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Current Ecology News and Events

Current Ecology News and Events, Ecology News Articles.
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Method assesses health and size of lizard populations
Monitoring programs that survey many wildlife species at the same time across large geographic regions are important for informing conservation decisions, but reptiles are often missing from these efforts because they are difficult to survey. (2019-02-21)
Dermal disruption: Amphibian skin bacteria is more diverse in cold, variable environments
Researchers swabbed more than 2300 animals representing 205 amphibian species to better understand the ecology of their skin bacteria. (2019-02-21)
How one gene in a tiny fish may alter an aquatic ecosystem
Variations in a single gene in a tiny fish alter how they interact with their environment, according to research led by the University of Pennsylvania's Seth Rudman, a postdoctoral researcher. (2019-02-06)
Scientists strategize for better conservation plans
Endangered and invasive species may be better managed in the future with new techniques outlined by a Texas A&M University scientist and others. (2019-02-01)
Modern humans replaced Neanderthals in southern Spain 44,000 years ago
The University of Cordoba, in collaboration with the University of Granada, participated in an international study published today in the journal Nature Ecology and Evolution, proving that Neanderthals were replaced by modern humans in southern Iberia 5,000 years before than previously thought (2019-01-30)
Bird beaks did not adapt to food types as previously thought
A study, led by the University of Bristol, has shed some new light on how the beaks of birds have adapted over time. (2019-01-22)
Let's prepare now so farming insects as food is environmentally friendly, say scientists
As whole-roasted crickets gain traction as a protein-rich snack and restaurants experiment with mealworms on the menu, there's still 'an overwhelming lack of knowledge' concerning the ecological sustainability of the emerging, multi-million-dollar insects-as-food industry, say researchers at the Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences. (2019-01-14)
New mathematical model can help save endangered species
One of the greatest challenges in saving endangered species is to predict if an animal population will die out. (2019-01-11)
New research is using drones to tackle climate change
A team of Nottingham scientists is using drones to survey woody climbing plants and better understand how they may affect the carbon balance of tropical rainforests. (2019-01-09)
ESA Tipsheet for January 2019
Get a sneak peek into these new scientific papers, publishing on January 3, 2019 in the Ecological Society of America's journal Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment. (2018-12-28)
More young and other traits help mammals adapt to urban environments
Species of mammals that live in urban environments produce more young compared to other mammals. (2018-12-21)
HKU fossil imaging helps push back feather origins by 70 million years
In a new study published in the journal Nature Ecology & Evolution, an international team led by Professor Baoyu Jiang of Nanjing University and including Dr Michael Pittman of the Department of Earth Sciences, the University of Hong Kong, shows that pterosaurs had at least four types of feathers in common with their close relatives the dinosaurs, pushing back the origin of feathers by some 70 million years. (2018-12-18)
Scientists revealed how water fleas settled during the Ice Age
A new study shows that the roots used by three close species of microscopic Daphnia crustaceans to settle across the territory of Northern Eurasia differed greatly. (2018-12-17)
Species at the extremes of the food chain evolve faster, study says
Reef fish species at the extremes of the food chain -- those that are strict herbivores or strict fish predators -- evolve faster than fish species in the middle of the food chain with a more varied diet, according to a new study published in Nature Ecology and Evolution. (2018-12-17)
Plants' defense against insects is a bouquet
Michigan State University scholar Andrea Glassmire and her colleagues have revealed how the mixture of chemical weapons deployed by plants keeps marauding insects off base better than a one-note defense. (2018-12-13)
Increasing seal population will not harm largest fish stocks in the Baltic
Seals feeding on fish does not decrease fish stocks of Baltic cod, herring and sprat the most -- climate change, nutrient load and fisheries do, shows a new study from Stockholm University. (2018-12-10)
Frog sex in the city
How do animals adapt to urban environments? In the case of the Tungara frog, city males put on a more elaborate mating display than males in forested areas. (2018-12-10)
Can rice filter water from ag fields?
While it's an important part of our diets, new research shows that rice plants can be used in a different way, too: to clean runoff from farms before it gets into rivers, lakes, and streams. (2018-12-05)
Enhancing our vision of the past
An international group of scientists led by researchers from the University of Bristol have advanced our understanding of how ancient animals saw the world by combining the study of fossils and genetics. (2018-12-04)
In death, Lonesome George reveals why giant tortoises live so long
Genetic analysis of DNA from Lonesome George and samples from other giant tortoises of the Galapagos -- which can live more than 100 years in captivity -- found they possessed a number of gene variants linked to DNA repair, immune response, and cancer suppression not possessed by shorter-lived vertebrates. (2018-12-03)
Predators drive Nemo's relationship with an unlikely friend
Predators have been identified as the shaping force behind mutually beneficial relationships between species such as clownfish and anemones. (2018-11-27)
Something to chew on
Cows eat grass. It seems simple enough. But just which kind of grass cows and their vegetarian comrades munch on can influence the entire ecosystem. (2018-11-26)
Study predicts decreasing brown bear habitat due to climate change
A recent analysis of data related to the brown bear (Ursus arctos) estimates that suitable habitat will be reduced by 11 percent across Central Asia and the Asian Highlands by 2050 due to climate change, predominantly due to the changes in temperature and precipitation. (2018-11-21)
Dramatic change in seabirds' winter food source over past 30 years
The availability of a key prey for seabirds has changed dramatically over the past three decades, particularly in winter, with possible consequences for their population numbers. (2018-11-21)
Google data shows public interest in conservation is rising
The public's interest in conservation is rising. Based on an adapted version of Google Trends -- which tracks user searches on Google -- the results show that people search for conservation just as often as they do for climate change. (2018-11-19)
Warming oceans lead to more fur seal deaths from hookworm infection
Rising ocean temperatures are putting fur seal pups at greater risk of death from hookworm infections, according to new findings published in eLife. (2018-11-06)
How people power can track alien species -- Study
New research published in the Nature journal Scientific Data shows how the public can play a vital role in helping to track invasive species. (2018-10-24)
Research brief: Predicting how native plants return to abandoned farm fields
Tracking how seeds move--or disperse--can be difficult because of a seed's small size. (2018-10-23)
Population aging and decrease may have socioeconomic and environmental benefits
Environmental scientists argue that societies should embrace population aging and decrease in an opinion appearing Oct. (2018-10-16)
UMBC researchers develop new method to address deep-seated biases in science
A new statistical method that tests for equivalence, rather than difference, has a role to play in dismantling gender and publication biases in science. (2018-10-16)
How beetle larvae thrive on carrion
The burying beetle Nicrophorus vespilloides buries the cadavers of small animals to use them as a food source for its offspring. (2018-10-15)
Cobra cannibalism more prevalent than previously thought
Researchers in South Africa's Kalahari Desert found a large male cape cobra devouring another smaller male of the same species. (2018-10-02)
University of Oxford: Bold male birds fall faster and harder for their partners
Research from Oxford University has revealed that bold male birds focus on forming strong relationships with their future breeding partners while shy male birds play the field. (2018-10-01)
Desert ants have an amazing odor memory
Desert ants can quickly learn many different food odors and remember them for the rest of their lives. (2018-09-24)
Surviving insects and plants are tougher than we think
Insect pollinators and plants that have survived the impacts of agricultural intensification may have a greater ability to resist future environmental changes than previously thought, a new study led by the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology has found. (2018-09-18)
Review explores how birds can stay slim, even when they overeat
Noticing that songbirds never seem to get fat despite overeating at bird feeders, London environmental biologist Lewis Halsey wondered whether the amount of energy birds put into singing, fidgeting, or exercising could be adjusted in ways that regulate weight. (2018-09-18)
Earth's oldest animals formed complex ecological communities
Ediacara biota were forming complex communities tens of millions of years before the Cambrian explosion. (2018-09-17)
Encouraging scientists to collaborate on the tropics
'The changing nature of collaboration in tropical ecology and conservation,' recently published in Biotropica, investigates collaboration among scientists, researchers, and other figures whose work advances the field of tropical ecology. (2018-09-10)
Leaf molecules as markers for mycorrhizal associations
Researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology in Jena, Germany, discovered that certain leaf metabolites can be used as markers for mycorrhizal associations. (2018-08-28)
Why are tropical forests so diverse? New study examines role of 'natural enemies'
A new Yale study affirms a long-held hypothesis that the presence of specialized 'natural enemies' promotes tropical biodiversity. (2018-08-23)
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