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Current Ecology News and Events, Ecology News Articles.
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Moving fish farms enables seagrass meadows to thrive, study shows
Off the coast of Cyprus in the Mediterranean Sea, many fish farms have been moved into deeper waters -- and on the seabeds beneath their previous locations, the meadows are flourishing once again. (2018-07-12)
Scientists on Twitter: Preaching to the choir or singing from the rooftops?
SFU professor Isabelle Cote published a paper today in FACETS on Twitter use for scientists. (2018-07-12)
Dodder genome sequencing sheds light on evolution of plant parasitism
To gain insight into the evolution of dodders, and provide important resources for studying the physiology and ecology of parasitic plants, the laboratory of Dr. (2018-07-11)
Humans evolved in partially isolated populations scattered across Africa
The textbook narrative of human evolution casts Homo sapiens as evolving from a single ancestral population in one region of Africa around 300,000 years ago. (2018-07-11)
Ecology and AI
Using more than three million photographs from the citizen science project Snapshot Serengeti, researchers trained a deep learning algorithm to automatically identify, count and describe animals in their natural habitats. (2018-07-10)
Farming fish alter 'cropping' strategies under high CO2
Fish that 'farm' their own patches of seaweed alter their 'cropping' practices under high CO2 conditions, researchers at the University of Adelaide in Australia have found. (2018-07-09)
Spearfishing makes fishes more timid
Fisheries scientists from the Leibniz-Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries (IGB) and international colleagues have studied the response of fish in the Mediterranean Sea to spearfishing. (2018-07-03)
The scent of a man: What odors do female blackbuck find enticing in a male?
Jyothi Nair, a student from Uma Ramakrishnan's group at the National Centre for Biological Sciences (NCBS), Bangalore, collaborated with Shannon Olsson's team, also from NCBS, to develop a pipeline for investigating odors in a quick, efficient way. (2018-06-29)
Journal explores database that quantifies environmental impacts in a 'global' world
In a special issue, Yale's Journal of Industrial Ecology examines a new global database that offers new clarity on the complex links between international trade, consumption, and environmental impact. (2018-06-25)
Lion conservation research can be bolstered by input from a wide-range of professionals
The conservation of lions, while also maintaining the well-being of people that live around them, is a complex problem that should be addressed by a wide-range of professionals working together. (2018-06-19)
Life in the fast lane: USU ecologist says dispersal ability linked to plants' life cycles
Utah State University ecologist Noelle Beckman says seed dispersal is an essential, yet overlooked, process of plant demography, but it's difficult to empirically observe, measure and assess its full influence. (2018-06-17)
Female bats judge a singer by his song
Female lesser short-tailed bats can size up a potential mate just from his singing. (2018-06-06)
Camouflaged plants use the same tricks as animals
Plants use many of the same methods as animals to camouflage themselves, a new study shows. (2018-06-06)
What the size distribution of organisms tells us about the energetic efficiency of a lake
The size distribution of organisms in a lake facilitates robust conclusions to be drawn on the energy efficiency in the food web, as researchers from the Leibniz-Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries (IGB) and international colleagues have now demonstrated empirically. (2018-06-05)
Tree species vital to restoring disturbed tropical forests
A family of trees with high drought tolerance could be crucial in restoring the world's deforested and degraded tropical lands, according to new research involving the University of Stirling. (2018-05-29)
Mongooses inherit behavior from role models rather than parents
Young mongooses learn lifelong habits from role models rather than inheriting them from genetic parents, new research shows. (2018-05-24)
Giraffes surprise biologists yet again
New research from the University of Bristol has highlighted how little we know about giraffe behaviour and ecology. (2018-05-18)
Migratory animals carry more parasites, says study
Every year, billions of animals migrate across the globe, carrying parasites with them and encountering parasites through their travels. (2018-05-08)
Weeds take over kelp in high CO2 oceans
Weedy plants will thrive and displace long-lived, ecologically valuable kelp forests under forecast ocean acidification, new research from the University of Adelaide shows. (2018-05-03)
Are damselflies in distress?
Damselflies are evolving rapidly as they expand their range in response to a warming climate, according to new research led by Macquarie University researchers in Sydney. (2018-04-30)
Honeybees are struggling to get enough good bacteria
Modern monoculture farming, commercial forestry and even well-intentioned gardeners could be making it harder for honeybees to store food and fight off diseases, a new study suggests. (2018-04-17)
Marine fish won an evolutionary lottery 66 million years ago, UCLA biologists report
Why do the Earth's oceans contain such a staggering diversity of fish of so many different sizes, shapes, colors and ecologies? (2018-04-17)
What's in a niche? Time to rethink microbial ecology, say researchers
Scientists in Canada, the United States and Europe are looking to rewrite the textbook on microbial ecology. (2018-04-16)
How social media helps scientists get the message across
Analyzing the famous academic aphorism 'publish or perish' through a modern digital lens, a group of emerging ecologists and conservation scientists wanted to see whether communicating their new research discoveries through social media -- primarily Twitter -- eventually leads to higher citations years down the road. (2018-04-12)
Deeper understanding of species roles in ecosystems
A species' traits define the role it plays in the ecosystem in which it lives -- this is the conclusion of a study carried out by researchers at Linköping University, Sweden. (2018-04-12)
How cheetahs outsmart lions and hyenas
Cheetahs in the Serengeti National Park adopt different strategies while eating to deal with threats from top predators such as lions or hyenas. (2018-04-10)
1C rise in atmospheric temperature causes rapid changes to world's largest High Arctic lake
An interdisciplinary team of scientists examining everything from glaciology to freshwater ecology discovered drastic changes over the past decade to the world's largest High Arctic lake. (2018-04-06)
Facilitating coral restoration
Global declines of coral reefs -- particularly in the Caribbean -- have spurred efforts to grow corals in underwater nurseries and transplant them to enable recovery. (2018-04-04)
Dolphins tear up nets as fish numbers fall
Fishing nets suffer six times more damage when dolphins are around - and overfishing is forcing dolphins and fishermen ever closer together, new research shows. (2018-03-29)
Themed issue lays foundation for emerging field of collective movement ecology
Collective movement is one of the great natural wonders on Earth and has long captured our imaginations. (2018-03-26)
Rapid adaptation
Biologists discover that female purple sea urchins prime their progeny to succeed in the face of stress. (2018-03-26)
Insects could help us find new yeasts for big business
Yeasts are tiny fungi -- but they play key roles in producing everything from beer and cheese to industrial chemicals and biofuels. (2018-03-21)
A method for predicting the impact of global warming on disease
Scientists have devised a new method that can be used to better understand the likely impact of global warming on diseases mediated by parasites, such as malaria. (2018-03-20)
Fussy eating prevents mongoose family feuds
Mongooses living in large groups develop 'specialist' diets so they don't have to fight over food, new research shows. (2018-03-14)
Instability of wildlife trade does not encourage trappers to conserve natural habitats
The collection of wildlife for trade is unreliable and financially risky, thus limiting opportunities to incentivise biodiversity conservation at a local level, according to research by the University of Kent. (2018-03-07)
Research brief: Shifting tundra vegetation spells change for arctic animals
For nearly two decades, scientists have noted dramatic changes in arctic tundra habitat. (2018-03-06)
Great mystery unravelled: Most viruses and bacteria fall from the sky
The mechanisms responsible for the dispersal of these microorganisms at the global scale are still practically unknown. (2018-03-01)
Nuptial gifts beat pheromones
Unlike many other species, male hunting spiders do not use chemical signals such as sex pheromones to attract a mate. (2018-03-01)
Climate change, evolution, and what happens when researchers are also friends
A new study in Trends in Ecology and Evolution, which addresses how climate change is affecting the evolution of organisms, underscores the need for evolutionary, ecosystem and climate scientists to work together to better understand eco-evolutionary feedback dynamics. (2018-02-20)
What fluffy bunnies can tell us about domestication: It didn't go the way you think
It turns out that nobody knows when rabbits were domesticated. (2018-02-14)
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