Current Ecstasy News and Events

Current Ecstasy News and Events, Ecstasy News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Viewed
Page 1 of 5 | 175 Results
Sewage study shows which countries like to party hard
The Netherlands, United States, Australia and New Zealand are consuming the highest amounts of designer 'party' drugs, according to wastewater samples taken from eight countries over the New Year period. (2021-02-21)

Clubs closed? Study finds partygoers turn to virtual raves and happy hours during pandemic
People have traded in nightclubs and dance festivals for virtual raves and Zoom happy hours as a result of lockdowns during the COVID-19 pandemic--yet, many are using drugs in these socially distanced settings, according to a new study by researchers at NYU Grossman School of Medicine and the Center for Drug Use and HIV/HCV Research at NYU School of Global Public Health. (2020-08-26)

Researchers flush out worrying trend of designer drug use
In a sign that designer drugs are becoming more prevalent in Australia, synthetic cathinones -- commonly known as 'bath salts' -- have been detected in the nation's wastewater in the largest study of its kind in the country. (2020-06-15)

Study shows rising age of first drug use in teens, young adults
The average age at which teens and young adults start using drugs has been rising, according to a study published in JAMA Pediatrics. The study examined changes in the average age of first drug use for 18 different drugs--including alcohol and tobacco products--between 2004 and 2017 and found that average ages had increased for the majority of those drugs. (2020-03-02)

Ketamine use is underreported -- likely due to unknown exposure -- among EDM partygoers
Nearly 37% of electronic dance music (EDM) party attendees test positive for ketamine use when samples of their hair are tested -- despite only 14.6% disclosing that they have used the drug in the past year. (2020-01-30)

Psychedelic drugs could help treat PTSD
Clinical trials suggest treatment that involves psychedelics can be more effective than psychotherapy alone. More than three million people in the United States are diagnosed each year with post-traumatic stress disorder, whose symptoms include nightmares or unwanted memories of trauma, heightened reactions, anxieties, and depression--and can last months, or even years. (2020-01-17)

Drug overdose deaths in CT doubled in 6 years
Opioid overdose deaths in Connecticut doubled in the past 6 years, largely driven by use of multiple drugs together, according to a team of researchers from the University of Connecticut and Yale University. (2019-10-29)

Mapping international drug use through the world's largest wastewater study
A seven-year project monitoring illicit drug use in 37 countries via wastewater samples shows that cocaine use was skyrocketing in Europe in 2017 and Australia had a serious problem with methamphetamine. (2019-10-23)

Mapping international drug use by looking at wastewater
Wastewater-based epidemiology is a rapidly developing scientific discipline with the potential for monitoring close to real-time, population-level trends in illicit drug use. The results of the international monitoring campaigns performed annually over seven years (2011-2017) by an international group of scientists, the SCORE group (Sewage analysis CORe group Europe), are now compiled in an article published in the prestigious journal Addiction. (2019-10-23)

Electronic dance music party-goers at increased risk for drug-related emergencies
People who frequent electronic dance music (EDM) parties often use multiple drugs simultaneously and experience adverse effects with some ending up in the emergency department, say researchers at New York University School of Medicine and Rutgers University. (2019-08-21)

Nearly 1 in 2 swingers uses recreational drugs to intensify sex, survey suggests
Nearly one in two swingers uses recreational drugs to intensify the experience, with women more likely to do so than either straight or bisexual men, suggest the results of a Dutch survey, published online in the journal Sexually Transmitted Infections. (2019-08-12)

People are more likely to try drugs for the first time during the summer
American teenagers and adults are more likely to try illegal or recreational drugs for the first time in the summer, a new study shows. (2019-07-23)

Does stimulation of the brain's dorsal anterior insula trigger ecstasy?
The epileptic 'aura' is a subjective phenomenon that sometimes precedes the visible clinical features of a seizure. Investigators tested three epileptic patients prior to potential surgery to try to determine where their seizures originate. They observed that these patients reported an ecstatic aura only when the dorsal anterior insula of the brain was stimulated. Their findings in the journal Brain Stimulation, published by Elsevier, provide additional support of a major role played by the dorsal anterior insula in ecstatic experiences. (2019-06-24)

Strobe lighting at dance music festivals linked to tripling in epileptic fit risk
Strobe lighting at electronic dance music festivals may be linked to a tripling in the risk of epileptic fits in susceptible individuals, suggests research published in the online journal BMJ Open. (2019-06-11)

A $12 pill test could save the lives of first-timers
Pill testing services at music festivals may be most effective in reducing harm for people trying ecstasy for the first time, but less so for prior users. (2019-06-10)

'Ecstasy' shows promise for post-traumatic stress treatment
An international study involving researchers from UBC Okanagan has shown that MDMA, also known as ecstasy, may be a valuable tool for treating post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Published recently in Psychopharmacology, the study demonstrated substantial improvements in individuals who had not responded to prior treatments, explains UBCO Associate Professor of psychology Zach Walsh. This is also, he adds, the most comprehensive evaluation of the safety and effectiveness of MDMA-assisted psychotherapy for PTSD. (2019-05-29)

MDMA users more empathetic than other drug users
Long-term MDMA users have higher levels of empathy than cannabis and other drugs users, new research suggests. (2019-02-08)

How catnip makes the chemical that causes cats to go crazy
Researchers at John Innes Centre have shed light on how catnip -- also known as catmint -- produces the chemical that sends cats into a state of wanton abandon. (2018-12-10)

Ecstasy ingredient may promote cooperation
The recreational drug known as ecstasy or molly may help people regain trust in others after being betrayed, suggests results of a controlled laboratory study, published in JNeurosci, of healthy men given a pure form of the substance. The drug is currently being assessed for its potential as a supplemental treatment for post-traumatic stress disorder. (2018-11-19)

MDMA makes people cooperative, but not gullible
New research from King's College London has found that MDMA, the main ingredient in ecstasy, causes people to cooperate better -- but only with trustworthy people. In the first study to look in detail at how MDMA impacts cooperative behavior the researchers also identified changes to activity in brain regions linked to social processing. (2018-11-19)

MDMA (a.k.a. ecstasy) makes octopuses more social too
When people take MDMA, the drug popularly known as ecstasy, a rush of serotonin, dopamine, and oxytocin produces feelings of emotional closeness and euphoria, making people more interested than normal in connecting with other people. Now, researchers reporting in Current Biology on Sept. 20 have made the surprising discovery that a species of octopus considered to be primarily solitary and asocial responds to MDMA similarly: by becoming much more interested in engaging with one other. (2018-09-20)

Octopuses given mood drug 'ecstasy' reveal genetic link to evolution of social behaviors in humans
By studying the genome of a kind of octopus not known for its friendliness toward its peers, then testing its behavioral reaction to a popular mood-altering drug called MDMA or 'ecstasy,' scientists say they have found preliminary evidence of an evolutionary link between the social behaviors of the sea creature and humans, species separated by 500 million years on the evolutionary tree. (2018-09-20)

LGBQ teens more likely than peers to use dangerous drugs
Lesbian, gay, bisexual or questioning (LGBQ) teens are at substantially higher risk of substance use than their heterosexual peers, according to a new study led by San Diego State University researchers and published in the American Journal of Public Health. (2018-07-12)

Tiny probe can see and take body temperatures
University of Adelaide researchers have invented a world-first tiny fiber-optic probe that can simultaneously measure temperature and see deep inside the body. The probe may help researchers find better treatments to prevent drug-induced overheating of the brain, and potentially refine thermal treatment for cancers. (2018-04-12)

Hip-hop music influencing more African-Americans to try 'Molly'
'Molly' is growing in popularity within the African-American community. New research shows much of that has to do with rap lyrics. (2018-02-12)

Young adults report differing sexual effects from alcohol, marijuana, and ecstasy
Alcohol, marijuana, and ecstasy each have very different sexual effects, from attraction and desire to sensitivity to sexual dysfunction, finds a study by the Center for Drug Use and HIV/HCV Research (CDUHR) at NYU Meyers College of Nursing. (2018-01-10)

Cell phone data coupled with sewage testing show drug use patterns
The drugs people inhale, inject or ingest ultimately end up in some form down the toilet. So scientists have started monitoring drug use through sewage-based epidemiology. But this approach hasn't taken into account the variation in number of people who add to wastewater in a given area at a given time. Now one team reports in ACS' Environmental Science & Technology a way to account for commutes and vacations: by tracking cell phone signals. (2017-09-20)

Unintentional drug use continues among molly users in EDM party scene
Use of MDMA or 'Molly' is common in the electronic dance music scene, but research is showing that many Molly users are using other drugs unknowingly. (2017-09-13)

Chapman University Publishes research on substance use among transgender students in California
Chapman University has published research on substance abuse among transgender students in California. The research looked at students in middle and high schools in nearly every school district in California. Results showed transgender adolescents were more than two times more likely to engage in substance use in their lifetimes. The paper appears in the Journal of School Health. (2017-08-15)

On-site ecstasy pill-testing services may reduce user risks at concerts and raves
Johns Hopkins scientists report that data collected over five years by volunteers who tested pills free of charge at music festivals and raves across the United States suggest that at least some recreational users of illegal drugs may choose not to take them if tests show the pills are adulterated or fake. (2017-07-10)

How to accurately assess use of new psychoactive drugs such as 'bath salts'
Researchers surveyed individuals entering NYC EDM parties about their drug usage, with almost one out of ten participants who reported no 'bath salt' use as per the gate question then reported use of one or more drugs in this class, such as methylone, providing evidence of under-reporting. (2017-05-16)

New way to detect ecstasy discovered
While building molecular machines, researchers stumbled upon a new method to detect ecstasy. The discovery can lead to more reliable drug tests. (2017-05-08)

Hair testing shows high prevalence of new psychoactive substance use
In the study, hair samples from 80 young adults outside of NYC nightclubs and dance festivals, were tested for 82 drugs and metabolites (including NPS) using ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. (2017-03-31)

Recreational amphetamine use may hasten biological aging of the heart
The use of recreational amphetamine, popularly known as 'speed,' 'ice,' and 'ecstasy,' may hasten the biological ageing of the heart, suggests research, published in the online journal Heart Asia. (2017-02-09)

CHEST 2016 Annual Meeting case reports: More reasons to say no to drugs
Case studies being presented at the CHEST Annual Meeting 2016 in Los Angeles that give reasons not to do drugs. (2016-10-17)

Why scientists are calling for experiments on ecstasy
MDMA, more commonly known as ecstasy, promotes strong feelings of empathy in users and is classified as a Schedule 1 drug -- a category reserved for compounds with no accepted medical use and a high abuse potential. But in a Commentary published July 14 in Cell, two researchers call for a rigorous scientific exploration of MDMA's effects to identify precisely how the drug works, the data from which could be used to develop therapeutic compounds. (2016-07-14)

NYU research: The struggle to maintain accurate data on the prevalence of opioid abuse
A new study describes the differences in self-reporting of nonmedical opioid use among high school seniors. The results underscore that medical and law enforcement communities may be underestimating opioid use and not just among younger populations. (2016-06-22)

Rolling on Molly: US H.S. seniors underreport ecstasy use when not asked about Molly
A new study, published in Drug and Alcohol Dependence by researchers affiliated with NYU CDUHR, compared self-reported ecstasy/MDMA use with and without 'Molly' in the definition. Researchers found that reported lifetime use (8.0 percent vs. 5.5 percent) was significantly higher with Molly in the definition. (2016-06-13)

New discovery from the molecular machinery for depression and addiction
Researchers at Aarhus University have described how a group of the brain's transport proteins with important roles in depression and dependence overcome the step which limits their effectiveness. The discovery makes it possible to describe the full function of the transport protein and can provide better opportunities for counteracting the effect of amphetamine and ecstasy on the brain. (2016-05-26)

UBC study finds psychedelic drugs may reduce domestic violence
Psychedelic drugs may help curb domestic violence committed by men with substance abuse problems, according to a new UBC study. The UBC Okanagan study found that 42 percent of US adult male inmates who did not take psychedelic drugs were arrested within six years for domestic battery after their release, compared to a rate of 27 percent for those who had taken drugs such as LSD, psilocybin (commonly known as magic mushrooms) and MDMA (ecstasy). (2016-04-26)

Page 1 of 5 | 175 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.