Current Ecology News and Events

Current Ecology News and Events, Ecology News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Viewed
Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
Saving your data together helps birds and bird research
It hasn't been more than a year and a half since the international researchers' network SPI-Birds started officially. Together they collect, secure and use long-term breeding population data of 1.5 million individually recognisable birds... and counting. Big questions in ecology and evolution can be answered using this data. Today, the publication of SPI-Birds' first scientific paper in the Journal of Animal Ecology coincides with receiving the Dutch Data Incentive Prize for Medical and Life Sciences. (2020-11-18)

Study highlights sex-specific variability in mouse features
Scientists have shown that sex-specific differences in variability depend on individual physical and physiological features in mice, debunking competing theories that either males or females are more variable. (2020-11-17)

Slow-living animal species could be disease 'reservoirs'
Animals that live slowly - breeding less rapidly and living longer - could be ''reservoirs'' of diseases that could jump to new species including humans, new research suggests. (2020-11-09)

Workshop collaboration aims to move tidal marsh research forward
Tidal marshes play a significant role in coastal ecosystems. They are a nursery ground for juvenile fishes and a line of defense in coastal erosion. However, there is still a great deal not known about tidal marshes. In November 2019, 65 scientists, managers, and restoration practitioners converged at the Dauphin Island Sea Lab to see where tidal marsh research has been and where it needs to go. (2020-11-09)

Species more likely to die out with rapid climate changes
The great tit and other birds can adapt to changes in their food supply as a result of climate change, but they run into trouble if the changes happen too quickly. (2020-11-05)

Intensive lab experiences and online learning during the COVID-19 pandemic
For students studying ecology and evolution, it's important to experience the processes and concepts they are learning about nature in nature. As a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, however, field-based courses rapidly transitioned to online only delivery. An article published in Ecology and Evolution discusses the potential advantages of pairing an intensive lab experience with an otherwise online delivery. (2020-11-04)

Paper addresses fieldwork safety for minority scientists
Scientists and graduate students with minority identities who conduct fieldwork report being stalked, followed, sexually assaulted, harassed, threatened, having guns pulled on them and police called on them. These issues threaten minority-identity researchers' physical health and safety during fieldwork, while also affecting their mental health, productivity and professional development. (2020-11-04)

From nitrate crisis to phosphate crisis?
The aim of the EU Nitrates Directive is to reduce nitrates leaking into the environment and to prevent pollution of water supplies. The widely accepted view is that this will help protect threatened plant species which can be damaged by high levels of nutrients like nitrates. However, an international team including the Universities of Göttingen, Utrecht and Zurich, has discovered that many threatened plant species will suffer because of this policy. Results appeared in Nature Ecology and Evolution. (2020-11-03)

What's for dinner? Dolphin diet study
More evidence has emerged to support stricter coastal management, this time focusing on pollution and overfishing in the picturesque tourist waters off Auckland in New Zealand. A study of common dolphins (Delphinus delphis) in the Hauraki Gulf connects their diet with the prevalence of commercial fishing and water quality - emphasising the need to carefully manage marine parks and surrounding environments to prevent overfishing and extensive nutrient runoff. (2020-11-02)

Small mussels in the Baltic are getting even smaller
Blue mussels in the Baltic Sea are getting smaller with time but bigger in numbers, according to a new study from Stockholm University. Analyzing data from the last 24 years, the main reason for this appears to be changes in food quality. The type of phytoplankton that is available for blue mussels to eat can in turn be linked to our changing climate. (2020-10-27)

Drug resistance linked to antibiotic use and patient transfers in hospitals
Understanding the role of antibiotic use patterns and patient transfers in the emergence of drug-resistant microbes is essential to crafting effective prevention strategies, suggests a study published today in eLife. (2020-10-27)

Tiny beetles a bellwether of ecological disruption by climate change
New research shows that as species across the world adjust where they live in response to climate change, they will come into competition with other species that could hamper their ability to keep up with the pace of this change. (2020-10-19)

More than 'just a fish' story
For recreational fishing enthusiasts, the thrill of snagging their next catch comes with discovering what's hooked on the end of the line. In many freshwater streams and rivers -- across the central and eastern parts of the U.S. -- anglers are often catching a popular freshwater game fish: the smallmouth bass. Now, scientists have discovered a new level of biodiversity within that species. (2020-10-19)

Crabs are key to ecology and economy in Oman
The intertidal mudflats of Barr Al Hikman, a nature reserve at the south-east coast of the Sultanate Oman, are crucial nursery grounds for numerous crab species. In return, crabs are a vital element of the ecology, as well as the regional economy, a new publication in Hydrobiologia shows. 'These important functions of the crabs should be considered when looking at the increasing human pressure on this nature reserve', first author and NIOZ-researcher Roeland Bom says. (2020-10-08)

Sicker livestock may increase climate woes
Climate change is affecting the spread and severity of infectious diseases around the world -- and infectious diseases may in turn be contributing to climate change, according to a new paper in Trends in Ecology & Evolution. The research, led by Vanessa Ezenwa, a professor of ecology at the University of Georgia, and funded by the Living Earth Collaborative at Washington University in St. Louis, describes how parasites can cause animals to produce more methane, a powerful greenhouse gas. (2020-10-07)

Naked prehistoric monsters! Evidence that prehistoric flying reptiles probably had
Pterosaur expert Dr David Unwin from the University of Leicester's Centre for Palaeobiology Research, and Professor Dave Martill, of the University of Portsmouth have examined the evidence that these creatures had feathers and believe they were in fact bald (2020-09-28)

Penicillium camemberti: a history of domestication on cheese
The white, fluffy layer that covers Camembert is made of a mould resulting from human selection, similar to the way dogs were domesticated from wolves. A collaboration involving French scientists from the CNRS has shown that the mould Penicillium camemberti is the result of a domestication process. (2020-09-24)

Tiny worlds reveal fundamental drivers of abundance, diversity
Ecology is traditionally a data-poor discipline, but tiny microbial worlds offer the quantity of data needed to solve universal questions about abundance and diversity. New research in Nature Communications reveals the fundamental relationship between the environment and the species present in a microbial community and can be used as a starting point for investigating bigger systems. (2020-09-23)

Ecological factors driving microbial community assembly in response to warming
Researchers from the OU Institute for Environmental Genomics and Department of Microbiology and Plant Biology lead a study that aims to better understand ecological community assembly mechanisms in response to climate warming. (2020-09-22)

Herd immunity an impractical strategy, study finds
Achieving herd immunity to COVID-19 is an impractical public health strategy, according to a new model developed by University of Georgia scientists. The study recently appeared in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. (2020-09-22)

Ecologists sound alarm on plastic pollution
Research led by ecologists at the University of Toronto examining plastic pollution entering oceans, rivers and lakes around the world annually, outlines potential impacts of various mitigation strategies over the coming decade. The researchers estimate the scale of human response needed to reduce future emissions and manage what's already floating around out there and recommend a fundamental shift to a framework based on recycling where end-of-life plastic products are valued rather than becoming waste. (2020-09-17)

Rising temperatures could shift US West Nile virus transmission
West Nile virus spreads most efficiently in the US at temperatures between 24-25 degrees Celsius (75.2-77 degrees Fahrenheit), a new study published today in eLife shows. (2020-09-15)

Shedding light on coral reefs
New research published in the journal Coral Reefs generates the largest characterization of coral reef spectral data to date. These data are an initial step in building a quantitative understanding of reef water clarity. With these data, coral reef scientists can begin to develop models to address fundamental questions about how reefs function, such as how much light reaches the various reef zones or how ecological zonation on reefs might be driven by light absorption. (2020-09-11)

How chemical diversity in plants facilitates plant-animal interactions
As we continue to lose global biodiversity, we are also losing chemical diversity and the chance for discovery,''said Lauren Maynard, a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of Biological Sciences within the College of Science. (2020-09-10)

Scientists discover earliest fossil evidence of an insect lichen mimic
Scientists have uncovered the earliest known evidence of an insect mimicking a lichen as a survival strategy, according to new findings published today in eLife. (2020-09-01)

Dodder uses the flowering signal of its host plant to flower
Researchers from the Chinese Academy of Sciences and the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology have investigated how the parasitic dodder Cuscuta australis controls flower formation. They showed that the parasite eavesdrops on the flowering signals of its host plants in order to activate its own flowering machinery. By synchronizing flowering with its host plant, the parasite makes sure that it can grow on its host long enough to produce the optimal amount of seeds. (2020-08-31)

What kind of animal transports the seeds of the world's smallest fruit-bearing plants?
Plants in the Balanophora genus have very small fruits and very little is known about their seed dispersal strategy. Associate Professor Suetsugu Kenji (Kobe University Graduate School of Science) illuminates a previously unrecognized seed dispersal mutualism between Balanophora yakushimensis and birds, which are attracted by and obtain nutrients from its fleshy bracts. (2020-08-21)

Out of sync: Ecologists report climate change affecting bee, plant life cycles
Reporting on the first community-wide assessment of 67 bee species of the Colorado Rockies, ecologists Michael Stemkovski of Utah State University and Rebecca Irwin of North Carolina State University say ''phenological mismatch,'' changing timing of life cycles between bees and flowers, caused by climate change, has the potential to disrupt a mutually beneficial relationship. (2020-08-19)

Species competition and cooperation influence vulnerability to climate change
Organisms need to work together to adapt to climate change, especially in the presence of competitors, suggests a new study published today in eLife. (2020-08-18)

Researchers hope to save seabirds by calculating the value of their poop
To raise awareness of the importance of seabirds to people and the ecosystems we depend on, a Science & Society article appearing August 6 in the journal Trends in Ecology & Evolution looks at something that most of us find off-putting: their poop. The researchers say that the poop, known as guano and which serves as a source of fertilizer and a key contribution to marine ecosystems, could be worth more than $470 million annually. (2020-08-06)

High time to open up ecological research
Share code and data behind the research please. It's easy, but it will have a major positive impact on progress and trust in science. That is the clear message from a new paper in PLOS Biology. An international team of ecologists found that currently, only about a quarter of the scientific papers in their field publicly shares computer code for analyses. ''To make the science of ecology more transparent and reproducible, sharing is urgently needed.'' (2020-07-29)

Researchers build first AI tool capable of identifying individual birds
New research demonstrates for the first time that artificial intelligence (AI) can be used to train computers to recognise individual birds, a task humans are unable to do. The research is published in the British Ecological Society journal Methods in Ecology and Evolution. (2020-07-27)

Artificial Intelligence to identify individual birds of a same species
Humans have a hard time identifying individual birds just by looking at the patterns on their plumage. An international study involving scientists form the CNRS, Université de Montpellier and the University of Porto in Portugal, among others, has shown how computers can learn to differentiate individual birds of a same species. The results are published on 27 July 2020 in Methods in Ecology and Evolution. (2020-07-27)

How does cooperation evolve?
In nature, organisms often support each other in order to gain an advantage. However, this kind of cooperation contradicts the theory of evolution proposed by Charles Darwin: Why would organisms invest valuable resources to help others? Instead, they should rather use them for themselves, in order to win the evolutionary competition with other species. A new study led by Christian Kost from the University of Osnabrück now solved this puzzle. (2020-07-23)

Michigan coyotes: What's for dinner depends on what the neighbors are having
Michigan coyotes in most of the Lower Peninsula are the ''top dogs'' in the local food chain and can dine on a wide variety of small animals, including rabbits and rodents, along with berries and other plant foods, insects, human garbage and even outdoor pet food. (2020-07-20)

A call to arms: Enlisting private land owners in conservation
In 1872 the United States created Yellowstone, the first National Park in the world. Since then many more parks, monuments, preserves, wildernesses and other protected areas have been created in the USA. Protected areas, like Yellowstone, are invaluable, but are they actually effective at preserving endangered species? And if not, how can future protected areas do better? (2020-07-17)

Evolution makes the world less ragged
How does evolution impact ecological patterns? It helps smooth out the rough edges, says UConn Ecology and Evolutionary Biology Professor Mark Urban. Urban led an international team of researchers through a review of the history of ecological and evolutionary research to establish a framework to better understand evolution's impact on ecosystem patterns. The research is published as a perspective in the Proceeding of the National Academy of Sciences. (2020-07-09)

Versatile symbionts: Reed beetles benefit from bacterial helpers through all life stages
Researchers have investigated the contributions that symbiotic bacteria make to the unusual life cycle and diet of reed beetles. (2020-06-12)

Where have the swans gone?
Nearly 13 kilometres per year: that is the rate at which the wintering area of Bewick's swans has shifted east over the past 50 years. It's a discovery with consequences for the conservation of this migratory species, writes a team of researchers led by the Netherlands Institute of Ecology (NIOO-KNAW) in Global Change Biology. (2020-06-12)

Parasitic fungi keep harmful blue-green algae in check
When a lake is covered with green scums during a warm summer, cyanobacteria -- often called blue-green algae -- are usually involved. Mass development of cyanobacteria is bad for water quality. But cyanobacteria can become sick, when for instance infected by fungal parasites. Researchers found out that these infections do not only kill cyanobacteria, they also make them easier to consume for their natural predators. Fungal parasites thus help to slow down the growth of blue-green algae. (2020-06-09)

Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.