Current Drug Development News and Events

Current Drug Development News and Events, Drug Development News Articles.
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Tailor-made drugs to treat epilepsy or cardiovascular diseases
In order for a drug to be effective at the right places in the body, it helps if scientists can predict as accurately as possible how the molecules of that drug will interact with human cells. In a joint research project, scientists from Leipzig University and the Chinese Academy of Sciences in Shanghai have succeeded in elucidating such a structure, namely that of the neuropeptide Y receptor Y2 with one of its ligands. (2021-02-10)

The therapeutic potential of peptides
There are more than 80 peptide drugs on the global market and about twice as many in clinical development. Due to their beneficial properties, these biomolecules play already an important role in the treatment of diseases. In Nature Reviews Drug Discovery, a team of Austrian and Australian scientists led by Markus Muttenthaler of the University of Vienna present an outlook on the latest trends in peptide drug discovery and development. (2021-02-10)

Pharmacologist offers plan to solve disparities in designing medicine
In a new perspective piece published in the Feb. 5 issue of Science, Johns Hopkins pharmacologist Namandje Bumpus, Ph.D., outlines the molecular origins for differences in how well certain drugs work among distinct populations. She also lays out a four-part plan to improve the equity of drug development. (2021-02-04)

Novel 3D printed stents deliver breakthrough treatment for oesophageal cancer
World-first 3D printed oesophageal stents developed by the University of South Australia could revolutionise the delivery of chemotherapy drugs to provide more accurate, effective and personalised treatment for patients with oesophageal cancer. (2021-02-02)

BU researchers identify promising therapeutic agent against melanoma
There have been great advances in treating melanoma over the past five years, however, even with these treatments many patients quickly develop drug resistance and die from their disease. A new study from Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) has discovered that a drug (YK-4-279) that was previously created to target one specific type of protein has much broader use against a family of proteins that act to promote melanoma. (2021-02-01)

Drug prices in the U.S. are 2.56 times those in other nations
Prescription drug prices in the United States average 2.56 times those seen in 32 other high-income nations, according to a new analysis. The gap between prices in the U.S. and other countries is even larger for brand-named drugs, with U.S. prices averaging 3.44 times those in comparison nations. (2021-01-28)

Pharmaceutical research: when active substance and target protein 'embrace' each other
Scientists at Goethe University Frankfurt, together with colleagues from Darmstadt, Heidelberg, Oxford and Dundee (UK), have investigated how the fit of potent inhibitors to their binding sites can be optimised so that they engage longer with their target proteins. Long target residency has been associated with more efficient pharmacological responses e.g. in cancer therapy. In future, the researchers want to use computer simulations to predict the residence time of inhibitors during drug development. (2021-01-28)

Gut microbiota reveals whether drug therapies work in inflammatory bowel diseases
A study recently completed at the University of Helsinki indicates that the gut microbiota of patients suffering from inflammatory gastrointestinal disorders can be used to predict whether they will benefit from expensive therapies. The study also confirms the key role of therapies that have a beneficial effect on the gut microbiota in inflammatory bowel diseases. (2021-01-26)

Researchers develop promising way to find new cancer drugs
The enzymes in human cells known as histone deacetylases, or HDACs, are targets for a handful of anticancer drugs because of their ability to affect gene expression. Now, researchers from the University of Copenhagen have developed a new method to investigate how these enzymes work on a molecular level. This new method can also help identify more precise possible anti-cancer drug candidates at a very high pace. (2021-01-25)

In preclinical models, antiviral better inhibits COVID-19 than Remdesivir; further studies warranted
Working in preclinical models, researchers report that plitidepsin, a drug with limited clinical approval for the treatment of multiple myeloma, is more potent against SARS-CoV-2 than remdesivir, an antiviral that received FDA emergency use authorization for the treatment of COVID-19 in 2020. (2021-01-25)

Bioorthogonally catalyzed lethality strategy generates targeting drugs within tumor
Selectively killing tumor while not causing damage to normal cells still remains a challenge in cancer chemotherapy. Professor Hongke Liu from Nanjing Normal University together with Professor Jing Zhao and Professor Zijian Guo from Nanjing University developed a novel strategy---bioorthogonally-catalyzed lethality to generate efficient anticancer species between two non-toxic components only within cancer cells and tumors without external catalysts, realizing the precise and efficient anticancer chemotherapy. (2021-01-25)

Cholesterol starvation kills lymphoma cells
Scientists have developed a novel therapy to trick cancer cells into gobbling up what they think is their favorite food - cholesterol -- which actually triggers their destruction. What appears to them as a cholesterol-loaded particle is actually a synthetic nanoparticle that binds to the cancer cells and starves them to death. The study was in lymphoma cells but could be effective in ovarian and kidney cancer. (2021-01-25)

University of Cincinnati research unveils possible new combo therapy for head and neck cancer
Researchers at the University of Cincinnati have tested a new combination therapy in animal models to see if they could find a way to make an already effective treatment even better. Since they're using a Food and Drug Administration-approved drug to do it, this could help people sooner than later. (2021-01-22)

Proposing a new drug to treat tuberculosis utilizing state-of-the-art computer simulations
Research team lead by Toyohashi University of Technology have proposed a new drug to treat tuberculosis. This drug may inhibit the cell division of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis) and suppress its growth. In addition, because this drug acts on the enzymes secreted by M. tuberculosis, M. tuberculosis has very little chance of mutation and develops no drug resistance. Therefore, it's expected this drug will lead to a novel drug that will keep its effectiveness. (2021-01-18)

Heat treatment may make chemotherapy more effective
The study, published in the Journal of Materials Chemistry B, found that ''loading'' a chemotherapy drug on to tiny magnetic particles that can heat up the cancer cells at the same time as delivering the drug to them was up to 34% more effective at destroying the cancer cells than the chemotherapy drug without added heat. (2021-01-05)

UC researcher urges caution using remdesivir to treat COVID-19
Research at the University of Cincinnati, however, contends that this antiviral drug is being used too indiscriminately when treating patients hospitalized with the virus. The study is published in the journal Fundamental & Clinical Pharmacology. (2020-12-29)

Experimental evolution reveals how bacteria gain drug resistance
A research team at RIKEN in Japan has succeeded in experimentally evolving the common bacteria under pressure from a large number of individual antibiotics, and identified the mechanisms and constraints underlying evolved drug resistance. Their findings help develop drug-treatment strategies that minimize the chance that bacteria will develop resistance. (2020-11-24)

Potential new target to combat inflammatory diseases
An international team of researchers have uncovered a drug-like compound that blocks a crucial inflammatory pathway, potentially paving the way for a new treatment for a host of diseases - including COVID-19. WEHI's Associate Professor Seth Masters and his research team discovered the compound could prevent up-regulation of CD14, a key inflammatory protein. The discovery was recently published in EBioMedicine. (2020-11-19)

UTSA researcher examines drug overdose mortality in the Hispanic community
UTSA researcher Manuel Cano, assistant professor in the Department of Social Work at UTSA is shedding light to understand the topic of drug overdose deaths in the Hispanic community. In the article ''Drug Overdose Deaths Among US Hispanics: Trends (2000-2017) and Recent Patterns'' published in ''Substance Use & Misuse'' Cano used national death certificate data (data recording all deaths of U.S. residents) to examine drug overdose mortality in different Hispanic subgroups, based on heritage, place of birth and gender. (2020-11-18)

December special issue of SLAS Discovery features 'drug discovery targeting COVID-19'
The December edition of SLAS Discovery, ''Drug Discovery Targeting COVID-19'' is a special collection assembled by Associate Editor Timothy Spicer (Scripps, FL, USA), focusing on drug discovery efforts toward the current global pandemic of COVID-19caused by the novel coronavirus, SARS-CoV-2. (2020-11-17)

'Alarming' COVID-19 study shows 80% of respondents report significant symptoms of depression
A new national survey, looking at how the COVID-19 pandemic has impacted young US adults' loneliness, reveals ''significant depressive symptoms'' in 80% of participants. (2020-11-16)

Trifarotene in moderate acne: No study data for the assessment of the added benefit
Trifarotene in moderate acne: no study data for the assessment of the added benefit. Although acne affects many people and there are treatment alternatives, the new drug was only compared with placebo in the approval studies. (2020-11-16)

Approved JAK inhibitor baricitinib shows promise against cytokine storm in COVID-19 clinical study
A clinical study involving 601 patients in Italy and Spain suggests that the JAK inhibitor drug baricitinib may enhance survival rates of patients (2020-11-13)

Interactive virtual reality emerges as a new tool for drug design against COVID-19
Bristol scientists have demonstrated a new virtual reality [VR] technique which should help in developing drugs against the SARS-CoV-2 virus - and enable researchers to share models and collaborate in new ways. The innovative tool, created by University of Bristol researchers, and published in the Journal of Chemical Information and Modeling, will help scientists around the world identify anti-viral drug leads more rapidly. (2020-11-12)

Sugar-coated viral proteins hijack and hitch a ride out of cells
Many viruses - including coronaviruses ¬- have protective outer layer made of proteins, fats and sugars. New research shows targeting sugar production has potential for broad-spectrum antiviral drugs (2020-11-05)

Researchers show how to target a shape-shifting protein in Alzheimer's disease
A new study suggests that it is possible to design drugs that can target a type of shape-shifting protein involved in Alzheimer's disease, which was previously thought to be undruggable. (2020-11-04)

Machine learning that predicts anti-cancer drug efficacy
Research on anti-cancer drug response in patient-derived artificial organoids and transcriptome learning of genes associated with anti-cancer target proteins. (2020-11-01)

Beetroot peptide as potential drug candidate for treating diseases
In a recent study, a research group led by Christian Gruber at MedUni Vienna's Institute of Pharmacology isolated a peptide (small protein molecule) from beetroot. The peptide is able to inhibit a particular enzyme that is responsible for the breakdown of messenger molecules in the body. Due to its particularly stable molecular structure and pharmacological properties, the beetroot peptide may be a good candidate for development of a drug to treat certain inflammatory diseases, such as e.g. neurodegenerative and autoimmune diseases. (2020-10-30)

'Time machine' offers new pancreatic cancer drug testing approach
Drug resistance is a major reason why pancreatic cancer has a five-year survival rate of only about 10%. If scientists tested potential drugs on multiple tumor cell subtypes rather than on just one subtype, they may be able to catch resistance better, suggests a ''time machine'' developed by Purdue University engineers. (2020-10-29)

Computer vision helps find binding sites in drug targets
Scientists from the iMolecule group at Skoltech developed BiteNet, a machine learning (ML) algorithm that helps find drug binding sites, i.e. potential drug targets, in proteins. BiteNet can analyze 1,000 protein structures in 1.5 minutes and find optimal spots for drug molecules to attach. (2020-10-27)

New blood cancer treatment works by selectively interfering with cancer cell signalling
University of Alberta scientists have identified the mechanism of action behind a new type of precision cancer drug for blood cancers that is set for human trials, according to research published in Nature Communications. (2020-10-22)

New drug that can prevent the drug resistance and adverse effects
A research team in Korea is garnering attention for having developed an anticancer drug that could potentially prevent drug resistance. The Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST) announced that a team of researchers led by Dr. Kwang-meyung Kim at the Theragnosis research center successfully developed a cancer-specific anticancer drug precursor that can prevent the drug resistance. (2020-10-21)

New dimensions in the treatment of muscle spasticity after stroke and nervous system defects
Chronic muscle spasticity after nervous system defects like stroke, traumatic brain and spinal cord injury, multiple sclerosis and painful low back pain affect more than 10% of the population, with a socioeconomic cost of about 500 billion USD. Currently, there is no satisfying remedy to help these suffering people, which generates an immense medical need for a new generation antispastic drug. Drug candidate MPH-220 could mean new hope for millions of patients suffering from spasticity. (2020-10-16)

Study shows proof of concept of BioIVT HEPATOPAC cultures with targeted assay to evaluate bioactivation potential and drug-induced liver injury (DILI) risk
New in vitro Bioactivation Liver Response Assay used HEPATOPAC model to demonstrate utility of in vitro transcriptomic signature-based strategy in preclinical DILI risk assessment. (2020-10-12)

Promising treatment for aggressive childhood cancer
A drug has shown great promise in the treatment of neuroblastoma, an aggressive form of childhood cancer. The study was led by researchers at Lund University in Sweden, and is published in the journal Science Translational Medicine. (2020-10-06)

Sex-specific adverse drug effects identified by Columbia University algorithm
Columbia University researchers developed an algorithm that uses real-world data to identify sex-specific adverse drug effects, the fourth-leading cause of death in the U.S. (2020-10-02)

A cancer shredder
Researchers at the universities of Würzburg and Frankfurt (Germany) have developed a new compound for treating cancer. It destroys a protein that triggers its development. (2020-09-29)

Drug for common liver condition may be an effective treatment for dementia
A team of researchers, led by the University of York, have identified new proteins involved in protecting neurons and discovered that Ursodeoxycholic Acid - an already approved drug, with very low toxicity - increases these proteins and protects neurons from death. (2020-09-14)

Drugs bill warning over US/UK trade deal
The NHS would spend billions of pounds more on drugs if it had to pay US prices following a US/UK trade deal. According to a new study by researchers at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston, Harvard Medical School, and the University of Oxford, NHS England would have spent over £5 billion more on 50 brand-name prescription drugs widely used in primary care if it had paid US prices in 2018. (2020-09-10)

New tool outsmarts COVID-19 virus to help vaccine development
Melbourne researchers have developed a tool to monitor mutations that make it difficult to develop coronavirus (COVID-19) vaccines and drugs. Ensuring treatments remain effective as the virus mutates is a huge challenge for researchers. The powerful new tool harnesses genomic and protein information about the virus and its mutations to aid drug and vaccine development. (2020-09-09)

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