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Current Eating News and Events, Eating News Articles.
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People with type 2 diabetes need not avoid eating potatoes based on glycemic index
People with type 2 Diabetes (T2D) are frequently told to avoid eating potatoes, and other high Glycemic Index (GI) foods, because of the longstanding perception that these foods make it difficult to control blood sugar levels. (2020-10-26)
DNA in fringe-lipped bat poop reveals unexpected eating habits
By examining the poop of the fringe-lipped bat (Trachops cirrhosus), a team at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute (STRI) encountered surprising results about its eating habits and foraging abilities. (2020-10-22)
COVID-19 anxiety linked to body image issues
A new study has found that anxiety and stress directly linked to COVID-19 could be causing a number of body image issues. (2020-10-22)
Study links eating disorders with body dysmorphia
People with eating disorders are 12 times more likely to be preoccupied with perceived flaws in their physical appearance than those without, according to new research published in the journal Eating and Weight Disorders. (2020-10-13)
USC study underscores the gut-brain connection, shows hunger hormone impacts memory
Rats that lacked the hormone ghrelin tended to eat more frequently and gained more weight. (2020-10-12)
Perforated bone tissue from too little sugar
Bone marrow cancer is currently an incurable disease that affects about 400 people in Norway every year. (2020-10-09)
Dietary migration of Impala rivals the geographical migration of Serengeti wildebeest
Study shows the Impala's migration is a 'dietary migration', where they switch from eating mostly grass in the wet season, to eating more tree leaves or 'browse' during the dry season. (2020-10-08)
Body size of the extinct Megalodon indeed off the charts in the shark world
A new study shows that the body size of the iconic gigantic or megatooth shark, about 15 meters (50 feet) in length, is indeed anomalously large compared to body sizes of its relatives. (2020-10-05)
Inflammatory gene provides clue to obesity risk
A gene that helps to control inflammation increases the risk of obesity and could be turned off in mice to stop weight gain, a study from The University of Queensland has found. (2020-09-29)
Cooked carrots can trigger allergic reactions
The consumption of raw carrots triggers allergic reactions in many people. (2020-09-24)
Jellyfish with your chips?
Jellyfish could replace fish and chips on a new sustainable takeaway menu to help keep threatened species off the plate. (2020-09-21)
Time-restricted feeding improves health without altering the body's core clock
For the first time, scientists have studied the early effects of time-restricted feeding on the daily periodic oscillations of metabolites and genes in muscle, and metabolites in blood. (2020-09-17)
Devi mangiare! Why culture may be contributing to disordered eating among women
'You have to eat!' It's a sentiment that illustrates how central food is to Italian culture, but the woman who uttered these words also happens to be struggling with bulimia nervosa. (2020-09-16)
When methane-eating microbes eat ammonia instead
As a side effect of their metabolism, microorganisms living on methane can also convert ammonia. (2020-09-13)
Weight stigma predicts emotional distress and binge eating during COVID-19
New research from the UConn Rudd Center for Food Policy and Obesity and the University of Minnesota shows that young adults who experienced weight stigma before the pandemic have higher levels of depressive symptoms, stress, eating as a coping strategy, and are more likely to binge-eat during COVID-19 compared to those who haven't experienced weight stigma. (2020-09-10)
More than half of people struggled to manage their weight during COVID-19 lockdown, suggests UK survey
More than half of adults have found it difficult to manage their weight during the COVID-19 lockdown, according to the results of an online survey involving over 800 UK adults, being presented at The European and International Congress on Obesity (ECOICO), held online this year (1-4 September). (2020-09-01)
College students access eating disorders therapy via phone app
Studying college women with eating disorders, a team led by researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. (2020-08-31)
Fungi in gut linked to higher Alzheimer's risk can be reduced through ketogenic diet
Specific fungi in the gut associated with a higher risk of Alzheimer's disease and found in people with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) can be altered in a beneficial manner by eating a modified Mediterranean diet, researchers at Wake Forest School of Medicine have found. (2020-08-31)
Evening eating is associated with higher total calorie intake and lower diet quality
A study of nearly 1200 UK adults, being presented at this year's European and International Conference on Obesity (ECOICO 2020), held online this year (Sept. (2020-08-31)
Mineral dust ingested with food leaves characteristic wear on herbivore teeth
In a controlled feeding study of guinea pigs, paleontologists have discovered that mineral dust ingested with food causes distinct signs of wear on the teeth of plant-eating vertebrates, which can differ considerably depending on the type of dust. (2020-08-25)
Research reveals toll of pandemic on those with eating disorders
The COVID-19 pandemic is having a profound, negative impact on nine out of ten people with experience of eating disorders, a new study from Northumbria University, Newcastle, reveals. (2020-08-23)
Can a healthy diet reduce risk of Parkinson's?
While movement problems are the main symptoms of Parkinson's disease, people with the disease often have non-motor symptoms such as constipation, daytime sleepiness and depression 10 or more years before the movement problems start. (2020-08-19)
Scientists sound the alarm: Lockdowns may escalate the obesity epidemic
Emotional stress, economic anxiety, physical inactivity and social distance - locking down society to combat COVID-19 creates psychosocial insecurity that leads to obesity, warn three Danish researchers. (2020-08-13)
TV-watching snackers beware: you won't notice you're full if your attention is elsewhere
Eating while doing something perceptually-demanding makes it more difficult to notice when you feel full, shows new research from the University of Sussex. (2020-08-12)
Biology blurs line between sexes, behaviors
Biological sex is typically understood in binary terms: male and female. (2020-08-10)
REM sleep tunes eating behavior
REM sleep tunes eating behavior. (2020-08-06)
Rethink needed for treatment of Severe and Enduring Anorexia Nervosa
Concerns over ineffective traditional treatments have prompted calls to better understand the complex processes underpinning Severe and Enduring Anorexia Nervosa (SE-AN). (2020-08-05)
Increased global mortality linked to arsenic exposure in rice-based diets
Rice is the most widely consumed staple food source for a large part of the world's population. (2020-08-04)
Food menu fit for pandemic times
In the midst of the global COVID-19 pandemic, eating well in a sustainable way is more important now than ever, Flinders University experts say. (2020-08-03)
Hedonism leads to happiness
Relaxing on the sofa or savoring a delicious meal: Enjoying short-term pleasurable activities that don't lead to long-term goals contributes at least as much to a happy life as self-control, according to new research from the University of Zurich and Radboud University in the Netherlands. (2020-07-27)
Pizza study shows body copes surprisingly well with one-off calorie indulgence
Young men can eat twice as much food as they need to feel 'full', research shows. (2020-07-24)
Chocolate is good for the heart
Eating chocolate at least once a week is linked with a reduced risk of heart disease, according to research published today in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, a journal of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC).1 ''Our study suggests that chocolate helps keep the heart's blood vessels healthy,'' said study author Dr. (2020-07-22)
Crown-of-thorns enhance their growth by switching diets early
When juvenile crown-of-thorns starfish switch their diets from coralline algae to corals early after settlement, they exhibit enhanced growth rates for longer and will ultimately get much bigger. (2020-07-21)
Mismatched caregiver-infant interactions during feeding could boost babies' risk of later obesity
A new integrative review examined evidence related to infants' self-regulation of behavior and emotion, and how that relates to interactions when they are fed by their caregivers, including how those interactions may derail infants' ability to regulate their intake of food. (2020-07-14)
Study links stress hormone with higher blood sugar in Type 2 diabetes
A new study by researchers at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center and The Ohio State University College of Medicine documents a clear link between the stress hormone cortisol and higher blood sugar levels in people with type 2 diabetes. (2020-07-13)
An early morning whey protein snack increases morning blood sugar level in healthy people
Consuming protein at night increases blood sugar level in the morning for healthy people, according to new research presented this week at The Physiological Society's virtual early career conference called Future Physiology 2020. (2020-07-10)
Born to be a cannibal: Genes for feeding behavior in mandarin fish identified
Some mandarin fish species (Sinipercidae) are pure fish-eaters, which feed exclusively on living juvenile fish - also of their own species. (2020-07-09)
Jellyfish contain no calories, so why do they still attract predators?
New study shows that jellyfish are an important food source for many animals. (2020-06-24)
Adding lean beef to a healthy diet does not adversely affect heart health or diabetes risk
Results from a new study show that risk factors for cardiovascular disease and diabetes were similar when participants consumed a healthy US-style eating pattern with and without an additional 5.3 ounces of lean beef. (2020-06-16)
Simulated sea slug gets addicted to drug
Scientists built a computer model of a simple brain network based on that of a sea slug, taught it how to get food, gave it an appetite and the ability to experience reward, added a dash of something called homeostatic plasticity and then exposed it to a very intoxicating drug. (2020-06-16)
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