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Current Earth News and Events, Earth News Articles.
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The universe is getting hot, hot, hot, a new study suggests
The universe is getting hotter, a new study has found. The study, published Oct. 13 in the Astrophysical Journal, probed the thermal history of the universe over the last 10 billion years. It found that the mean temperature of gas across the universe has increased more than 10 times over that time period and reached about 2 million degrees Kelvin today -- approximately 4 million degrees Fahrenheit. (2020-11-10)

A new model found to predict earthquake propagation speed
In an article published on November 9th in Nature Geoscience, Jean-Paul Ampuero and Huihui Weng, two researchers from Université Côte d'Azur and the French National Research Institute for Sustainable Development (IRD-France) propose a new model to predict the propagation speed of earthquakes. (2020-11-09)

Distinct slab interfaces found within mantle transition zone
Prof. CHEN Qifu's group from the Institute of Geology and Geophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (IGGCAS) and their collaborators observed two distinct seismic discontinuities within the mantle transition zone (~410 km to 660 km) beneath the western Pacific. (2020-11-09)

The craters on Earth
A two-volume atlas presents and explains the impact sites of meteorites and asteroids worldwide (2020-11-03)

New mineral discovered in moon meteorite
The high-pressure mineral Donwilhelmsite, recently discovered in the lunar meteorite Oued Awlitis 001 from Apollo missions, is important for understanding the inner structure of the earth. (2020-11-03)

"Fireball" meteorite contains pristine extraterrestrial organic compounds
A fireball meteorite fell onto a frozen lake in Michigan, and since it was quickly collected before getting exposed to liquid water, it gives scientists a glimpse of what space rocks are like when they're still in space. Researchers found that it contains pristine organic compounds that could tell us about the origins of life on Earth. (2020-10-27)

A new way of looking at the Earth's interior
Current understanding is that the chemical composition of the Earth's mantle is relatively homogeneous. But experiments conducted by ETH researchers now show that this view is too simplistic. Their results solve a key problem facing the geosciences - and raise some new questions. (2020-10-21)

Smile, wave: Some exoplanets may be able to see us, too
Three decades after Cornell astronomer Carl Sagan suggested that Voyager 1 snap Earth's picture from billions of miles away - resulting in the iconic Pale Blue Dot photograph - two astronomers now offer another unique cosmic perspective: Some exoplanets - planets from beyond our own solar system - have a direct line of sight to observe Earth's biological qualities from far, far away. (2020-10-21)

Lost and found: UH geologists 'resurrect' missing tectonic plate
A team of geologists at the University of Houston College of Natural Sciences and Mathematics believes they have found the lost plate known as Resurrection in northern Canada by using existing mantle tomography images. (2020-10-20)

Microbial diversity below seafloor is as rich as on Earth's surface
For the first time, researchers have mapped the biological diversity of marine sediment, one of Earth's largest global biomes. The research team discovered that microbial diversity in the dark, energy-limited world beneath the seafloor is as diverse as in Earth's surface biomes. (2020-10-20)

Climate change likely drove early human species to extinction, modeling study suggests
Of the six or more different species of early humans, all belonging to the genus Homo, only we Homo sapiens have managed to survive. Now, a study reported in the journal One Earth combining climate modeling and the fossil record in search of clues to what led to all those earlier extinctions suggests that climate change--the inability to adapt to either warming or cooling temperatures--likely played a major role in sealing their fate. (2020-10-15)

The mountains of Pluto are snowcapped, but not for the same reasons as on Earth
In 2015, the New Horizons space probe discovered spectacular snowcapped mountains on Pluto, which are strikingly similar to mountains on Earth. Such a landscape had never before been observed elsewhere in the Solar System. An international team led by CNRS scientists determined that the methane snow could only appear at the peaks of Pluto's mountains high enough to reach this enriched zone that the air contains enough methane for it to condense. (2020-10-13)

Geologists solve puzzle that could predict valuable rare earth element deposits
Pioneering new research has helped geologists solve a long-standing puzzle that could help pinpoint new, untapped concentrations of some the most valuable rare earth deposits. (2020-10-09)

Some planets may be better for life than Earth
Researchers have identified two dozen planets outside our solar system that may have conditions more suitable for life than our own. Some of these orbit stars that may be better than even our sun. (2020-10-05)

Stellar explosion in Earth's proximity
When the brightness of the star Betelgeuse dropped dramatically a few months ago, some observers suspected an impending supernova - a stellar explosion that could also cause damage on Earth. While Betelgeuse has returned to normal, physicists from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have found evidence of a supernova that exploded near the Earth around 2.5 million years ago. (2020-09-30)

Planet collision simulations give clues to atmospheric loss from Moon's origin
Earth could have lost anywhere between ten and 60 per cent of its atmosphere in the collision that is thought to have formed the Moon. (2020-09-29)

Simpler models may be better for determining some climate risk
Typically, computer models of climate become more and more complex as researchers strive to capture more details of our Earth's system, but according to a team of Penn State researchers, to assess risks, less complex models, with their ability to better sample uncertainties, may be a better choice. (2020-09-24)

Uncovering new understanding of Earth's carbon cycle
A new study led by a University of Alberta PhD student--and published in Nature--is examining the Earth's carbon cycle in new depth, using diamonds as breadcrumbs of insight into some of Earth's deepest geologic mechanisms. (2020-09-23)

Solving the strange storms on Jupiter
Geometric storm patterns on Jupiter's south pole have been a mystery to scientists, but Caltech researchers may have uncovered how they form. (2020-09-23)

Living in an anoxic world: Microbes using arsenic are a link to early life
Much of life on planet Earth today relies on oxygen to exist, but before oxygen was present on our blue planet, lifeforms likely used arsenic instead. These findings are detailed in research published today in Communications Earth and Environment. (2020-09-22)

Comet Chury's ultraviolet aurora
On Earth, auroras, also called northern lights, have always fascinated people. An international consortium involving the University of Bern has now discovered such auroras in the ultraviolet wavelength range at comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, Chury for short. This phenomenon was detected thanks to the analysis of data from the European Space Agency ESA's Rosetta mission. (2020-09-21)

Solar storm forecasts for Earth improved with help from the public
Scientists used observations recorded by members of the public to increase accuracy of computer model predictions of when harmful CMEs will hit Earth. (2020-09-18)

Mapping the 1.6 billion people who live near forests
Global maps of places where people and forests coexist show that an estimated 1.6 billion people live within 5 kilometers of a forest. The assessment, based on data from 2000 and 2012 and published September 18 in the journal One Earth, showed that of these 1.6 billion ''forest-proximate people,'' 64.5 percent were located in tropical countries, and 71.3 percent lived in countries classified as low or middle income by the World Bank. (2020-09-18)

More than 90% of protected areas are disconnected
Ongoing land clearing for agriculture, mining and urbanisation is isolating and disconnecting Earth's protected natural areas from each other, a new study shows. Lead author Michelle Ward, from The University of Queensland's School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, said the findings were ''alarming''. (2020-09-11)

Carbon-rich exoplanets may be made of diamonds
In a new study published recently in The Planetary Science Journal, a team of researchers from Arizona State University and the University of Chicago have determined that some carbon-rich exoplanets, given the right circumstances, could be made of diamonds and silica. (2020-09-11)

Understanding the 'deep-carbon cycle'
New geologic findings about the makeup of the Earth's mantle are helping scientists better understand long-term climate stability and even how seismic waves move through the planet's layers. (2020-09-10)

In the line of fire
People are starting almost all the wildfires that threaten US homes, according to an innovative new analysis combining housing and wildfire data. Through activities like debris burning, equipment use and arson, humans were responsible for igniting 97% of home-threatening wildfires, a University of Colorado Boulder-led team reported this week in the journal Fire. (2020-09-10)

66 million years of Earth's climate uncovered from ocean sediments
Changes in the Earth's climate over the last 66 million years have been revealed in unprecedented detail by a team involving UCL researchers, highlighting four distinctive climatic states and the natural million- and thousand-year variability that Earth's climate has experienced. (2020-09-10)

Climate changed in steps in the past
An international study published in Science significantly improves the potential for understanding how the Earth's climate system evolved over the past 66 million years. The work reveals that the Earth system shifted abruptly between 4 distinct modes: hothouse, warmhouse, coolhouse, and icehouse during the period. The EU Horizon 2020 TiPES project contributed to the results. (2020-09-10)

Has Earth's oxygen rusted the Moon for billions of years?
To the surprise of many planetary scientists, the oxidized iron mineral hematite has been discovered at high latitudes on the Moon, according to a study led by University of Hawaii researchers. (2020-09-02)

Graduate student names new trace fossil discovered during coursework
University of Alberta graduate student Scott Melnyk made an intriguing fossil find during a graduate level course--and ended up identifying the fossilized tracks of a newly discovered wood-boring organism in a new study. (2020-09-01)

NASA finds Typhoon Maysak moving near Okinawa, Japan
Typhoon Maysak continued to move through the Northwestern Pacific and was closing in on Japan's Okinawa Island when NASA's Terra satellite obtained a visible image of the storm. Maysak's eye is not expected to go over the island, but pass just west of it. (2020-08-31)

Unexpected abundance of hydrogen in meteorites reveals the origin of Earth's water
Meteorite material presumed to be devoid of water because it formed in the dry inner Solar System appears to have contained sufficient hydrogen to have delivered to Earth at least three times the mass of water in its oceans, a new study shows. (2020-08-27)

Meteorite study suggests Earth may have been wet since it formed
A new study finds that Earth's water may have come from materials that were present in the inner solar system at the time the planet formed -- instead of far-reaching comets or asteroids delivering such water. The findings published Aug. 28 in Science suggest that Earth may have always been wet. (2020-08-27)

Earth may always have been wet
The Earth is the only planet known to have liquid water on its surface, a fundamental characteristic when it comes to explaining the emergence of life. However, its origin is still debated. In the journal Science dated 28 August 2020, scientists from the CNRS and Université de Lorraine contribute to this debate by showing that most of the water present on the Earth today has probably been there right from the very beginning. (2020-08-27)

NASA sees typhoon Bavi from one million miles away
Typhoon Bavi is a large storm moving through the Yellow Sea. A NASA camera captured an image of the Northwestern Pacific Ocean that showed Bavi headed north. (2020-08-26)

Ancient star explosions revealed in the deep sea
A mystery surrounding the space around our solar system is unfolding thanks to evidence of supernovae found in deep-sea sediments. (2020-08-24)

Discovery lays blame on supernova for extinction event nearly 360 million years ago
Between a decline in biodiversity and a series of extinction events, the Late Devonian period was not the most hospitable time on Earth. And then came one or more supernovae explosions whose resulting ionizing radiation was the final push that spelled the end for armored fish, most trilobites and other life. (2020-08-20)

Harmonizing models and observations by Earth system science data assimilation
The data assimilation (DA), which enabled models and observations cooperate with each other in harmony, has the potential to become a common methodology for Earth system science (ESS) overall and its branches. Now, researchers analyzes the development of DA theories and methods from various perspectives, including applications in the main fields of ESS, the origins of the research paradigm, the evolution of theories and methods, and future trends and challenges. (2020-08-17)

Reconstructing global climate through Earth's history
Accurate temperature estimates of ancient oceans are vital because they are the best tool for reconstructing global climate conditions in the past. While climate models provide scenarios of what the world could look like in the future, paleoclimate studies (study of past climates) provide insight into what the world did look like in the past. (2020-08-13)

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