Current Earthquake News and Events

Current Earthquake News and Events, Earthquake News Articles.
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Seismic activity of New Zealand's alpine fault more complex than suspected
New evidence of a 19th century earthquake on New Zealand's Alpine fault suggests that in at least one portion of the fault, smaller earthquakes may occur in between such large rupture events. (2020-12-01)

A dessert-like desert: Californian lithosphere resembles crème brûlée
A model for the southeastern California lithosphere suggests that a strong upper crust overlies weaker lower rock layers. (2020-11-30)

Earthquake scenario for large German city
What if there is a major earthquake near Cologne? This scenario is subject of the ''Risk Analysis in Civil Protection 2019'' report that was recently submitted to the German Bundestag. On the basis of extensive research, experts have listed in detail effects to be expected. What Germans usually only know from abroad results from modeling a strong earthquake near the megacity of Cologne: ground shaking, damaged and destroyed houses, blocked roads, many injured and dead. (2020-11-30)

Seismic guidelines underestimate impact of 'The Big One' on metro Vancouver buildings
Scientists examining the effects of a megathrust earthquake in the Pacific Northwest say tall buildings across Metro Vancouver will experience greater shaking than currently accounted for by Canada's national seismic hazard model. (2020-11-30)

Piecing together the Alaska coastline's fractured volcanic activity
Among seismologists, the geology of Alaska's earthquake- and volcano-rich coast from the Aleutian Islands to the southeast is fascinating, but not well understood. Now, with more sophisticated tools than before, a University of Massachusetts Amherst team reports unexpected new details about the area's tectonic plates and their relationships to volcanoes. (2020-11-17)

Landslide along Alaskan fjord could trigger tsunami
Scientists noted that the slope on Barry Arm fjord on Prince William Sound in southeastern Alaska slid some 120 meters from 2010 to 2017, a slow-moving landslide caused by glacial melt that could trigger a devastating tsunami. These are some of the first measurements to quantify how the slope is falling there; the study also models a potential tsunami. (2020-11-12)

A new model found to predict earthquake propagation speed
In an article published on November 9th in Nature Geoscience, Jean-Paul Ampuero and Huihui Weng, two researchers from Université Côte d'Azur and the French National Research Institute for Sustainable Development (IRD-France) propose a new model to predict the propagation speed of earthquakes. (2020-11-09)

Distinct slab interfaces found within mantle transition zone
Prof. CHEN Qifu's group from the Institute of Geology and Geophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (IGGCAS) and their collaborators observed two distinct seismic discontinuities within the mantle transition zone (~410 km to 660 km) beneath the western Pacific. (2020-11-09)

Smaller earthquakes "with ambition" produce the most ground shaking
An earthquake of magnitude 8.0 or larger will almost always cause strong shaking, but a new study suggests that smaller earthquakes--those around magnitude 5.5 or so--are the cause of most occurrences of strong shaking at a 60-kilometer (37-mile) distance. (2020-11-04)

Bridges with limb-inspired architecture can withstand earthquakes, cut repair costs
Structural damage to any of the nation's ailing bridges can come with a hefty price of billions of dollars in repairs. New bridge designs promise more damage-resistant structures and, consequently, lower restoration costs. But if these designs haven't been implemented in the real world, predicting how they can be damaged and what repair strategies should be implemented remain unresolved. (2020-10-26)

Ancient lake contributed to past San Andreas fault ruptures
he San Andreas fault, which runs along the western coast of North America and crosses dense population centers like Los Angeles, California, is one of the most-studied faults in North America because of its significant hazard risk. Based on its roughly 150-year recurrence interval for magnitude 7.5 earthquakes and the fact that it's been over 300 years since that's happened, the southern San Andreas fault has long been called 'overdue' for such an earthquake. (2020-10-26)

AI detects hidden earthquakes
Tiny movements in Earth's outermost layer may provide a Rosetta Stone for deciphering the physics and warning signs of big quakes. New algorithms that work a little like human vision are now detecting these long-hidden microquakes in the growing mountain of seismic data. (2020-10-22)

A new technique predicts how earthquakes would affect a city's hospitals
An international research team led by the Stanford Blume Center for Earthquake Engineering has developed a methodology to help disaster preparedness officials in large cities make contingency plans on a region-wide basis to make sure that emergency responders can get patients to the hospital facilities that are likeliest to remain in commission after a quake. (2020-10-22)

New evidence for geologically recent earthquakes near Portland, Oregon metro area
A paleoseismic trench dug across the Gales Creek fault, located about 35 kilometers (roughly 22 miles) west of Portland, Oregon, documents evidence for three surface-rupturing earthquakes that took place about 8,800, 4,200 and 1,000 years ago. (2020-10-20)

Deep learning artificial intelligence keeps an eye on volcano movements
RADAR satellites can collect massive amounts of remote sensing data that can detect ground movements -- surface deformations -- at volcanoes in near real time. These ground movements could signal impending volcanic activity and unrest; however, clouds and other atmospheric and instrumental disturbances can introduce significant errors in those ground movement measurements. Now, Penn State researchers have used artificial intelligence (AI) to clear up that noise, drastically facilitating and improving near real-time observation of volcanic movements and the detection of volcanic activity and unrest. (2020-10-15)

Magnitude comparison distinguishes small earthquakes from explosions in US west
By comparing two magnitude measurements for seismic events recorded locally, researchers can tell whether the event was a small earthquake or a single-fire buried chemical explosion. (2020-10-13)

EPFL scientist gains fresh insight into the origins of earthquakes
The speed and intensity with which seismic waves propagate after an earthquake depend mainly on forces occurring deep inside the rocks along a fault line, according to a study by EPFL scientist François Passelègue. His sophisticated models are giving us fresh insight into the factors that can trigger an earthquake. (2020-10-12)

Unusually shallow earthquake ruptures in Chinese fracking field
An unusually shallow earthquake triggered by hydraulic fracturing in a Chinese shale gas field could change how experts view the risks of fracking for faults that lie very near the Earth's surface. (2020-10-07)

Earthquake forecasting clues unearthed in strange precariously balanced rocks
Naturally formed balancing boulders could be used to help scientists to forecast large earthquakes more precisely. (2020-10-01)

Research may curb economic losses to power plants after earthquakes
Sitting atop power transformers are bushing systems that play a critical role in supplying communities with electricity. However, these objects are also susceptible to breaking during earthquakes. Once damaged, bushings can cause widespread outages and burden a state with expensive repairs. (2020-10-01)

Network reveals large variations in shaking in LA basin after Ridgecrest earthquake
The 2019 Ridgecrest earthquake sequence has revealed areas of the Los Angeles basin where the amplification of shaking of high-rise buildings is greatest, according to a new report in Seismological Research Letters. (2020-09-30)

Earthquake lightning: Mysterious luminescence phenomena
Photoemission induced by rock fracturing can occur as a result of landslides associated with earthquakes. Factors involved in such earthquake lightnings were studied with granite, rhyolite, pyroclastic rock and limestone. (2020-09-28)

How earthquake swarms arise
A new fault simulator maps out how interactions between pressure, friction and fluids rising through a fault zone can lead to slow-motion quakes and seismic swarms. (2020-09-24)

Flood risks: More accurate data due to COVID-19
Emerging use of Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) makes it possible to continuously measure shallow changes in elevation of Earth surface. A study by the University of Bonn now shows that the quality of these measurements may have improved significantly during the pandemic, at least at some stations. The results show which factors should be considered in the future when installing GPS antennas. (2020-09-23)

Seismic data explains continental collision beneath Tibet
New imagery reveals the causes of seismic activity deep beneath the Himalaya region, contributing to an ongoing debate over the continental collision process when two tectonic plates crash into each other. (2020-09-22)

Undersea earthquakes shake up climate science
Sound generated by seismic events on the seabed can be used to determine the temperature of Earth's warming oceans. (2020-09-18)

Detaching and uplifting, not bulldozing
ETH researchers have used a computer model to test a new hypothesis about the formation of the Alps while simulating seismic activity in Switzerland. This will help improve current earthquake risk models. (2020-09-17)

Most landslides in western Oregon triggered by heavy rainfall, not big earthquakes
Deep-seated landslides in the central Oregon Coast Range are triggered mostly by rainfall, not by large offshore earthquakes. (2020-09-16)

Ancient earthquake may have caused destruction of Canaanite palace at Tel Kabri
A team of Israeli and American researchers has uncovered new evidence that an earthquake may have caused the destruction and abandonment of a flourishing Canaanite palatial site about 3,700 years ago. (2020-09-11)

Deep underground forces explain quakes on San Andreas Fault
Rock-melting forces occurring much deeper in the Earth than previously understood drive tremors along a segment of the San Andreas Fault near Parkfield, Calif., new USC research shows. (2020-09-04)

The Le Teil earthquake provides new insights on seismic risk in France and Western Europe
On 11 November 2019, a magnitude 5 earthquake occurred near the village of Le Teil in the Rhône River Valley in southern France producing an unexpected surface rupture with ground displacement. For the first time in France, scientists had the opportunity to use all modern seismological, geodetical, and geological techniques available to study this historically unprecedented seismic event. Their results appear on 27 August 2020 in Communications Earth & Environment. (2020-08-27)

Rare 'boomerang' earthquake observed along Atlantic Ocean fault line
Scientists have tracked a 'boomerang' earthquake in the ocean for the first time, providing clues about how they could cause devastation on land. (2020-08-10)

Citizen scientists help geologists to identify earthquakes and tectonic tremors
A new study shows that citizen scientists can help professionals in identifying seismic events. Citizens not only identified earthquakes, but collectively also mastered the difficult task of recognizing tremors, which previously could only be done by professional seismologists. Through the manual classification of seismic Big Data, citizens can help scientists to build catalogs and map seismic activity and become better at understanding earthquakes. (2020-08-06)

Researchers: What's in oilfield wastewater matters for injection-induced earthquakes
Specifically, he pointed out that oilfield brine has much different properties, like density and viscosity, than pure water, and these differences affect the processes that cause fluid pressure to trigger earthquakes. (2020-08-06)

Optical seismometer survives "hellish" summit of Caribbean volcano
The heights of La Soufrière de Guadeloupe volcano can be hellish, sweltering at more than 48 degrees Celsius (120 degrees Fahrenheit) and swathed in billows of acidic gas. Researchers would like to monitor gas and steam eruptions at its summit, to learn more about the volcano's explosive potential, but conventional seismometers are destroyed quickly in the hostile environment. (2020-08-05)

"Inchworm" pattern of Indonesian earthquake rupture powered seismic "boom"
A sonic boom-like seismic phenomenon of supershear rupture occurred during the 2018 Palu earthquake in Indonesia. University of Tsukuba researchers investigated the relationship between this phenomenon and the complex geometry of the Palu-Koro fault. An ''inchworm-like'' pattern of repeated rupture deceleration and acceleration along the fault was detected, associated with bends in the fault trace. This slip evolution may have enhanced the propagation of supershear rupture and contributed to the generation of the 2018 Palu tsunami. (2020-07-27)

COVID-19 lockdown caused 50% global reduction in human-linked Earth vibrations
The lack of human activity during lockdown caused human-linked vibrations in the Earth to drop by an average of 50% between March and May 2020. (2020-07-23)

What factors influence the likelihood of fracking-related seismicity in Oklahoma?
The depth of a hydraulic fracturing well in Oklahoma, among other factors, increases the probability that fracking will lead to earthquake activity, according to a new report in the Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America. (2020-07-21)

Using the past to predict the future: The case of Typhoon Hagibis
The past is often the window to our future, especially when it comes to natural disasters. Using data from the 2018 floods that struck southwestern Japan to calibrate a machine learning model, researchers from the International Research Institute of Disaster Science (IRIDeS) at Tohoku University and the Japan-Peru Center for Earthquake Engineering Research and Disaster Mitigation (CISMID, in Spanish), have successfully identified the flooding caused by Typhoon Hagibis. (2020-07-15)

New evidence of long-term volcanic, seismic risks in northern Europe
An ancient European volcanic region may pose both a greater long-term volcanic risk and seismic risk to northwestern Europe than scientists had realized, geophysicists report in a study in the Geophysical Journal International. The densely populated area is centered in the Eifel region of Germany, and covers parts of Belgium, the Netherlands, France and Luxembourg. (2020-07-09)

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