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Research brief: Global trends in nature's contributions to people
A U of M-led study examined the risks to human well-being and prosperity stemming from ongoing environmental degradation. (2020-12-07)

UTSA researchers study the effects of parental job loss on families during the pandemic
A team of UTSA researchers has discovered that economic implications because of COVID-19 can have a devastating ripple effect on children. Monica Lawson, assistant professor of psychology, Megan Piel, assistant professor of social work and Michaela Simon, psychology graduate student in the UTSA College for Health, Community and Policy, have recently published a research article on the effects of parental job loss during the COVID-19 pandemic and risk of psychological and physical abuse toward children. (2020-12-07)

Having it both ways: a combined strategy in catalyst design for Suzuki cross-couplings
cientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) have designed a novel catalyst for the Suzuki cross-coupling reaction, which is widely used in the synthesis of industrial and pharmaceutical organic chemicals. Their strategy of loading an intermetallic Pd compound onto a support sharing the same element yields a stable and cost-effective catalyst that outperforms commercially available alternatives. (2020-12-02)

Stimulus relief funds increase social distancing to stop spread of COVID-19
New research suggests that that those suffering from economic hardships are less likely comply with new stay-at-home orders; however, these same U.S. residents would be more likely to adhere to the new public health guidelines if their households received stimulus funds. (2020-12-01)

Covid-19 shutdowns disproportionately affected low-income black households
Princeton University researchers now report that low-income Black households experienced greater job loss, more food and medicine insecurity, and higher indebtedness in the early months of #COVID19 compared to white or Latinx low-income households. (2020-11-30)

Bridges between villages in Nicaragua serve as links to markets
Yale Economic Growth Center researcher Kevin Donovan and coauthor find that building footbridges positively affects rural economies in flood-prone areas. (2020-11-30)

What does a crisis cost?
The Federal Institute for Risk Assessment (BfR) and Helmut Schmidt University/University of the Federal Armed Forces Hamburg (HSU/UniBwH) named their scientific research group, which focuses on the ''Costs of a crisis - analysis of the significance of non-events in consumer health protection'' ''Erika (Effective Risk Communication)''. (2020-11-27)

Implementing carbon pricing during the pandemic could help countries recover greener, smarter
As economies ''build back better,'' it may be an opportune time to introduce carbon pricing to tackle climate change, according to new Princeton University research. (2020-11-16)

How religion can hamper economic progress
Study from Bocconi University on impact of antiscientific curricula of Catholic schools on accumulation of human capital in France during the 2nd Industrial Revolution could hold lessons on impact of religion on technological progress today. (2020-11-13)

More economic worries mean less caution about COVID-19
Workers experiencing job and financial insecurity are less likely to follow the CDC's guidelines for COVID-19, such as physical distancing, limiting trips from home and washing hands, according to a Washington State University study. The researchers, who surveyed 745 workers in 43 states, also found that state unemployment benefits and COVID-19 policies affected the connection between economic concerns and compliance with COVID-19 precautions. (2020-11-09)

Female mongooses start battles for chance to mate
Female banded mongooses lead their groups into fights then try to mate with enemy males in the chaos of battle, new research shows. (2020-11-09)

Palm oil certification brings mixed outcomes to neighbouring communities
Research led by the University of Kent's Durrell Institute of Conservation and Ecology (DICE) has found that Indonesian communities living near oil palm plantations are impacted in different ways, both positive and negative, during plantation development and certification. (2020-11-02)

Living near green space linked to lower rates of smoking and higher chances of quitting
A study led by the University of Plymouth showed people living in areas with a high proportion of greenspace were 20% less likely to be current smokers than those in less green areas, and up to 12% more likely to have successfully quit smoking. (2020-10-30)

COVID-19 vaccine nationalism could cost world up to $1.2 trillion: New RAND Europe study
A huge global research effort is taking place to bring a fast-tracked COVID-19 vaccine to the market but there is concern that certain countries may prioritise their own population's access to any vaccines developed. New RAND Europe research shows that if some countries are unable to obtain vaccines owing to vaccine nationalism it could cost the global economy up to $1.2 trillion per year in GDP terms. (2020-10-28)

Fish banks
Society will require more food in the coming years to feed a growing population, and seafood will likely make up a significant portion of it. At the same time, we need to conserve natural habitats to ensure the health of our oceans. It seems like a conflict is inevitable. (2020-10-28)

Management of exploited transboundary fish stocks requires international cooperation
Marine fish species are migratory in nature and not respectful of human-made territorial boundaries, which represents a challenge for fisheries management as policies tend to focus at the national level. With an average catch of 48 million tonnes per year, and USD $77 billion in annual fishing revenue, these species support critical fisheries, and require international cooperation to manage. (2020-10-21)

Player behavior in the online game EVE Online may reflect real world country
Virtual worlds may reflect social and economic behavior in the real world, according to a study published October 21, 2020 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Andres M. Belaza and colleagues from Ghent University, Belgium. (2020-10-21)

National laboratories point to sugars as a key factor in ideal feedstock for biofuels
Popular wisdom holds that tall, fast-growing trees are best for biomass, but new research by two US Department of Energy National Laboratories reveals the size of trees is only part of the equation. Of equal economic importance, according to scientists from the US Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), is the amount of sugars that can be produced from the ligno-cellulosic biomass that can be converted into fuels. (2020-10-20)

Fraction of money earmarked for COVID-19 recovery could boost climate efforts
Global stimulus plans for economic recovery after the pandemic could easily cover climate-friendly policies, suggests new study. (2020-10-15)

Survey: More US Adults want the government to have a bigger role in improving peoples' lives than before the pandemic
The share of US adults who support an active government role in society increased by more than 40 percent during the initial pandemic response--up from 24 percent in September 2019 to 34 percent in April 2020. (2020-10-15)

Most nations failing to protect nature in COVID-19 pandemic recovery plans
The COVID-19 pandemic provides an opportunity to reset the global economy and reverse decades of ecosystem and species losses, but most countries are failing to invest in nature-related economic reforms or investments, according to a Rutgers-led paper. (2020-10-09)

Men less likely to see food as national security issue amid pandemic
On average, men not only showed less empathy toward temporary agricultural laborers but also were less likely to see food supply and production as national security issues, according to a study led by a Washington State University researcher. (2020-10-08)

Climate-friendly cooling to help ease global warming
A new IIASA-led study shows that coordinated international action on energy-efficient, climate-friendly cooling could avoid as much as 600 billion tonnes CO2 equivalent of greenhouse gas emissions in this century. (2020-10-06)

Women, workers of color filling most 'high-hazard/low-reward' jobs in Washington
When exploring data on Washington workers during the pandemic -- demographics, working conditions, wages and benefits, and risks of exposure to disease -- the authors of a new report found that women hold two-thirds of the jobs in the harshest category of work. (2020-10-05)

Subsidized cars help low-income families economically, socially
Nicholas Klein, assistant professor of city and regional planning at Cornell University, conducted interviews with 30 people who gained access to inexpensive, reliable cars through the nonprofit Vehicles for Change (VFC). (2020-10-02)

The development of climate security discourse in Japan
This research traced discourses related to climate security in Japan to determine why so little exists in Japan and whether or not such discourse could suggest new areas for consideration to more comprehensively respond to the climate change problem. Based on categorization of various approaches by climate security-related literature outside Japan, the study revealed areas where Japan has been able to respond to, and other areas where almost no discussion is being made in Japan. (2020-10-01)

Achieving clean air for all is possible
Air pollution is currently the largest environmental risk factor for human health globally and can be linked to several million cases of premature deaths every year. A new study however shows that it is possible to achieve clean air worldwide with fundamental transformations of today's practices in many sectors, supported by strong political will. (2020-09-29)

Inequalities in premature deaths have increased between the rich and poor in Canada
Socioeconomic inequalities in premature deaths in Canada have increased over the last 25 years, according to new research published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal) http://www.cmaj.ca/lookup/doi/10.1503/cmaj.191723. (2020-09-28)

Natural capital a missing piece in climate policy
Clean air, clean water and a functioning ecosystem are considered priceless. Yet accounting for the economic value of nature has large implications for climate policy, a UC Davis study shows. (2020-09-28)

Better conservation planning can improve human life too
Conservation planning can be greatly improved to benefit human communities, while still protecting biodiversity, according to University of Queensland research. PhD candidate Jaramar Villarreal-Rosas, from UQ's School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, said the benefits people receive from ecosystems - known as ecosystem services - are under increasing threat globally due to the negative impacts of human activities. (2020-09-22)

New method adds and subtracts for sustainability's true measure
Policies across the world seek clear paths to sustainability, but it takes a broad look to know their true impact. (2020-09-17)

The public charge rule: What physicians can do to support immigrant health
Physicians from the University of California, Irvine School of Medicine summarize current knowledge on the public benefits included in the 'public charge' rule and offer suggestions for family physicians to support the health of their immigrant patients and families. The authors conclude that 'family physicians can effectively respond to patient and immigrant community concerns about these changes by providing outreach education, access to primary health care, and referrals to legal and social services.' (2020-09-15)

Benefits likely outweigh costs for national monuments in the American west
New peer-reviewed research describes the history of the 1906 Antiquities Act (used to create national monuments), the controversies that have swirled around monument designation, and findings in the peer-reviewed literature about their impacts on surrounding communities. (2020-09-08)

Striving and stumbling towards sustainability amongst pandas and people
Understanding how achieving one of the 17 UN Sustainable Development Goals spins off more SDG success -- or sabotages progress on another goal across spatial and administrative boundaries. (2020-09-04)

Swedish workers among Europe's best-paid in late 1800s
In 19th-century Sweden, workers' wages rose faster than in other European countries. By 1900, they were among the highest in Europe, and the steepest rise of all had been for those who earned least. This is shown by new research at Uppsala University: a study published in The Journal of Economic History. (2020-09-01)

Social distancing is instinctive but hard for humans and animals
Human beings and animals will practice social distancing to avoid disease--to a point. But for humans, benefits such as ''global disease surveillance, rapid global communication and centralized governments with public health departments,'' may be wasted if we choose our social instincts over the evolutionary instinct that tells us to stay away from areas of potential infection. (2020-08-26)

Energy transition away from coal in China will yield benefits
China is the world's largest producer and consumer of coal. A team of international scientists led by Stony Brook University's Gang He, PhD, contend that China needs to transition away from coal to help the world achieve global decarbonization and improve the nation's environmental and human health. (2020-08-21)

Heating our climate damages our economies - study reveals greater costs than expected
Rising temperatures due to our greenhouse gas emissions can cause greater damages to our economies than previous research suggested, a new study shows. Scientists from the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK) and the Mercator Research Institute for Global Commons and Climate Change (MCC) took a closer look at what climate change does to regions at the sub-national level, such as US states, Chinese provinces or French départments, based on a first-of-its-kind dataset. (2020-08-19)

Decline in milk consumption by children in school lunch programs may affect future health
Fluid milk consumption among children is vital, as adequate consumption of dairy products, especially during childhood, has beneficial health outcomes later in life. These benefits include reduced risk of osteoporosis, hypertension, obesity, and cancer in adulthood. Milk consumption among children has been declining for decades, so understanding and fulfilling the needs of children is crucial to reverse the decline. In an article appearing in the Journal of Dairy Science, scientists studied key contributors to increasing milk consumption among children. (2020-08-18)

Scientists sound the alarm: Lockdowns may escalate the obesity epidemic
Emotional stress, economic anxiety, physical inactivity and social distance - locking down society to combat COVID-19 creates psychosocial insecurity that leads to obesity, warn three Danish researchers. Counter measures are needed if we are to keep the public both metabolically healthy and safe from the coronavirus (2020-08-13)

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