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Current Ecology News and Events

Current Ecology News and Events, Ecology News Articles.
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Predicting insect feeding preferences after deforestation
Understanding how parasitoids and hosts interact, and how their interactions change with human influence, is critically important to understanding ecosystems. (2017-10-06)
Evolutionary crop research: Ego-plants give lower yield
Evolutionary biologists are calling for a shift in the usual plant breeding paradigm, which is based on selecting the fittest plants to create new varieties. (2017-10-02)
Panda habitat shrinking, becoming more fragmented
Using remote sensing data, Chinese and US scientists have re-assessed the conservation status of the giant panda. (2017-09-25)
Fish have complex personalities, research shows
Tiny fish called Trinidadian guppies have individual 'personalities', new research shows. (2017-09-24)
10,000-year-old DNA proves when fish colonialized our lakes
DNA in lake sediment forms a natural archive displaying when various fish species colonized lakes after the glacial period. (2017-09-20)
Convergent evolution of mimetic butterflies confounds classification
David Lohman, associate professor of biology at The City College of New York's Division of Science, is co-author of a landmark paper on butterflies 'An illustrated checklist of the genus Elymnias Hübner, 1818 (Nymphalidae, Satyrinae).' Lohman and his colleagues from Taiwan and Indonesia revise the taxonomy of Asian palmflies in the genus Elymnias in light of a forthcoming study on the butterflies' evolutionary history. (2017-09-20)
What's the latest on gut microbiota?
How many undergraduate classes in microbiology -- or any scientific field, for that matter -- can say they're published in a peer-reviewed journal? (2017-09-19)
The benefits and pitfalls of urban green spaces
With the rapid expansion of the urban landscape, successfully managing ecosystems in built areas has never been more important. (2017-09-13)
Ethnic diversity in schools may be good for students' grades, a UC Davis study suggests
The findings suggest that schools might look for ways to provide cross-ethnic interaction among students to take advantage of ethnic diversity. (2017-09-11)
Birds are on the move in the face of climate change
Research on birds in northern Europe reveals that there is an ongoing considerable species turnover due to climate change and due to land use and other direct human influences. (2017-09-07)
When not to eat your kids
Even though it is known to be a cannibal, the mangrove rivulus or killifish of the Americas will never eat one of its own embryos, even if it is hungry. (2017-09-05)
Orange is the new green: How orange peels revived a Costa Rican forest
In the mid-1990s, 1,000 truckloads of orange peels and orange pulp were purposefully unloaded onto a barren pasture in a Costa Rican national park. (2017-08-22)
Mechanisms explaining positional diversity of the hindlimb in tetrapod evolution
Elucidating how body parts in their earliest recognizable form are assembled in tetrapods during development is essential for understanding the nature of morphological evolution. (2017-08-18)
The irresistible fragrance of dying vinegar flies
Vinegar flies should normally try to avoid their sick conspecifics to prevent becoming infected themselves. (2017-08-16)
Jackdaws flap their wings to save energy
For the first time, researchers have observed that birds that fly actively and flap their wings save energy. (2017-08-11)
Desert tortoises can't take the heat of roadside fencing
Desert tortoises pace back and forth and can overheat by roadside fencing meant to help them, according to a study by the University of California, Davis, and the University of Georgia. (2017-08-04)
A dolphin diet
The health of dolphin populations worldwide depends on sustained access to robust food sources. (2017-08-02)
How camouflaged birds decide where to blend in
Animals that rely on camouflage can choose the best places to conceal themselves based on their individual appearance, new research shows. (2017-07-31)
Hostage situation or harmony? Researchers rethink symbiosis
Relationships where two organisms depend on each other, known as symbiosis, evoke images of partnership and cooperation. (2017-07-27)
Seeing in the dark: Minus sunlight, a general theory reveals universal patterns in ecology
By omitting mechanistic drivers such as sunlight, a statistical theory accurately describes broad ecological patterns in a Panama forest, as well as other natural systems and communities. (2017-07-27)
Researchers overturn wisdom regarding efficacy of next-generation DNA techniques
Metagenomics enables us to investigate microbial ecology at a much larger scale than ever before and sheds light upon the previously invisible diversity of microscopic life. (2017-07-26)
Dodder: A parasite involved in the plant alarm system
A team of scientists from the Kunming Institute of Botany in China and the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology in Jena has discovered that parasitic plants of the genus Cuscuta (dodder) not only deplete nutrients from their host plants, but also function as important 'information brokers' among neighboring plants, when insects feed on host plants. (2017-07-25)
The way rivers function reflects their ecological status and is rarely explored
A study conducted by a UPV/EHU-University of the Basque Country research group within the framework of the European Globaqua project proposes going beyond the study of river ecosystems and incorporating into the studies routinely carried out a set of processes that regulate not only the fluxes of matter but also the fluxes of energy within an ecosystem. (2017-07-20)
Sibling bonding is stronger when dad's around
For many female mammals, mothers and maternal sisters dominate all aspects of an individual's social life. (2017-07-18)
Genome sequence of a diabetes-prone rodent
Sequencing the genome of the sand rat, a desert rodent susceptible to nutritionally induced diabetes, revealed an unusual chromosome region skewed toward G and C nucleotides. (2017-07-04)
Bumble bees make a beeline for larger flowers
Bumble bees create foraging routes by using their experience to select nectar-rich, high-rewarding flowers. (2017-06-29)
The value of nature
Money may not grow on trees, but trees themselves and all that they provide have a dollar value nonetheless. (2017-06-28)
How grassland management without the loss of species works
The intensive management of grasslands is bad for biodiversity. However, a study by the Terrestrial Ecology Research Group at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has brought a ray of hope: If different forms of management are optimally distributed within a region, this can lead to higher yields without the loss of insect species. (2017-06-27)
Predicting future outcomes in the natural world
When pesticides and intentional fires fail to eradicate an invasive plant species, declaring biological war may be the best option. (2017-06-26)
Critical gaps in our knowledge of where infectious diseases occur
Today Scientists have called for action. The scientific journal Nature Ecology & Evolution have published a joint statement from scientists at Center for Macroecology, Evolution and Climate, University of Copenhagen and North Carolina State University. (2017-06-22)
Ecology insights improve plant biomass degradation by microorganisms
Microbes are widely used to break down plant biomass into sugars, which can be used as sustainable building blocks for novel biocompounds. (2017-06-22)
City rats: Why scientists are not hot on their tails
Researchers argue they need greater access to urban properties if they are to win the war against rats. (2017-06-20)
Board game helps Mexican coffee farmers grasp complex ecological interactions
A chess-like board game developed by University of Michigan researchers helps small-scale Mexican coffee farmers better understand the complex interactions between the insects and fungi that live on their plants -- and how some of those creatures can help provide natural pest control. (2017-06-20)
Mixed conifer and beech forests grow more as they complement each other
Complementarity between Scots pine and broad-leafed species in the use of the available resources, such as water, may increase the growth of mixed forests comprising both species compared with pure forests, those comprising only one. (2017-06-19)
Taking circular economy to the next level
While principles of a circular economy have been adopted by businesses, governments and NGOs, leading researchers say it's time to take the discussion and analysis to the next level. (2017-06-15)
Genetic differences across species guide vocal learning in juvenile songbirds
Juvenile birds discriminate and selectively learn their own species' songs even when primarily exposed to the songs of other species, but the underlying mechanism has remained unknown. (2017-06-12)
Biodiversity is 3-D
The species-area relationship (SAC) is a long-time considered pattern in ecology and is discussed in most of academic Ecology books. (2017-06-09)
Sequestering blue carbon through better management of coastal ecosystems
Focusing on the management of carbon stores within vegetated coastal habitats provides an opportunity to mitigate some aspects of global warming. (2017-05-19)
Brain's hippocampal volume, social environment affect adolescent depression
Research on depression in adolescents in recent years has focused on how the physical brain and social experiences interact. (2017-05-17)
Fishing can cause slowly reversible changes in gene expression
Cohort after cohort, fishing typically removes large fish from the population and can lead to rapid evolutionary changes in exploited fish populations. (2017-05-16)
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