Current Earthquake News and Events | Page 2

Current Earthquake News and Events, Earthquake News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Viewed
Page 2 of 25 | 1000 Results
Supply constraint from earthquakes in Japan in input-output analysis
Supply constraint from earthquakes in Japan was examined in IOA. (2020-06-24)

22,000 tiny tremblors illustrate 3D fault geometry and earthquake swarm evolution
By mapping the more than 22,000 tremblors, researchers composed a detailed, three-dimensional image of the complex fault structure below southern California's Cahuilla Valley. (2020-06-18)

Natural fluid injections triggered Cahuilla earthquake swarm
Scientists generated a catalog of 22,000 seismic events from a four-year period to reveal the structure of an active fault zone. (2020-06-18)

Geoscientists create deeper look at processes below Earth's surface with 3D images
Geoscientists at The University of Texas at Dallas recently used massive amounts of earthquake data and supercomputers to generate high-resolution, 3D images of the dynamic geological processes taking place far below the Earth's surface. In a study published April 29 in Nature Communications, the research team described how it created images of mantle flows in a subduction region under Central America and the Caribbean Sea. (2020-06-17)

Past stressful experiences do not create resilience to future trauma, new study finds
Amid the COVID-19 pandemic, new research finds that past stressors and traumatic events increase vulnerability to mental illnesses, such as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and major depressive disorder (MDD). (2020-06-11)

Australia's ancient geology controls the pathways of modern earthquakes
New research near Uluru in Australia's arid centre shows that rock structures formed deep within the ancient Gondwana supercontinent controlled the rupture pathways of one of Australia's largest modern earthquakes. (2020-06-04)

New discovery could highlight areas where earthquakes are less likely to occur
Scientists from Cardiff University have discovered specific conditions that occur along the ocean floor where two tectonic plates are more likely to slowly creep past one another as opposed to drastically slipping and creating catastrophic earthquakes. (2020-06-02)

Designing a flexible material to protect buildings, military personnel
Now, a team of engineers led by Guoliang Huang, a James C. Dowell Professor in the Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Department at the University of Missouri College of Engineering, has designed a flexible material that can help buildings withstand multiple waves of energy traveling through a solid material, including the simultaneous forward and backward and side-to-side motions found in earthquakes. (2020-05-26)

FSU researcher detects unknown submarine landslides in Gulf of Mexico
A Florida State University researcher has used new detection methods to identify 85 previously unknown submarine landslides that occurred in the Gulf of Mexico between 2008 and 2015, leading to questions about the stability of oil rigs and other structures, such as pipelines built in the region. (2020-05-18)

Portland State researcher develops new model to accurately date historic earthquakes
Three earthquakes in the Monterey Bay Area, occurring in 1838, 1890 and 1906, happened without a doubt on the San Andreas Fault, according to a new paper by a Portland State University researcher. The paper, 'New Insights into Paleoseismic Age Models on the Northern San Andreas Fault: Charcoal In-built ages and Updated Earthquake Correlations,' was recently published in the Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America. (2020-05-14)

'Lettere patenti' help assess intensity of historic central Italian earthquakes
Three hundred-year-old administrative documents from the Roman government, granting residents permission to repair damage to their buildings, can help modern-day seismologists calculate intensities for a notable sequence of earthquakes that struck central Italy in 1703. (2020-05-13)

Fiber optics capture seismic signatures of the rose parade
Interesting signatures of the Rose Parade were captured by fiber optic telecommunications cable lying below the parade route. In Seismological Research Letters, Zhongwen Zhan of the California Institute of Technology and colleagues describe how they converted these dark or 'unused' fibers within cables into a dense seismic array. (2020-05-06)

Scientists observes changes in Earth's surface movement months before big earthquakes
Months prior to the earthquakes in Chile 2010 and Japan 2011, oscillations of the earth's surface occurred, in extensions of about 1,000 kilometers in each country, after which the decoupling of the tectonic plates was generated, causing both major earthquakes. (2020-05-06)

Model can predict hospital resilience for natural disasters, pandemics
CSU researchers have created a modeling tool that could help cities understand the full functionality and recovery of a healthcare system in the wake of a natural disaster. The model has wider implications for use in pandemics. (2020-04-29)

Does accelerated subduction precede great earthquakes?
A strange reversal of ground motion preceded two of the largest earthquakes in history. This is the result of a new study led by Jonathan Bedford of GFZ German Research Center for Geosciences. Together with international geoscientists he investigated signals recorded in Chile and Japan capturing the movement of GNSS stations before the great Maule quake in 2010 and the Tohoku-oki earthquake in 2011 which led to the tsunami and Fukushima nuclear meltdown. The scientists publish this in the latest issue of Nature. (2020-04-29)

'Wobble' may precede some great earthquakes, study shows
The land masses of Japan shifted from east to west to east again in the months before the strongest earthquake in the country's recorded history, a 2011 magnitude-9 earthquake that killed more than 15,500 people, new research shows. (2020-04-29)

Fracking and earthquake risk
Earthquakes caused by hydraulic fracturing can damage property and endanger lives. Stanford researchers have developed new guidelines for when to slow or halt fracking operations based on local risks. (2020-04-27)

New study finds connection between fault roughness and the magnitude of earthquakes
A new study led by McGill University has found that tectonic plates beneath the Earth's surface can show varying degrees of roughness and could help explain why certain earthquakes are stronger than others. (2020-04-24)

Seismic map of North America reveals geologic clues, earthquake hazards
A new stress map that reveals the forces acting on the planet's crust will contribute to safer energy exploration, updated seismic hazard maps and improved knowledge about the Earth. (2020-04-23)

Stanford study reveals a holistic way to measure the economic fallout from earthquakes
Officials know how to account for deaths, injuries and property damages after the shaking stops, but a study in Nature Sustainability, based on a hypothetical 7.2 magnitude quake near San Francisco, describes the first way to estimate the far greater financial fallout that such a disaster would have, especially on the poor. (2020-04-20)

Timing of large earthquakes follows a 'devil's staircase' pattern
At the regional level and worldwide, the occurrence of large shallow earthquakes appears to follow a mathematical pattern called the Devil's Staircase, where clusters of earthquake events are separated by long but irregular intervals of seismic quiet. (2020-04-14)

Social media can forecast economic impact of disasters including COVID-19 pandemic
Social media should be used to chart the economic impact and recovery of businesses in countries affected by the COVID-19 pandemic, according to new research published in Nature Communications. University of Bristol scientists describe a 'real time' method accurately trialled across three global natural disasters which could be used to reliably forecast the financial impact of the current global health crisis. (2020-04-08)

Making a connection: Two ways that fault segments may overcome their separation
In complex fault zones, multiple seemingly disconnected faults can potentially rupture at once, increasing the chance of a large damaging earthquake. Recent earthquakes including the 1992 Landers, 1999 Hector Mine and 2019 Ridgecrest earthquakes in California, among others, ruptured in this way. But how can seismologists predict whether individual fault segments might be connected and rupture together during a seismic event? (2020-04-07)

Study shows potential for using fiber-optic networks to assess ground motions during earthquakes
A new study from a University of Michigan researcher and colleagues at three institutions demonstrates the potential for using existing networks of buried optical fibers as an inexpensive observatory for monitoring and studying earthquakes. (2020-03-31)

Sediments may control location, magnitude of megaquakes
The world's most powerful earthquakes strike at subduction zones, areas where enormous amounts of stress build up as one tectonic plate dives beneath another. When suddenly released, this stress can cause devastating 'megaquakes' like the 2011 Mw 9.0 Tohoku event, which killed nearly 16,000 people and crippled Japan's Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant. (2020-03-31)

Disasters can affect cervical cancer screening for years
Screening is important for the early detection of cervical cancer, but rates were significantly affected, in some areas for years, following a devastating earthquake and tsunami in Japan. (2020-03-27)

Scientists get first look at cause of 'slow motion' earthquakes
An international team of scientists has for the first time identified the conditions deep below the Earth's surface that lead to the triggering of so-called 'slow motion' earthquakes. (2020-03-25)

Eclectic rocks influence earthquake types
New Zealand's largest fault is a jumble of mixed-up rocks of all shapes, sizes, compositions and origins. According to research from a global team of scientists, this motley mixture could help explain why the fault generates slow-motion earthquakes known as 'slow slip events' as well as destructive, tsunami-generating tremors. (2020-03-25)

Shifts in deep geologic structure may have magnified great 2011 Japan tsunami
Researchers say they have identified the origins of an unusual fault that probably magnified the catastrophic 2011 Japan tsunami. (2020-03-16)

Separations between earthquakes reveal clear patterns
So far, few studies have explored how the similarity between inter-earthquake times and distances is related to their separation from initial events. In a new study published in EPJ B, researchers at the Ocean University of China show for the first time that the two values become increasingly correlated the closer they are in time and space to previous, larger earthquakes. (2020-03-12)

'Fossil earthquakes' offer new insight into seismic activity deep below earth's surface
A study led by the University of Plymouth, published in Nature Communications, has shed new light on the mechanisms through which earthquakes are triggered up to 40km beneath the earth's surface (2020-03-12)

Researchers develop new explanation for destructive earthquake vibrations
High-frequency vibrations are some of the most damaging ground movements produced by earthquakes, and Brown University researchers have a new theory about how they're produced. (2020-03-03)

Sinking sea mountains make and muffle earthquakes
Subduction zones -- places where one tectonic plate dives beneath another -- are where the world's largest and most damaging earthquakes occur. A new study has found that when underwater mountains -- also known as seamounts -- are pulled into subduction zones, not only do they set the stage for these powerful quakes, but also create conditions that end up dampening them. (2020-03-02)

How earthquakes deform gravity
Researchers at the German Research Centre for Geosciences GFZ in Potsdam have developed an algorithm that for the first time can describe a gravitational signal caused by earthquakes with high accuracy. Tests with data from the 2011 earthquake near Fukushima show that the procedure could help to improve earthquake early warning systems in the future. (2020-02-21)

Earthquakes disrupt sperm whales' ability to find food, study finds
Otago scientists studying sperm whales off the coast of Kaik?ura have discovered earthquakes affect their ability to find food for at least a year. The University of Otago-led research is the first to examine the impact of a large earthquake on a population of marine mammals, and offers new insight into how top predators such as sperm whales react and adapt to a large-scale natural disturbance. (2020-02-19)

Early treatment for PTSD after a disaster has lasting effects
In 1988, a 6.9 magnitude earthquake struck near the northern Armenian city of Spitak. The temblor destroyed cities and is estimated to have killed between 25,000 and 35,000 people, many of whom were schoolchildren. The latest findings from a long-term, UCLA-led study reveal that children who survived the quake and received psychotherapy soon after have experienced health benefits into adulthood. (2020-02-14)

Deformation of Zealandia, Earth's Hidden continent, linked to forging of the Ring of Fire
Recent seafloor drilling has revealed that the 'hidden continent' of Zealandia -- a region of continental crust twice the size of India submerged beneath the southwest Pacific Ocean -- experienced dramatic elevation changes between about 50 million and 35 million years ago. (2020-02-06)

Pre-eruption seismograms recovered for 1980 Mount St. Helens event
Nearly 40 years ago, analog data tapes faithfully recorded intense seismic activity in the two months before the historic eruption of Mount St. Helens in Washington State in May 1980. It took some lengthy and careful restoration efforts--including a turn in a kitchen oven for some of the tapes--to recover their data. (2020-01-30)

Upper-plate earthquakes caused uplift along New Zealand's Northern Hikurangi Margin
Earthquakes along a complex series of faults in the upper plate of New Zealand's northern Hikurangi Subduction Margin were responsible for coastal uplift in the region, according to a new evaluation of local marine terraces. (2020-01-28)

Seismic biomarkers in Japan Trench fault zone reveal history of large earthquakes
Researchers used a novel technique to study the faults in the Japan Trench, the subduction zone where the magnitude 9.1 Tohoku-Oki earthquake struck in 2011. Their findings reveal a long history of large earthquakes in this fault zone, where they found multiple faults with evidence of more than 10 meters of slip during large earthquakes. (2020-01-27)

Page 2 of 25 | 1000 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.