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Current Drug Delivery News and Events, Drug Delivery News Articles.
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Microneedles for therapeutic gene delivery
Researchers develop a minimally invasive biodegradable microneedle patch as a novel delivery mode for gene therapy applications (2020-10-07)

Promising treatment for aggressive childhood cancer
A drug has shown great promise in the treatment of neuroblastoma, an aggressive form of childhood cancer. The study was led by researchers at Lund University in Sweden, and is published in the journal Science Translational Medicine. (2020-10-06)

Mysterious molecular phenomenon could boost precision of targeted drug delivery
Scientists have shown how a type of cellular binding could help pave the way for highly targeted therapies against diseases like cancer. (2020-10-06)

Millimetre-precision drug delivery to the brain
Focused ultrasound waves help ETH researchers to deliver drugs to the brain with pinpoint accuracy, in other words only to where their effect is desired. This method is set to enable treatment of psychiatric and neurological disorders and tumours with fewer side effects in the future. (2020-10-05)

Lego-like assembly of zeolitic membranes improves carbon capture
EPFL chemical engineers have developed a new way to manufacture zeolitic membranes, state-of-the-art materials used for gas separation in harsh conditions. (2020-10-05)

'Like a fishing net,' nanonet collapses to trap drug molecules
Researchers have discovered a new, rapid method for fabricating nanoparticles from a simple, self-assembling polymer, which present new possibilities for diverse applications, including water purification, diagnostics and rapidly generating vaccine formulations. (2020-10-05)

Research shows cell perturbation system could have medical applications
Research by a team from Northwestern Engineering shows that the Nanofountain Probe Electroporation system may lead to quicker and more customized medical treatment plans. (2020-10-02)

Sex-specific adverse drug effects identified by Columbia University algorithm
Columbia University researchers developed an algorithm that uses real-world data to identify sex-specific adverse drug effects, the fourth-leading cause of death in the U.S. (2020-10-02)

A single-application treatment for ear infections that doesn't need refrigeration
Outer ear infections, which affect millions of people each year, are typically caused by the bacteria Pseudomonas aeruginosa or Staphylococcus aureus. Repeatedly administering antibiotic drops, the standard treatment, can be a problem for some people, and the only single-use suspension currently available needs to be kept and handled cold. Now, researchers reporting in ACS Biomaterials Science & Engineering have developed a single-use treatment that doesn't require refrigeration. (2020-09-30)

Scientists propose immune cocktail therapy to boost cancer-immunity cycle in multiple aspects
A research team led by Prof. TIAN Huayu from the Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry (CIAC) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences proposed an innovative immune cocktail therapy that combined ICT along with other therapeutic approaches. The cocktail therapy achieved multiple boosting of the cancer-immunity cycle by utilizing a nano-delivery system. (2020-09-30)

Common antioxidant enzyme may provide potential treatment for COVID-19
Catalase, a naturally occurring enzyme, holds potential as a low-cost therapeutic drug to treat COVID-19 symptoms and suppress the replication of coronavirus inside the body. (2020-09-29)

Study identifies shortcomings in FDA evaluations for new opioid drug approvals over two decades
Approvals of prescription opioids by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration over more than two decades have been based on evaluations in narrowly defined patient groups for which certain safety-related outcomes have been rarely systematically assessed. (2020-09-29)

Opening an autophagy window as the apoptosis door starts to close
Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU) researchers have successfully attached the cancer cell-targeting antibody Trastuzumab to a previously reported supermolecule that induces autophagic cell death. The antibody-drug conjugate (ADC) selectively targeted HER2-overexpressing cancer calls and reduced cell viability at lower concentrations than free supermolecule drug. It is hoped that the ADC will provide a targeted autophagic death route for treating apoptosis resistant cancer cells in vivo, and ultimately provide an alternate approach in the clinic. (2020-09-24)

SARS-CoV-2 during pregnancy was not associated with complications in neonates
In a new study published in the journal JAMA researchers at Karolinska Institutet and Karolinska University Hospital have examined the association between a positive SARS-CoV-2 test during pregnancy and complications in mothers and their newborn babies. Almost two out of three pregnant women who tested positive for SARS-CoV-2 were asymptomatic and the researchers found no higher prevalence of complications during delivery or of ill-health in the neonates. However, preeclampsia was more common in infected women. (2020-09-23)

Negative pressure wound therapy does not cut infection risk in obese women after cesarean
Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) does not appear to lower the risk of infection for obese women after cesarean delivery, suggests a study funded by the National Institutes of Health. The treatment involves placing a low-pressure pump over a closed surgical wound to create negative air pressure. (2020-09-22)

October issue of SLAS Discovery now available
The October edition of SLAS Discovery features the cover article, 'A Critical and Concise Review of Mass Spectrometry Applied to Imaging in Drug Discovery' by Richard J. A. Goodwin Ph.D. (AstraZeneca), Zoltan Takats Ph.D. (Imperial College London), and Josephine Bunch, Ph.D. (National Physical Laboratory). (2020-09-21)

New smart drug delivery system may help treatment for neurological disorders
A Rutgers-led team has created a smart drug delivery system that reduces inflammation in damaged nervous tissues and may help treat spinal cord injuries and other neurological disorders. The system, which uses extremely thin biomaterials implanted in the body, also protects nerve fibers (axons) that connect nerve cells in injured neural tissues, according to a study in the journal Advanced Materials. (2020-09-17)

Many practitioners are not prescribing HIV prevention medication, study finds
Only about 54% of medical practitioners surveyed say they have prescribed pre-exposure prophylaxis, or PrEP, to HIV-vulnerable patients, according to a new study by a Vanderbilt University Medical Center investigator. (2020-09-17)

Scientists updated genome editing technology
International scientific group compared their developed carriers for delivery of genome editing (GE) tools with other available analogues. The research of current studies were published in the in the journal Biomaterials. (2020-09-16)

Rubbery properties help RNA nanoparticles target tumors efficiently and quickly leave body
A new study by researchers at The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center - Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard J. Solove Research Institute shows that RNA nanoparticles have elastic and rubbery properties that help explain why these particles target tumors so efficiently and why they possess lower toxicity in animal studies. (2020-09-14)

Dipanjan Pan demonstrates new method to produce gold nanoparticles in cancer cells
Researchers published a seminal study in Nature Communications that demonstrates for the first time a method of biosynthesizing plasmonic gold nanoparticles within cancer cells, without the need for conventional bench-top lab methods. It has the potential to notably expand biomedical applications. (2020-09-11)

GTEx studies reveal variation in gene expression among individuals and, to small degree, by sex
Seven new studies from Science and Science Advances present the third and final phase of the Genotype-Tissue Expression (GTEx) project, begun over a decade ago by scientists aiming to better understand the effects of genetic diversity in healthy individuals. (2020-09-10)

Drugs bill warning over US/UK trade deal
The NHS would spend billions of pounds more on drugs if it had to pay US prices following a US/UK trade deal. According to a new study by researchers at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston, Harvard Medical School, and the University of Oxford, NHS England would have spent over £5 billion more on 50 brand-name prescription drugs widely used in primary care if it had paid US prices in 2018. (2020-09-10)

Small proteins against SARS-CoV-2 neutralize infection in cell culture
Using innovative computer-based approaches, researchers have developed protein inhibitors that block the interaction between the SARS-CoV-2 virus and human cell receptor ACE2. (2020-09-09)

Temporal-spatial order property of hollow multishelled structures enables sequential drug release
A recent research led by Prof. WANG Dan and Prof. ZHANG Suojiang from the Institute of Process Engineering (IPE) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences studied the diffusion and transport mechanism of antimicrobial molecules through HoMSs, and discovered that the unique temporal-spatial order property of HoMSs can realize the sequential drug release for the first time. (2020-09-08)

New nanosystem from Tel Aviv university enhances treatment for melanoma in animal models
Researchers at Tel Aviv University, led by Prof. Ronit Satchi-Fainaro of TAU's Department of Physiology and Pharmacology at the Sackler School of Medicine, have developed an innovative nanotechnological drug delivery system that significantly enhances the effectiveness of treatment for the aggressive skin cancer melanoma. (2020-09-08)

Chemotherapy drug more effective when combined with microbubbles
Hepatocellular carcinoma is usually treated by blocking the flow of blood to the tumor to induce cancer cell death, but the common treatment, transarterial chemoembolization, is invasive and too imprecise to be a local drug delivery method. Aiming to increase the precision, researchers at Tulane University created a treatment that involves vaporizing tiny droplets of perfluorocarbon, a common organic material composed of carbon and fluorine. The method of gas embolization is published in APL Bioengineering. (2020-09-08)

Genetic study of proteins is a breakthrough in drug development for complex diseases
An innovative genetic study of blood protein levels, led by researchers in the MRC Integrative Epidemiology Unit (MRC-IEU) at the University of Bristol, has demonstrated how genetic data can be used to support drug target prioritisation by identifying the causal effects of proteins on diseases. (2020-09-07)

Tiny biological package gets drug right to the 'heart' of transplant rejection
For patients who receive a heart transplant in the near future, the old adage, 'Good things come in small packages,' may become words to live by. In a recent study, researchers at Johns Hopkins Medicine and the National Cancer Institute (NCI) demonstrated in mice that they can easily deliver a promising anti-rejection drug directly to the area surrounding a grafted heart by packaging it within a tiny three-dimensional, protein gel cocoon known as a hydrogel. (2020-09-03)

Rapid HIV, HCV testing at drug detoxification centers led to higher test result delivery
With an increase in HIV and HCV infections as a consequence of the ongoing opioid epidemic, Boston Medical Center researchers found that only a small number of those who test positive for those infections at a drug detoxification center followed up for a clinical visit after their test. The study results showed that only 6 percent of those tested for HIV and HCV followed up with testing care, despite accessing healthcare multiple times. (2020-09-02)

Antiretroviral therapy fails to treat one-third of HIV patients in Malawi hospital
Antiretroviral therapy (ART) failure and drug resistance are extremely common in patients living with HIV who are admitted to hospital in Malawi, according to new research published in Lancet HIV. (2020-09-02)

One quarter of prescription drugs in Canada may be in short supply
Research from the Centre for Health Evaluation and Outcome Sciences (CHÉOS) sheds new light on the factors behind drug shortages in Canada, a common problem across the country. (2020-09-01)

How antibiotics interact
Understanding bottleneck effects in the translation of bacterial proteins can lead to a more effective combination of antibiotics / study in 'Nature Communications' (2020-08-31)

Researchers explore how retail drone delivery may change logistics networks
Three UT Dallas researchers found that last-mile delivery networks will become more decentralized and the delivery speed of the drones will increase as the technology matures. (2020-08-28)

Antiviral used to treat cat coronavirus also works against SARS-CoV-2
Researchers at the University of Alberta are preparing to launch clinical trials of a drug used to cure a deadly disease caused by a coronavirus in cats that they expect will also be effective as a treatment for humans against COVID-19. (2020-08-27)

Synthetic coating for the GI tract could deliver drugs or aid in digestion
MIT engineers have devised a way to apply a temporary synthetic coating to the lining of the small intestine. This coating could be adapted to deliver drugs, aid in digestion, or prevent nutrients such as glucose from being absorbed. (2020-08-26)

Gastrointestinal innovation holds potential for treating variety of conditions
Proof-of-concept studies in models of lactose intolerance, diabetes and infectious disease demonstrate potential applications. (2020-08-26)

Tethering together type 2 diabetes drugs increases efficacy of combination therapy
Biomedical engineers at Duke University have shown that the effectiveness of a two-pronged type 2 diabetes treatment increases when the drugs are linked by a heat-sensitive tether rather than concurrently administered. The combination molecule forms a gel-like depot under the skin that slowly releases the drug. These findings suggest that this approach to combination drug design could be applied to disease therapies beyond diabetes. (2020-08-26)

New treatment developed by CHOP shows success in high-risk solid tumors
In a breakthrough study, researchers at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) have shown that an enhanced treatment developed in their lab leads to long-term remissions in 80% to 100% of mice with drug-resistant or high-risk solid tumors. The research, which could soon lead to clinical trials, is described in Cancer Research, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research. (2020-08-24)

Mail delays may affect medication supply for nearly 1 in 4 Americans over 50
The timeliness of mail delivery may affect access to medication for many middle-aged and older adults, according to a new analysis of data from a national poll of people aged 50 to 80. Nearly one in four people in this age group said they receive at least one medication by mail, but that percentage rises to 29% when the poll results are limited to people who take at least one prescription medication. (2020-08-24)

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