Current Ebola News and Events

Current Ebola News and Events, Ebola News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Viewed
Page 1 of 23 | 884 Results
Coronavirus test from a suitcase
A portable suitcase could aid quick diagnosis of SARS-CoV-2 cases in Africa. In cooperation with several African universities, scientists at Leipzig University have found that a mini-laboratory provides test results that are almost as good as a PCR test - and almost in real time. The researchers have now published their findings in the journal 'Analytical Chemistry'. (2021-02-11)

Ebola is a master of disguise
Ebola is so pernicious because it pulls a fast one on the body, disguising itself as a dying cell. A study published in the journal PLOS Pathogens, identifies a pathway that all filoviruses use to gain entry into our cells--and shows how they can be stopped in their tracks by at least one FDA-approved drug. (2021-02-11)

New drug target for Ebola, Marburg viruses
Researchers have identified a previously unknown site on the filovirus glycoprotein to which small drug molecules can bind and prevent infection -- blocking both sites may be a more effective treatment while reducing the risk of side effects. (2021-02-08)

Antibody highs and lows in survivors of Ebola
A high proportion of survivors of Ebola experienced a resurgence in antibody levels nearly a year after recovery, a new University of Liverpool study has found. Published today in Nature, the finding hints that hidden reservoirs of virus could exist long after symptoms ease and has implications for monitoring programmes and vaccine strategies. (2021-01-27)

Targeting the deadly coils of Ebola
Computer simulations of the Ebola virus structure are helping to crack its defenses. Ebola virus nucleocapsid stability conferred by RNA electrostatic interactions. XSEDE EMPOWER undergraduate program, allocations on TACC Stampede2 and PSC Bridges systems supported research. Research by Perilla Lab of the University of Delaware opens door for possible druggable sites targeting stability of Ebola virus nucleocapsid. (2020-12-21)

Improved macaque genome enhances biomedical utility
Using advanced sequencing technology, researchers present a new, improved and far more complete reference genome for the rhesus macaque - one of the most important animal models in biomedical research. (2020-12-17)

HKU research team invents novel light-controlled contamination-free fluidic processor
A mechanical engineering research team at the University of Hong Kong has invented a novel light-controlled, contamination-free fluidic processor, which can serve as a useful tool to greatly reduce the risk of infection of front-line medical workers in testing virus or bacteria in big pandemics like the current COVID-19 pandemic, and to minimise the risk of contamination during the process. The new technology has been published in Science Advances in an article titled 'Photopyroelectric Microfluidics'. (2020-12-08)

Oxford University podcast returns with season on the History of Pandemics
The University of Oxford's CASE Gold Award winning podcast, Futuremakers, will return for its third season at the end of October. (2020-11-27)

Grabbing viruses out of thin air
Materials that convert mechanical into electrical or magnetic energy could open the door to a future of wearable and structure-integrated virus sensors. (2020-11-25)

A cost-effective program to fight COVID-19 in resource-challenged countries
A public health strategy that combines contact tracing and community-based screening with isolation and quarantine centers can substantially reduce infections, hospitalizations and deaths from COVID-19 while being cost-effective in low-and-middle-income countries like South Africa, a study by Massachusetts General Hospital has found. (2020-11-13)

Researchers identify promising new compounds to potentially treat novel coronaviruses
Researchers at the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM) have discovered new drug compounds to potentially treat the novel coronavirus that causes COVID-19. This finding could lead to the development of new broad-spectrum antiviral drugs that target viruses such as influenza, Ebola and coronaviruses. (2020-11-13)

Scientists find Ebola virus antibodies in people before 2018 DRC outbreak
Scientists found antibodies to Ebola virus in people up to a year before the 2018 Ebola virus disease outbreak began in the Eastern Democratic Republic of Congo, or DRC. This suggests that either early cases may have been missed or that exposure occurs more commonly than previously thought, according to a study led by the University of California, Davis. (2020-11-04)

Duke-NUS study uncovers why bats excel as viral reservoirs without getting sick
Study confirms bats adopt multiple strategies to reduce pro-inflammatory responses, thus mitigating potential immune-mediated tissue damage and disease. Findings provide important insights for medical research on human diseases. (2020-10-26)

Computational study reveals how Ebola nucleocapsid stabilizes
Scientists at the University of Delaware report a computational study of the Ebola virus nucleocapsid and show that the binding of the ssRNA allows the nucleocapsid to maintain its shape and structural integrity. (2020-10-20)

Targeting the shell of the Ebola virus
As the world grapples with COVID-19, the Ebola virus is again raging. A research team at University of Delaware is using supercomputers to simulate the inner workings of Ebola (as well as COVID-19), looking at how molecules move, atom by atom, to carry out their functions. Now, they have revealed structural features of the Ebola virus's protein shell to provide therapeutic targets to destabilize the virus and knock it out with an antiviral treatment. (2020-10-20)

Molecular mechanism of cross-species transmission of primate lentiviruses
A research group at The Institute of Medical Science, The University of Tokyo (IMSUT) showed that gorilla APOBEC3G potentially plays a role in inhibiting SIVcpz replication. Intriguingly, the research group demonstrated that an amino acid substitution in SIVcpz Vif, M16E, is sufficient to overcome gorilla APOBEC3G-mediated restriction. (2020-10-07)

Distribution range of Ebola virus carriers in Africa may be larger than previously assumed
Zaire ebolavirus is among the deadliest of all known Ebola viruses for humans and is most likely transmitted by various species of bats. Models recently developed by scientists of the Senckenberg Nature Research Society and the Goethe University in Frankfurt show where these species may thrive in Africa. The results of the study, published in the journal ''Scientific Reports'', suggest a wider range of distribution for the bat and fruit bat species than previously assumed. (2020-09-07)

Discovered: Cellular pathway involved in resistance to Ebola virus and SARS-like coronaviruses
Researchers working in human cells have identified a new pathway that targets a common vulnerability in several different pandemic viruses. (2020-08-27)

MHC class II transactivator CIITA induces cell resistance to Ebola Virus and SARS-like coronaviruses
Discoveries from the Benaroya Research Institute at Virginia Mason (BRI) have identified a new cellular protection pathway that targets a common vulnerability in several different pandemic viruses, and collaborators at Case Western Reserve University, Boston University School of Medicine and MRIGlobal have shown that this pathway can protect cells from infection by Ebola virus and coronaviruses, like SARS-CoV-2. Published today in Science, these new findings provide a better understanding of cellular mechanisms involved in viral resistance that can inform future treatments and therapies for viral infectious diseases. (2020-08-27)

Why doesn't Ebola cause disease in bats, as it does in people?
A new study by researchers from The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston uncovered new information on why the Ebola virus can live within bats without causing them harm, while the same virus wreaks deadly havoc to people. (2020-08-18)

Experimental COVID-19 vaccine prevents severe disease in mice
Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have created a COVID-19 vaccine candidate from a replicating virus. This experimental vaccine has proven effective at preventing pneumonia in mice. (2020-08-11)

Managing personal protective equipment in health care settings
An article in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal) provides an overview on personal protective equipment (PPE) in health care settings, including evidence on effectiveness of N95 masks, as well as the importance of including health care worker perspectives on usage of this equipment. http://www.cmaj.ca/lookup/doi/10.1503/cmaj.200575 (2020-06-25)

Virtually screening antiviral compounds against SARS-CoV-2 structure may speed up drug and vaccine D
Virtually screening antiviral compounds to model their interactions with the SARS-CoV-2 virus may enable scientists to more easily identify antiviral drugs that work against the virus while informing the search for viable vaccine candidates, according to a new study. By screening for interactions with certain (2020-06-24)

Environmental conditions found to affect stability of virus that causes COVID-19
A new study led by Marshall University researcher M. Jeremiah Matson found that environmental conditions affect the stability of the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) in human nasal mucus and sputum. (2020-06-19)

New research shows tiny, decoy 'sponges' attract coronavirus away from lung cells
New nanotechnology tested at BU's NEIDL stops SARS-CoV-2 from infecting cells and replicating. (2020-06-18)

Ebola transmission risks would be taken more seriously with ground-up interventions
A study led by the University of Kent's Durrell Institute of Conservation and Ecology (DICE) has found significant differences in disease risk perception and channels of information about Ebola virus disease (EVD) in rural areas and urban centres of Guinea, West Africa. (2020-06-10)

When developing vaccines against COVID-19, 'fast is slow, and slow is fast'
Bypassing clinical trials for a potential SARS-CoV-2 vaccine would be ''catastrophic,'' says Science Advances deputy editor Douglas Green in this Editorial. Instead, it's vital to take time to ensure any vaccine candidate's safety and investigate potential adverse (2020-05-22)

Learning about reporting in a public health emergency from Sierra Leone's Ebola outbreak
In a paper publishing May 21 in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases, researchers have interviewed Sierra Leonean journalists about their experiences reporting during the 2014-2015 Ebola outbreak. The experiences of these journalists may be able to help inform current efforts to communicate about COVID-19. (2020-05-21)

US inroads to better Ebola vaccine
As the world focuses on finding a COVID-19 vaccine, research continues on other potentially catastrophic pandemic diseases, including Ebola and Marburg viruses. In the latest collaboration with US partners, a vaccine turbocharger called Advax™ adjuvant, was combined with a synthetic protein against Ebola developed by the United States Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Disease (USAMRIID). (2020-05-18)

Economists: Lack of COVID-19 preparedness in line with previous findings
The threat of a catastrophic pandemic in 2014 -- the West African Ebola outbreak -- did little to change the perception of US citizens regarding the importance of preparing for future outbreaks, (2020-05-14)

Telehealth tools developed for Ebola improve COVID-19 care
The telemedicine tools are allowing doctors to provide personal, high-quality care while conserving vital personal protective equipment and reducing infection risks. (2020-05-11)

Repurposing existing drugs for COVID-19 offers a more rapid alternative to a vaccine
Repurposing existing medicines focused on known drug targets is likely to offer a more rapid hope of tackling COVID-19 than developing and manufacturing a vaccine, argue an international team of scientists in the British Journal of Pharmacology today. (2020-05-07)

Blueprint to protect the mental health of frontline medical workers
University of Queensland researchers have developed a set of recommendations to manage the mental health of frontline medical workers during viral outbreaks, such as COVID-19. (2020-05-05)

MU researcher identifies four possible treatments for COVID-19
While COVID-19 has infected millions of people worldwide and killed hundreds of thousands, there is currently no vaccine. In response, researchers have been evaluating the effectiveness of various antiviral drugs as possible COVID-19 treatments. (2020-05-04)

Researchers uncover mechanisms of protective antibody response during Marburg infection
A detailed study of the monoclonal antibodies from a person who survived a Marburg infection led researchers to identify novel mechanisms that contribute protection against the disease, according to the latest findings of a collaborative team led by The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston and Vanderbilt University Medical Center. The findings are now available in Cell Host & Microbe. (2020-04-21)

RIT researchers build micro-device to detect bacteria, viruses
Ke Du and Blanca Lapizco-Encinas, both faculty-researchers in RIT's Kate Gleason College of Engineering, worked with an international team to collaborate on the design of a next-generation miniature lab device that uses magnetic nano-beads to isolate minute bacterial particles that cause diseases. This new technology improves how clinicians isolate drug-resistant strains of bacterial infections and difficult-to-detect micro-particles such as those making up Ebola and coronaviruses. (2020-04-17)

New universal Ebola vaccine may fight all four virus species that infect humans
Infectious disease scientists report early development of a potential universal vaccine for Ebola viruses that preclinical tests show might neutralize all four species of these deadly viruses infecting people in recent outbreaks, mainly in Africa. Although still in early preclinical testing, researchers report in the Journal of Virology that their data indicate that the prospective vaccine has potential to be a stand-alone protection from Ebola. (2020-04-16)

Study finds remdesivir effective against a key enzyme of coronavirus that causes COVID-19
Scientists at the University of Alberta have shown that the drug remdesivir is highly effective in stopping the replication mechanism of the coronavirus that causes COVID-19, according to new research published in the Journal of Biological Chemistry. The paper follows closely on research published by the same lab in late February that demonstrated how the drug worked against the Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) virus, a related coronavirus. (2020-04-13)

Putting remdesivir to the test for COVID-19
As the coronavirus pandemic claims lives and overwhelms health care systems throughout the world, scientists are closely watching several late-stage trials of the antiviral drug remdesivir. Developed to treat Ebola, remdesivir is now being tested against COVID-19. However, many infectious disease experts caution that the trials are unlikely to yield clear-cut results, according to an article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society. (2020-04-08)

New algorithm aims to protect surgical team members against infection with COVID-19 virus
Researchers have created an algorithm that aims to protect operating room team members who perform urgent and emergency operations from COVID-19. (2020-04-06)

Page 1 of 23 | 884 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.