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Current Ecology News and Events

Current Ecology News and Events, Ecology News Articles.
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Study: Forest resilience declines in face of wildfires, climate change
The research team said that with a warming climate, forests are losing their resilience to wildfires. (2017-12-14)
African deforestation not as great as feared
The loss of forests in Africa in the past century is substantially less than previously estimated, an analysis of historical records and paleontology evidence by Yale researchers shows. (2017-12-11)
Study finds variation within species plays critical role in health of ecosystems
Concerns about biodiversity tend to focus on the loss of species, but a new study suggests that the loss of variation within species can also have important and unexpected consequences on the environment. (2017-12-11)
Deadly cryptococcal fungi found in public spaces in South Africa
This is the first time that both Cryptococcus neoformans and Cryptococcus gattii have been found in such large numbers on trees in South Africa. (2017-12-06)
Study finds variation within species is a critical aspect of biodiversity
Concerns about biodiversity tend to focus on the loss of species from ecosystems, but a new study suggests that the loss of variation within species can also have important ecological consequences. (2017-12-05)
Men with HPV are 20 times more likely to be reinfected after one year
An analysis of HPV in men shows that infection with one type strongly increased the risk of reinfection of the same type. (2017-12-05)
Invasive plants have unprecedented ability to pioneer new continents and climates
'This could be a game-changer for invasive species risk assessment and conservation,' one researcher says. (2017-12-04)
Polar bear blogs reveal dangerous gap between climate-change facts and opinions
Climate-change discussions on social media are very influential. A new study in BioScience shows that when it comes to iconic topics such as polar bears and retreating sea ice, climate blogs fall into two distinct camps. (2017-11-29)
Maize pest exploits plant defense compounds to protect itself
The western corn rootworm continues to be on the rise in Europe. (2017-11-27)
Climate change models of bird impacts pass the test
A major study looking at changes in where UK birds have been found over the past 40 years has validated the latest climate change models being used to forecast impacts on birds and other animals. (2017-11-21)
What makes soil, soil? Researchers find hidden clues in DNA
Ever wondered what makes a soil, soil? And could soil from the Amazon rainforest really be the same as soil from your garden? (2017-11-20)
Plant respiration could become a bigger feedback on climate than expected
New research suggests that plant respiration is a larger source of carbon emissions than previously thought, and warns that as the world warms, this may reduce the ability of Earth's land surface to absorb emissions due to fossil fuel burning. (2017-11-17)
Warmer water signals change for Scotland's shags
An increasingly catholic diet among European shags at one of Scotland's best-studied breeding colonies has been linked to long-term climate change and may have important implications for Scotland's seabirds. (2017-11-17)
Additive manufacturing and sustainability: The environmental implications of 3-D printing
In a new special issue, Yale's Journal of Industrial Ecology presents the cutting-edge research on this emerging field, providing important insights into its environmental, energy, and health impacts. (2017-11-14)
Flower attracts insects by pretending to be a mushroom
The mysterious flowers of Aspidistra elatior are found on the southern Japanese island of Kuroshima. (2017-11-14)
Crime-scene technique used to track turtles
Scientists have used satellite tracking and a crime-scene technique to discover an important feeding ground for green turtles in the Mediterranean. (2017-11-06)
Protecting 'high carbon' rainforest areas also protects threatened wildlife
Protecting 'high carbon' rainforest areas also protects threatened wildlife. (2017-11-06)
Early bloomers: Statistical tool reveals climate change impacts on plants
Scientists from Utah State University, Harvard University, the University of Maryland, Rocky Mountain Biological Laboratory, Boston University and McGill University announce statistical tool to extract information from current and historical plant data. (2017-11-06)
Protecting the wild: Baylor professor helps to minimize recreation disturbance to wildlife
In a cover story published this week in the Ecological Society of America's premier journal, Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment, Kevin J. (2017-11-03)
Predicting insect feeding preferences after deforestation
Understanding how parasitoids and hosts interact, and how their interactions change with human influence, is critically important to understanding ecosystems. (2017-10-06)
Evolutionary crop research: Ego-plants give lower yield
Evolutionary biologists are calling for a shift in the usual plant breeding paradigm, which is based on selecting the fittest plants to create new varieties. (2017-10-02)
Panda habitat shrinking, becoming more fragmented
Using remote sensing data, Chinese and US scientists have re-assessed the conservation status of the giant panda. (2017-09-25)
Fish have complex personalities, research shows
Tiny fish called Trinidadian guppies have individual 'personalities', new research shows. (2017-09-24)
10,000-year-old DNA proves when fish colonialized our lakes
DNA in lake sediment forms a natural archive displaying when various fish species colonized lakes after the glacial period. (2017-09-20)
Convergent evolution of mimetic butterflies confounds classification
David Lohman, associate professor of biology at The City College of New York's Division of Science, is co-author of a landmark paper on butterflies 'An illustrated checklist of the genus Elymnias Hübner, 1818 (Nymphalidae, Satyrinae).' Lohman and his colleagues from Taiwan and Indonesia revise the taxonomy of Asian palmflies in the genus Elymnias in light of a forthcoming study on the butterflies' evolutionary history. (2017-09-20)
What's the latest on gut microbiota?
How many undergraduate classes in microbiology -- or any scientific field, for that matter -- can say they're published in a peer-reviewed journal? (2017-09-19)
The benefits and pitfalls of urban green spaces
With the rapid expansion of the urban landscape, successfully managing ecosystems in built areas has never been more important. (2017-09-13)
Ethnic diversity in schools may be good for students' grades, a UC Davis study suggests
The findings suggest that schools might look for ways to provide cross-ethnic interaction among students to take advantage of ethnic diversity. (2017-09-11)
Birds are on the move in the face of climate change
Research on birds in northern Europe reveals that there is an ongoing considerable species turnover due to climate change and due to land use and other direct human influences. (2017-09-07)
When not to eat your kids
Even though it is known to be a cannibal, the mangrove rivulus or killifish of the Americas will never eat one of its own embryos, even if it is hungry. (2017-09-05)
Orange is the new green: How orange peels revived a Costa Rican forest
In the mid-1990s, 1,000 truckloads of orange peels and orange pulp were purposefully unloaded onto a barren pasture in a Costa Rican national park. (2017-08-22)
Mechanisms explaining positional diversity of the hindlimb in tetrapod evolution
Elucidating how body parts in their earliest recognizable form are assembled in tetrapods during development is essential for understanding the nature of morphological evolution. (2017-08-18)
The irresistible fragrance of dying vinegar flies
Vinegar flies should normally try to avoid their sick conspecifics to prevent becoming infected themselves. (2017-08-16)
Jackdaws flap their wings to save energy
For the first time, researchers have observed that birds that fly actively and flap their wings save energy. (2017-08-11)
Desert tortoises can't take the heat of roadside fencing
Desert tortoises pace back and forth and can overheat by roadside fencing meant to help them, according to a study by the University of California, Davis, and the University of Georgia. (2017-08-04)
A dolphin diet
The health of dolphin populations worldwide depends on sustained access to robust food sources. (2017-08-02)
How camouflaged birds decide where to blend in
Animals that rely on camouflage can choose the best places to conceal themselves based on their individual appearance, new research shows. (2017-07-31)
Hostage situation or harmony? Researchers rethink symbiosis
Relationships where two organisms depend on each other, known as symbiosis, evoke images of partnership and cooperation. (2017-07-27)
Seeing in the dark: Minus sunlight, a general theory reveals universal patterns in ecology
By omitting mechanistic drivers such as sunlight, a statistical theory accurately describes broad ecological patterns in a Panama forest, as well as other natural systems and communities. (2017-07-27)
Researchers overturn wisdom regarding efficacy of next-generation DNA techniques
Metagenomics enables us to investigate microbial ecology at a much larger scale than ever before and sheds light upon the previously invisible diversity of microscopic life. (2017-07-26)
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