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Current Ecology News and Events

Current Ecology News and Events, Ecology News Articles.
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Surviving insects and plants are tougher than we think
Insect pollinators and plants that have survived the impacts of agricultural intensification may have a greater ability to resist future environmental changes than previously thought, a new study led by the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology has found. (2018-09-18)
Review explores how birds can stay slim, even when they overeat
Noticing that songbirds never seem to get fat despite overeating at bird feeders, London environmental biologist Lewis Halsey wondered whether the amount of energy birds put into singing, fidgeting, or exercising could be adjusted in ways that regulate weight. (2018-09-18)
New light on the controversial question of species abundance and population density
Inspired by the negative results in the recently published largest-scale analysis of the relation between population density and positions in geographic ranges and environmental niches, a team of US and Mexican scientists identified several issues in the methodology used, able to turn the tables in the ongoing debate. (2018-09-17)
Earth's oldest animals formed complex ecological communities
Ediacara biota were forming complex communities tens of millions of years before the Cambrian explosion. (2018-09-17)
Coral bleaching increases disease risk in threatened species
Bleaching events caused by rising water temperatures could increase mortality among a coral species already threatened by disease, says new research by Mote Marine Laboratory and Penn State, US, published in eLife. (2018-09-11)
Encouraging scientists to collaborate on the tropics
'The changing nature of collaboration in tropical ecology and conservation,' recently published in Biotropica, investigates collaboration among scientists, researchers, and other figures whose work advances the field of tropical ecology. (2018-09-10)
Leaf molecules as markers for mycorrhizal associations
Researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology in Jena, Germany, discovered that certain leaf metabolites can be used as markers for mycorrhizal associations. (2018-08-28)
Why are tropical forests so diverse? New study examines role of 'natural enemies'
A new Yale study affirms a long-held hypothesis that the presence of specialized 'natural enemies' promotes tropical biodiversity. (2018-08-23)
For exotic pets, the most popular are also most likely to be released in the wild
Among pet snakes and lizards, the biggest-selling species are also the most likely to be released by their owners -- and to potentially become invasive species, according to a Rutgers study published today in the Journal of Applied Ecology. (2018-08-22)
The bright ways forests affect their environment
New study finds volatile gases emitted by forests increase the amount of diffuse light reaching the forests. (2018-08-20)
Severe declines of mountain hares on Scottish grouse moors
Mountain hare numbers on moorlands in the eastern Highlands have declined to less than one per cent of their initial levels, according to a newly published long-term scientific study. (2018-08-14)
New study sheds light on the ecology of investors in financial markets
Researchers from the University of Turku, Finland, and the University of Palermo, Italy, studied the similarity of investment decisions in the financial market and how the investment strategies used by the investors influence the volatility of the markets by using an exceptionally large set of empirical data. (2018-08-14)
Good news for fishermen: Browning impacts fish less than expected
Water color is getting darker in lakes across the planet. (2018-08-08)
Surviving large carnivores have far-reaching impact
Anywhere large-bodied mammalian carnivore species are present, other, smaller carnivores are less likely to occur, according to an international team of researchers that conducted the first global assessment of carnivore interactions using camera trap data. (2018-08-08)
Forests crucial for limiting climate change to 1.5 degrees
Trying to tackle climate change by replacing forests with crops for bioenergy power stations that capture carbon dioxide (CO2) could instead increase the amount of CO2 in the atmosphere, scientists say. (2018-08-07)
The new tree of life of freshwater macroinvertebrates in the European continent
A study from the Faculty of Biology and the Biodiversity Research Institute of the University of Barcelona (IRBio-UB) analysed how water macroinvertebrate species, such as beetles, mosquitos and dragonflies, evolved and diversified since their beginnings. (2018-08-03)
New scholarly focus needed to help solve global food crisis, U-M experts say
The global food system is unsustainable and urgently needs an overhaul. (2018-07-23)
How plant breeding technologies could make fruits and vegetables more exciting to eat
Forget vegetables with dull colors and fuzzy skin or fruits that lack of flavor -- the produce aisle of the future could offer plant products that are designed for creative cooks and fussy eaters. (2018-07-19)
Social isolation: Animals that break away from the pack can influence evolution
For some animals -- such as beetles, ants, toads, and primates -- short-term social isolation can be just as vital as social interaction to development and long-term evolution. (2018-07-17)
Sap-sucking bugs manipulate their host plants' metabolism for their own benefit
Researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology, Germany, have shown for the first time that free-living, sap-sucking bugs can manipulate the metabolism of their host plants to create stable, nutritious feeding sites. (2018-07-17)
Moving fish farms enables seagrass meadows to thrive, study shows
Off the coast of Cyprus in the Mediterranean Sea, many fish farms have been moved into deeper waters -- and on the seabeds beneath their previous locations, the meadows are flourishing once again. (2018-07-12)
Scientists on Twitter: Preaching to the choir or singing from the rooftops?
SFU professor Isabelle Cote published a paper today in FACETS on Twitter use for scientists. (2018-07-12)
Dodder genome sequencing sheds light on evolution of plant parasitism
To gain insight into the evolution of dodders, and provide important resources for studying the physiology and ecology of parasitic plants, the laboratory of Dr. (2018-07-11)
Humans evolved in partially isolated populations scattered across Africa
The textbook narrative of human evolution casts Homo sapiens as evolving from a single ancestral population in one region of Africa around 300,000 years ago. (2018-07-11)
Ecology and AI
Using more than three million photographs from the citizen science project Snapshot Serengeti, researchers trained a deep learning algorithm to automatically identify, count and describe animals in their natural habitats. (2018-07-10)
Farming fish alter 'cropping' strategies under high CO2
Fish that 'farm' their own patches of seaweed alter their 'cropping' practices under high CO2 conditions, researchers at the University of Adelaide in Australia have found. (2018-07-09)
Spearfishing makes fishes more timid
Fisheries scientists from the Leibniz-Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries (IGB) and international colleagues have studied the response of fish in the Mediterranean Sea to spearfishing. (2018-07-03)
The scent of a man: What odors do female blackbuck find enticing in a male?
Jyothi Nair, a student from Uma Ramakrishnan's group at the National Centre for Biological Sciences (NCBS), Bangalore, collaborated with Shannon Olsson's team, also from NCBS, to develop a pipeline for investigating odors in a quick, efficient way. (2018-06-29)
Journal explores database that quantifies environmental impacts in a 'global' world
In a special issue, Yale's Journal of Industrial Ecology examines a new global database that offers new clarity on the complex links between international trade, consumption, and environmental impact. (2018-06-25)
Lion conservation research can be bolstered by input from a wide-range of professionals
The conservation of lions, while also maintaining the well-being of people that live around them, is a complex problem that should be addressed by a wide-range of professionals working together. (2018-06-19)
Life in the fast lane: USU ecologist says dispersal ability linked to plants' life cycles
Utah State University ecologist Noelle Beckman says seed dispersal is an essential, yet overlooked, process of plant demography, but it's difficult to empirically observe, measure and assess its full influence. (2018-06-17)
Female bats judge a singer by his song
Female lesser short-tailed bats can size up a potential mate just from his singing. (2018-06-06)
Camouflaged plants use the same tricks as animals
Plants use many of the same methods as animals to camouflage themselves, a new study shows. (2018-06-06)
What the size distribution of organisms tells us about the energetic efficiency of a lake
The size distribution of organisms in a lake facilitates robust conclusions to be drawn on the energy efficiency in the food web, as researchers from the Leibniz-Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries (IGB) and international colleagues have now demonstrated empirically. (2018-06-05)
Tree species vital to restoring disturbed tropical forests
A family of trees with high drought tolerance could be crucial in restoring the world's deforested and degraded tropical lands, according to new research involving the University of Stirling. (2018-05-29)
Mongooses inherit behavior from role models rather than parents
Young mongooses learn lifelong habits from role models rather than inheriting them from genetic parents, new research shows. (2018-05-24)
Giraffes surprise biologists yet again
New research from the University of Bristol has highlighted how little we know about giraffe behaviour and ecology. (2018-05-18)
Migratory animals carry more parasites, says study
Every year, billions of animals migrate across the globe, carrying parasites with them and encountering parasites through their travels. (2018-05-08)
Weeds take over kelp in high CO2 oceans
Weedy plants will thrive and displace long-lived, ecologically valuable kelp forests under forecast ocean acidification, new research from the University of Adelaide shows. (2018-05-03)
Are damselflies in distress?
Damselflies are evolving rapidly as they expand their range in response to a warming climate, according to new research led by Macquarie University researchers in Sydney. (2018-04-30)
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