Current Economy News and Events

Current Economy News and Events, Economy News Articles.
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Climate change: Erratic weather slows down the economy
If temperature varies strongly from day to day, the economy grows less. Through these seemingly small variations climate change may have strong effects on economic growth. This shows data analyzed by researchers from the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK), Columbia University and the Mercator Research Institute on Global Commons and Climate Change (MCC). In a new study in Nature Climate Change, they juxtapose observed daily temperature changes with economic data from more than 1,500 regions worldwide over 40 years - with startling results. (2021-02-08)

Roadblocks to success for PhD grads could mean missed opportunities for Canada
Canada could be sitting on a significant untapped resource, as the number of PhD holders in this country rises, but persistent barriers make it hard for them to put their skills to work. According to a new expert panel report from the Council of Canadian Academies (CCA), PhD graduates play a critical role in the Canadian economy, but many are missing out on important opportunities to contribute their expertise and bolster growth and innovation. (2021-01-26)

Lack of managers keeps India's businesses small
In today's economy, American businesses often tap into professional management to grow, but most firms in India and other developing countries are family owned and often shun outside managers. A new study co-authored by Yale economist Michael Peters explores the effects that the absence of outside professional management has on India's businesses and the country's economy. (2021-01-14)

'Ocean 100': Small group of companies dominate ocean economy
Dubbed the 'Ocean 100', the group of companies generated US$1.1 trillion in revenues in 2018, according to the research published in the journal Science Advances. (2021-01-13)

'Ocean 100': Small group of companies dominates ocean economy
Most of the revenues extracted from use of the world's oceans is concentrated among 100 transnational corporations. Dubbed the ''Ocean 100'' by researchers at Duke University and Stockholm University, these ''blue economy'' companies collectively generated $1.1 trillion in revenues in 2018, according to research published Wednesday in the journal Science Advances. If the group were a country, it would have the world's 16th-largest economy, roughly equivalent to the gross domestic product (GDP) of Mexico. (2021-01-13)

Story tips: Nanoscale commuting, easy driver and defect detection
ORNL story tips: Nanoscale commuting, easy driver and defect detection. (2021-01-05)

Modeling can help balance economy, health during pandemic
Using mathematical modeling, new interdisciplinary research from the lab of Arye Nehorai, the Eugene & Martha Lohman Professor of Electrical Engineering in the Preston M. Green Department of Electrical & Systems Engineering at Washington University in St. Louis, determines the best course of action when it comes to walking the line between economic stability and the best possible health outcomes. (2020-12-24)

Pandemic and forthcoming stimulus funds could bring climate targets in sight -- or not
The lockdowns that resulted from the COVID-19 pandemic have reduced greenhouse gas emissions. However, in the recovery phase, emissions could rise to levels above those projected before the pandemic. It all depends on how the stimulus money that governments inject into their economies is spent. A team of scientists, led by Dr. Yuli Shan and Professor Klaus Hubacek, University of Groningen, has quantified how different recovery scenarios may affect global emissions and climate change. (2020-12-22)

Frequent, fast, accessible testing should be public health tool during COVID-19 pandemic
In a perspective piece published in Science, Brigham and Women's Hospital's Michael Mina, MD, PhD, and his co-author, Kristian G. Andersen, PhD, describe the power of public health screening, which focuses on mitigating transmission of the virus at the population level, and how it may be a crucial and overlooked tool. (2020-12-21)

NYS can achieve 2050 carbon goals: Here's how
By delving into scientific, technological, environmental and economic data, Cornell University engineering researchers examined whether New York could achieve a statewide carbon-free economy by 2050. Their finding: Yes, New York can reach this goal - and do it with five years to spare. (2020-12-18)

Towards circular economy: European manufacturers tend not to report on their actions
After analysing the data from 226 large manufacturing companies from the European Union, a team of researchers from Lithuania, Poland and Sweden have drawn a conclusion that organisations almost do not mention circular economy principles in their environmental reporting. In their reports, the organisations mostly refer to the effective use of primary flows and minimising waste. (2020-12-16)

The role of platform protection insurance in the sharing economy
PPI significantly increases buyer spending and seller revenues, affirming the benefits of this service in the sharing economy. (2020-12-10)

COVID-19 lockdown causes unprecedented drop in global CO2 emissions in 2020
The global COVID-19 lockdowns caused fossil carbon dioxide emissions to decline by an estimated 2.4 billion tonnes in 2020 - a record drop according to researchers at Future Earth's Global Carbon Project. This and other findings are now available in the newly released Global Carbon Budget 2020. (2020-12-10)

Health Affairs: Reprocessing single-use med devices boosts circular economy for hospitals
Regulated medical device reprocessing is an important tool in improving environmental and public health outcomes, according to a new analysis published in Health Affairs. The paper indicates that health care systems generate significant amounts of air pollution and greenhouse gas emissions, the majority of which come from the supply chain. Hospitals that have medical devices reprocessed by regulated reprocessors removed over 7,100 tons of waste, a number that could grow dramatically, according to the researchers. (2020-12-07)

Cereal, olive and vine pollen reveal market integration in Ancient Greece
By analyzing sediment cores taken from six sites in southern Greece, an international team of researchers identified trends in cereal, olive, and vine pollen indicating structural changes in agricultural production between 1000 BCE and 600 CE. In a study published The Economic Journal, the researchers combine varying fields of scientific research to provide evidence for a market economy in ancient Greece characterized by integrated agricultural production and a major expansion of trade (2020-11-27)

You drive like a girl: Study shows gender bias in perceptions of ride-sharing performance
While digital brokerages provide a more efficient method for the exchange of goods and services and an improved way for consumers to voice their opinions about the quality of work they receive, bias and discrimination can emerge as part of the review process, according to Notre Dame research. (2020-11-09)

Resistance and challenges to Green Deals should not be underestimated
A Perspective by the EASAC Environment Steering Panel (2020-10-29)

Study tracks public concerns on Twitter about COVID-19
Twitter users initially didn't feel positive about the state of the economy, prevention, treatment and recovery concerning COVID-19. That changed by the end of March 2020. In contrast, throughout the period examined from January to May 2020, the public, in general, felt negative about the way the pandemic had been handled by political leadership. (2020-10-28)

Researcher found female candidates are more likely to discuss the economy than males
In a new study published in Politics & Policy, Deserai Crow, PhD, associate professor at the University of Colorado Denver in the School of Public Affairs, found significant differences in discussion topics between both party affiliation and gender. Narratives from both Republican and Democratic candidates in 48 U.S. House campaigns from the 2018 midterm election were analyzed in this study. (2020-10-26)

The BrainHealth project could create a resilient economy
Scientists at Center for BrainHealth® worked with researchers across the world to develop a science-based plan that could help the economy recover and prevent similar collapses in the future. The Brain Capital Grand Strategy is an economic reimagination wherein organizations invest in employees' brain health as a critical, measurable asset. Improving brain health helps people tap into their brain's limitless potential, catalyze innovative thinking and improve their productivity, in turn strengthening the transforming economy. (2020-10-26)

CCS can rapidly reduce emissions in sectors that have few other options to decarbonize, EFI/Stanford
The Energy Futures Initiative (EFI) and Stanford University released ''An Action Plan for Carbon Capture and Storage in California: Opportunities, Challenges, and Solutions,'' a report providing policymakers with options for near-term actions to deploy carbon capture and storage (CCS) to meet the state's climate goals. (2020-10-22)

Artificial cyanobacterial biofilm can sustain green ethylene production for over a month
Ethylene is one of the most important and widely used organic chemicals. The research group at the University of Turku led by Associate Professor Yagut Allahverdiyeva-Rinne has designed a thin-layer artificial biofilm with embedded cyanobacterial cell factories which were specifically engineered for photosynthetic production of ''green'' ethylene. The fabricated biofilms have sustained ethylene production for up to 40 days. (2020-10-15)

Fraction of money earmarked for COVID-19 recovery could boost climate efforts
Global stimulus plans for economic recovery after the pandemic could easily cover climate-friendly policies, suggests new study. (2020-10-15)

A circular economy could save the world's economy post-COVID-19
The World's economy is feeling the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic with many industries under threat. A group of researchers from the UK, Malaysia, Nigeria, UAE and Japan, led by WMG, University of Warwick have concluded that adopting circular economy strategies would be the best way for the world's economy to recover, whilst enabling the transition to a low-carbon economy. (2020-10-12)

Crabs are key to ecology and economy in Oman
The intertidal mudflats of Barr Al Hikman, a nature reserve at the south-east coast of the Sultanate Oman, are crucial nursery grounds for numerous crab species. In return, crabs are a vital element of the ecology, as well as the regional economy, a new publication in Hydrobiologia shows. 'These important functions of the crabs should be considered when looking at the increasing human pressure on this nature reserve', first author and NIOZ-researcher Roeland Bom says. (2020-10-08)

CRISPRing trees for a climate-friendly economy
Researchers led by prof. Wout Boerjan (VIB-UGent Center for Plant Systems Biology) have discovered a way to stably finetune the amount of lignin in poplar by applying CRISPR/Cas9 technology. Lignin is one of the main structural substances in plants and it makes processing wood into, for example, paper difficult. (2020-10-06)

Natural capital a missing piece in climate policy
Clean air, clean water and a functioning ecosystem are considered priceless. Yet accounting for the economic value of nature has large implications for climate policy, a UC Davis study shows. (2020-09-28)

Nature conservation and tourism can coexist despite conflicts
The concept of sustainable nature tourism plays a key role in mediating conflicts between tourism and nature conservation, a new study from the University of Eastern Finland shows. (2020-09-21)

Bolsonaro's Indigenous land mining policy a billion-dollar backfire
Research has found a proposal to regulate mining of Indigenous lands in Brazil's Amazon rainforest could affect more than 863,000 square kilometres of forest and harm the nation's economy. (2020-09-18)

Ecologists sound alarm on plastic pollution
Research led by ecologists at the University of Toronto examining plastic pollution entering oceans, rivers and lakes around the world annually, outlines potential impacts of various mitigation strategies over the coming decade. The researchers estimate the scale of human response needed to reduce future emissions and manage what's already floating around out there and recommend a fundamental shift to a framework based on recycling where end-of-life plastic products are valued rather than becoming waste. (2020-09-17)

Comprehensive look at US fuel economy standards show big savings on fuel and emissions
In one of the first comprehensive assessments of the fuel economy standards in the US, researchers found that, over their 40-year history, the standards helped reduce reliance on foreign oil producers, saved $5 trillion in fuel costs and prevented 14 billion metric tons of carbon from being released into the atmosphere. The standards (known as CAFE standards), first enacted to reduce foreign oil dependence, were cost-effective, fair, durable and adaptive, the researchers found. (2020-09-03)

Dealing a blow on monetarism
This year's third issue of the Financial Journal opens with an article by Marina Malkina, Professor at the Department of Economic Theory and Methodology of the UNN Institute of Economics and Entrepreneurship, and Igor Moiseev, research assistant at the Center for Macroeconomics and Microeconomics of the same Institute. Their article entitled ''Endogeneity of Money Supply in the Russian Economy in the Context of the Monetary Regime Change'' is published in the ''Monetary policy'' section. (2020-08-27)

Our energy hunger is tethered to our economic past
Current world energy consumption is tied to unchangeable past economic production. And the way out of an ever-increasing rate of carbon emissions may not necessarily be ever-increasing energy efficiency--in fact it may be the opposite. (2020-08-27)

Unconventional monetary policy and bank risk taking
Unconventional monetary policy does not lead to greater risk-taking by banks, according to new research. This will be welcome news for policymakers and central banks as they ramp up efforts to limit the economic fallout of the pandemic. (2020-08-19)

How creating an "empathy lens" makes P2P marketing communications more effective
Provider-focused P2P marketing communications increase consumers' likelihood of purchase, app download, and willingness to pay. (2020-08-01)

A rebranding of 'freedom'?
According to recent Gallup polls, socialism is now more popular than capitalism among Democrats and young people, and support for ''some form of socialism'' among all Americans is at 43% (compared to 25% in 1942). Policies that went unmentioned or were declared out-of-bounds in elections four years ago -- a federal jobs guarantee, single-payer health care, free college, massive tax hikes on the rich, and the Green New Deal--are commonplace in Democrats' 2020 campaigns. (2020-07-31)

How to mix old tires and building rubble to make sustainable roads
A recycled blend developed by Australian researchers brings together construction and tyre waste, to deliver both environmental and engineering benefits. The material offers a zero-waste solution to a massive environmental challenge - construction, renovation and demolition account for about 50% of the waste produced annually worldwide, while around 1 billion scrap tyres are generated globally each year. (2020-07-29)

NZ-China agreement has brought strong economic gains, Otago research
An Otago economist argues New Zealand should expand its trade agreements in the wake of COVID-19, as his new research shows the country benefited from the NZ-China free trade agreement. University of Otago Economics Lecturer Dr Murat Ungor and his former Masters student, Sam Verevis collaborated on the paper What has New Zealand gained from the FTA with China: Two counterfactual analyses, which has just been published in the Scottish Journal of Political Economy. (2020-07-28)

Humans need to do better if we're to avoid ocean system collapse
A new relationship between humanity and the ocean is required to secure the continuity of the diverse life support roles provided by the sea, according to a paper published in Nature Communications on 17 July 2020. Titled 'A transition to sustainable ocean governance,' it describes three key transition pathways that can make complex ocean systems more resilient and ensure a more sustainable future. (2020-07-19)

NREL research points to strategies for recycling of solar panels
Researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) have conducted the first global assessment into the most promising approaches to end-of-life management for solar photovoltaic (PV) modules. (2020-07-14)

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