24)

Mayo research shows surgery adds years for kidney cancer patients
Mayo Clinic researchers have discovered that surgery could more than double life expectancy for many patients with late-stage kidney cancer, giving them anywhere from two to almost 10 years more than they'd have without the surgery. A paper, published recently in The Journal of Urology, found a 'clinically meaningful difference in survival' between renal cell carcinoma patients who had surgery to completely remove secondary tumor growths, called metastases, compared to those who didn't. (2017-04-24)

Anti-viral treatment during pregnancy reduces HBV transmission from mother to child
An analysis of published studies indicates that the antiviral drug tenofovir given to pregnant women in the second or third trimester can help prevent mother to child transmission of the hepatitis B virus (HBV). (2017-04-24)

Antibody delivery mediated by recombinant adeno-associated virus
Monoclonal antibody (mAb) based-therapies have revolutionized treatments of cancer and autoimmune diseases because of their specificity and limited toxicity. (2017-04-21)

New mechanism to fight multi-resistant bacteria revealed
In recent years scientists, clinicians and pharmaceutical companies have been struggling to find new antibiotics or alternative strategies against multi-drug resistant bacteria that represent nowadays a serious health problem. In a breakthrough study now published in PLOS Biology, Isabel Gordo and her team at Instituto Gulbenkian de Ciência (IGC; Portugal) identified a compensatory mechanism in bacteria that might be used in the future as a new therapeutic target against multi-drug resistant bacteria. (2017-04-18)

Electronics to control plant growth
A drug delivery ion pump constructed from organic electronic components also works in plants. Researchers from the Laboratory of Organic Electronics at Linköping University and from the Umeå Plant Science Centre have used such an ion pump to control the root growth of a small flowering plant, the thale cress (Arabidopsis thaliana). (2017-04-17)

Kent State University at Stark research unravels mysteries of mouthparts of butterflies
Matthew S. Lehnert, assistant professor of biological sciences at Kent State University at Stark, has been studying how the mouthparts of butterflies and moths work since 2010. His research shows that the method in which flies and butterflies ingest liquids into their own bodies for nourishment may be used as a model for delivering disease-fighting drugs to the human body. Drug delivery systems are engineered technologies for the targeted delivery and/or controlled release of therapeutic agents. (2017-04-13)

A simple sniff
A team of engineers from Washington University in St. Louis has combined nanoparticles, aerosol science and locusts in new proof-of-concept research that could someday vastly improve drug delivery to the brain, making it as simple as a sniff. (2017-04-12)

IU, Regenstrief study explores adherence and tolerability to Alzheimer's medications
Indiana University Center for Aging Research and Regenstrief Institute researchers have performed first study conducted in US under real-world conditions comparing patient adherence and tolerability to a class of drugs known as cholinesterase inhibitors. Although there are no known cures for Alzheimer's disease or other dementias, drugs in this class may delay or slow progression of symptoms. (2017-04-11)

Money can't buy confidence in birth services, research shows
Cash is not a sufficient incentive for pregnant women in India to take up free institutional delivery services, new research shows. (2017-04-07)

Trial: Abiraterone acetate responses even after initial hormone therapy failure
Results of a 40-person clinical trial published in JAMA Oncology show that 13 percent of prostate cancer patients deemed 'hormone refractory' did, in fact, have strong responses to treatment with the next-generation hormonal drug abiraterone acetate. (2017-04-05)

Could targeting oxtyocin help treat opioid addiction?
A new review of published research indicates that the oxytocin system -- a key player in social reward and stress regulation -- is profoundly affected by opioid use. Therefore, it may be an important target for developing medications to treat opioid addiction and to prevent relapse. (2017-04-05)

New drug delivery system shows promise for fighting solid tumors
A new cancer-drug delivery system shows the ability to exploit the oxygen-poor areas of solid tumors that make the growths resistant to standard chemotherapy and radiation treatment. (2017-04-04)

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