Current Earthquakes News and Events | Page 2

Current Earthquakes News and Events, Earthquakes News Articles.
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Scientists develop principles for the creation of an "acoustic diode"
In research published in Science Advances, a group led by scientists from the RIKEN Center for Emergent Matter Science (CEMS) have used a principle, ''magneto-rotation coupling,'' to suppress the transmission of sound waves on the surface of a film in one direction while allowing them to travel in the other. (2020-08-07)

Citizen scientists help geologists to identify earthquakes and tectonic tremors
A new study shows that citizen scientists can help professionals in identifying seismic events. Citizens not only identified earthquakes, but collectively also mastered the difficult task of recognizing tremors, which previously could only be done by professional seismologists. Through the manual classification of seismic Big Data, citizens can help scientists to build catalogs and map seismic activity and become better at understanding earthquakes. (2020-08-06)

Researchers: What's in oilfield wastewater matters for injection-induced earthquakes
Specifically, he pointed out that oilfield brine has much different properties, like density and viscosity, than pure water, and these differences affect the processes that cause fluid pressure to trigger earthquakes. (2020-08-06)

One-size does not fit all for post-disaster recovery, PSU study finds
A new Portland State University study that followed 400 households after the 2015 Nepal earthquakes provides insight into better understanding the factors that contribute to resilience and change in short-term rural natural disaster recovery. (2020-07-30)

"Inchworm" pattern of Indonesian earthquake rupture powered seismic "boom"
A sonic boom-like seismic phenomenon of supershear rupture occurred during the 2018 Palu earthquake in Indonesia. University of Tsukuba researchers investigated the relationship between this phenomenon and the complex geometry of the Palu-Koro fault. An ''inchworm-like'' pattern of repeated rupture deceleration and acceleration along the fault was detected, associated with bends in the fault trace. This slip evolution may have enhanced the propagation of supershear rupture and contributed to the generation of the 2018 Palu tsunami. (2020-07-27)

Citizen science at heart of new study showing COVID-19 seismic noise reduction
Research published in the journal Science, using a mix of professional and Raspberry Shake citizen seismic data, finds that lockdown measures to slow the spread of the virus COVID-19 reduced seismic noise by 50% worldwide. (2020-07-24)

Seismic background noise drastically reduced due to COVID-19 lockdown measures
Global COVID-19 ''lockdown'' measures - the quarantines, physical isolation, travel restrictions and widespread closures of services and industry that countries around the world have implemented in 2020 - resulted in a months-long reduction in global seismic noise by up to 50%, representing the longest and most prominent global seismic noise reduction in recorded history. (2020-07-23)

COVID-19 lockdown caused 50% global reduction in human-linked Earth vibrations
The lack of human activity during lockdown caused human-linked vibrations in the Earth to drop by an average of 50% between March and May 2020. (2020-07-23)

What factors influence the likelihood of fracking-related seismicity in Oklahoma?
The depth of a hydraulic fracturing well in Oklahoma, among other factors, increases the probability that fracking will lead to earthquake activity, according to a new report in the Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America. (2020-07-21)

Geophysics: A first for a unique instrument
Geophysicists at Ludwig-Maximilians Universitaet (LMU) in Munich have measured Earth's spin and axis orientation with a novel ring laser, and provided the most precise determination of these parameters yet achieved by a ground-based instrument without the need for stellar range finding. (2020-07-20)

A new idea on how Earth's outer shell first broke into tectonic plates
Plate tectonics theory posits that Earth's outer shell is subdivided into plates that move relative to each other, concentrating most activity along the boundaries between plates, yet the scientific community has no firm concept on how plate tectonics got started. A new answer has been put forward by Dr. Alexander Webb at the University of Hong Kong, in collaboration with an international team in a paper published in Nature Communications. (2020-07-19)

The sixth sense of animals
Continuously observing animals with motion sensors could improve earthquake prediction. (2020-07-03)

Typhoon changed earthquake patterns
Intensive erosion can temporarily change the earthquake activity (seismicity) of a region significantly. This has now been shown for Taiwan by researchers from the GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences in cooperation with international colleagues. They report on this in the journal ''Scientific Reports''. (2020-07-02)

Cause of abnormal groundwater rise after large earthquake
Abnormal rises in groundwater levels after large earthquakes has been observed all over the world, but the cause has remained unknown due to a lack of comparative data before & after earthquakes. After the 2016 Kumamoto earthquakes, a collaboration of scientists from Japan and the US analyzed stable isotope ratios of water samples collected before and after the disaster. This allowed them to clarify the cause of the rise in water level. (2020-07-01)

Researchers catch a wave to determine how forces control granular material properties
Stress wave propagation through grainy, or granular, materials is important for detecting the magnitude of earthquakes, locating oil and gas reservoirs, designing acoustic insulation and designing materials for compacting powders. (2020-06-29)

New research reveals how water in the deep Earth triggers earthquakes and tsunamis
In a new study, published in the journal Nature, an international team of scientists provide the first conclusive evidence directly linking deep Earth's water cycle and its expressions with magmatic productivity and earthquake activity. (2020-06-24)

Supply constraint from earthquakes in Japan in input-output analysis
Supply constraint from earthquakes in Japan was examined in IOA. (2020-06-24)

How the giant sequoia protects itself
A three-dimensional network of fibers makes the bark resistant to fire and rock fall. (2020-06-17)

Geoscientists create deeper look at processes below Earth's surface with 3D images
Geoscientists at The University of Texas at Dallas recently used massive amounts of earthquake data and supercomputers to generate high-resolution, 3D images of the dynamic geological processes taking place far below the Earth's surface. In a study published April 29 in Nature Communications, the research team described how it created images of mantle flows in a subduction region under Central America and the Caribbean Sea. (2020-06-17)

Which factors control the height of mountains?
Which forces and mechanisms determine the height of mountains? A group of researchers from Münster and Potsdam has now found a surprising answer: It is not erosion and weathering of rocks that determine the upper limit of mountain massifs, but rather an equilibrium of forces in the Earth's crust. This finding, published in Nature, is fundamentally new and important for the earth sciences. (2020-06-11)

Australia's ancient geology controls the pathways of modern earthquakes
New research near Uluru in Australia's arid centre shows that rock structures formed deep within the ancient Gondwana supercontinent controlled the rupture pathways of one of Australia's largest modern earthquakes. (2020-06-04)

Study shows diamonds aren't forever
Two Tulane researchers were among a team of international experts who co-authored a paper that was published in the journal Nature on June 3. (2020-06-04)

New discovery could highlight areas where earthquakes are less likely to occur
Scientists from Cardiff University have discovered specific conditions that occur along the ocean floor where two tectonic plates are more likely to slowly creep past one another as opposed to drastically slipping and creating catastrophic earthquakes. (2020-06-02)

New clues to deep earthquake mystery
A new understanding of our planet's deepest earthquakes could help unravel one of the most mysterious geophysical processes on Earth. (2020-05-27)

FSU researcher detects unknown submarine landslides in Gulf of Mexico
A Florida State University researcher has used new detection methods to identify 85 previously unknown submarine landslides that occurred in the Gulf of Mexico between 2008 and 2015, leading to questions about the stability of oil rigs and other structures, such as pipelines built in the region. (2020-05-18)

Portland State researcher develops new model to accurately date historic earthquakes
Three earthquakes in the Monterey Bay Area, occurring in 1838, 1890 and 1906, happened without a doubt on the San Andreas Fault, according to a new paper by a Portland State University researcher. The paper, 'New Insights into Paleoseismic Age Models on the Northern San Andreas Fault: Charcoal In-built ages and Updated Earthquake Correlations,' was recently published in the Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America. (2020-05-14)

'Lettere patenti' help assess intensity of historic central Italian earthquakes
Three hundred-year-old administrative documents from the Roman government, granting residents permission to repair damage to their buildings, can help modern-day seismologists calculate intensities for a notable sequence of earthquakes that struck central Italy in 1703. (2020-05-13)

Growing mountains or shifting ground: What is going on in Earth's inner core?
Exhaustive seismic data from repeating earthquakes and new data-processing methods have yielded the best evidence yet that the Earth's inner core is rotating - revealing a better understanding of the hotly debated processes that control the planet's magnetic field. (2020-05-12)

Scientists observes changes in Earth's surface movement months before big earthquakes
Months prior to the earthquakes in Chile 2010 and Japan 2011, oscillations of the earth's surface occurred, in extensions of about 1,000 kilometers in each country, after which the decoupling of the tectonic plates was generated, causing both major earthquakes. (2020-05-06)

Does accelerated subduction precede great earthquakes?
A strange reversal of ground motion preceded two of the largest earthquakes in history. This is the result of a new study led by Jonathan Bedford of GFZ German Research Center for Geosciences. Together with international geoscientists he investigated signals recorded in Chile and Japan capturing the movement of GNSS stations before the great Maule quake in 2010 and the Tohoku-oki earthquake in 2011 which led to the tsunami and Fukushima nuclear meltdown. The scientists publish this in the latest issue of Nature. (2020-04-29)

'Wobble' may precede some great earthquakes, study shows
The land masses of Japan shifted from east to west to east again in the months before the strongest earthquake in the country's recorded history, a 2011 magnitude-9 earthquake that killed more than 15,500 people, new research shows. (2020-04-29)

Fracking and earthquake risk
Earthquakes caused by hydraulic fracturing can damage property and endanger lives. Stanford researchers have developed new guidelines for when to slow or halt fracking operations based on local risks. (2020-04-27)

New study finds connection between fault roughness and the magnitude of earthquakes
A new study led by McGill University has found that tectonic plates beneath the Earth's surface can show varying degrees of roughness and could help explain why certain earthquakes are stronger than others. (2020-04-24)

Seismic map of North America reveals geologic clues, earthquake hazards
A new stress map that reveals the forces acting on the planet's crust will contribute to safer energy exploration, updated seismic hazard maps and improved knowledge about the Earth. (2020-04-23)

Excessive rain triggered 2018 Kīlauea volcano eruption, study finds
Excessive and sustained rainfall triggered the 2018 eruption of Kīlauea volcano in Hawaii, according to researchers at the University of Miami (UM) Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science. The researchers suggest that local rainfall patterns may contribute significantly to the timing and frequency of the eruption at Kilauea and perhaps at other volcanoes. (2020-04-22)

Study suggests rainfall triggered 2018 Kīlauea eruption
In May 2018 Kīlauea volcano on the island of Hawaii erupted, touching off months of intense activity. Through August, incandescent lava from fissures spewed hundreds of feet in the air, and billowing ash clouds reached as high as six million. (2020-04-22)

Evidence for plate tectonics on earth prior to 3.2 billion years ago
New research indicates that plate tectonics may have been well underway on Earth more than 3.2 billion years ago, adding a new dimension to an ongoing debate about exactly when plate tectonics began influencing the early evolution of the planet. An analysis of lingering magnetism in rocks from the nearly 3.2 billion year-old Honeyeater Basalt of the East Pilbara. (2020-04-22)

Timing of large earthquakes follows a 'devil's staircase' pattern
At the regional level and worldwide, the occurrence of large shallow earthquakes appears to follow a mathematical pattern called the Devil's Staircase, where clusters of earthquake events are separated by long but irregular intervals of seismic quiet. (2020-04-14)

Making a connection: Two ways that fault segments may overcome their separation
In complex fault zones, multiple seemingly disconnected faults can potentially rupture at once, increasing the chance of a large damaging earthquake. Recent earthquakes including the 1992 Landers, 1999 Hector Mine and 2019 Ridgecrest earthquakes in California, among others, ruptured in this way. But how can seismologists predict whether individual fault segments might be connected and rupture together during a seismic event? (2020-04-07)

Study shows potential for using fiber-optic networks to assess ground motions during earthquakes
A new study from a University of Michigan researcher and colleagues at three institutions demonstrates the potential for using existing networks of buried optical fibers as an inexpensive observatory for monitoring and studying earthquakes. (2020-03-31)

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