Current Elastic Fibers News and Events

Current Elastic Fibers News and Events, Elastic Fibers News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Viewed
Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
Researchers grow artificial hairs with clever physics trick
Things just got hairy at Princeton. Researchers found they could coat a liquid elastic on the outside of a disc and spin it to form useful, complex patterns. When spun just right, tiny spindles rise from the material as it cures. The spindles grow as the disc accelerates, forming a soft solid that resembles hairs. Published in PNAS Feb. 22 (2021-02-22)

People with this muscle protein gene variant tolerate the cold better
A gene variant that affects muscle function may have protected humans against cold during migrations from Africa to Europe more than 50,000 years ago, suggests a study appearing February 17 in the American Journal of Human Genetics. Researchers show that deficiency of a protein called ╬▒-actinin-3 caused by a gene variant improves cold tolerance in humans by increasing muscle tone. (2021-02-17)

Application of potassium to grass used as cover crop guarantees higher-quality cotton
In an article, Brazilian researchers show that besides simplifying operational logistics and improving production, fertilization of the grass used as a cover crop can reduce fertilizer use in the long run. (2021-02-16)

'Handy pen' lights up when exposed to nerve gas or spoiled food vapors
Exposure to some odorless, colorless and tasteless gases, such as nerve agents, can be toxic or even lethal. And having the ability to detect other types of vapors could save people from eating spoiled or rotten food. Easy-to-use portable devices could, therefore, go a long way toward protecting the public. Now researchers reporting in ACS Materials Letters have created a pen-like sensor that changes color when exposed to harmful gases. (2021-02-10)

Silicon anode structure generates new potential for lithium-ion batteries
New research has identified a nanostructure that improves the anode in lithium-ion batteries. Instead of using graphite for the anode, the researchers turned to silicon: a material that stores more charge but is susceptible to fracturing. The team deposited silicon atoms on top of metallic nanoparticles to form an arched nanostructure, increasing the strength and structural integrity of the anode. Electrochemical tests showed the batteries had a higher charge capacity and longer lifespan. (2021-02-05)

Molecule from nature provides fully recyclable polymers
Plastics are among the most successful materials of modern times. However, they also create a huge waste problem. Scientists from the University of Groningen and the East China University of Science and Technology (ECUST) in Shanghai produced different polymers from lipoic acid, a natural molecule. These polymers are easily depolymerized under mild conditions. Some 87 percent of the monomers can be recovered in their pure form and re-used to make new polymers of virgin quality. (2021-02-04)

3D-printed bioresorbable airway stent
An ETH Zurich research team is using 3D printing to produce a new type of bioresorbable airway stent. This could greatly simplify the future treatment of upper airway obstruction. (2021-02-03)

Highly deformable piezoelectric nanotruss for tactile electronics
A KAIST research team confirmed the potential of tactile devices by developing ceramic piezoelectric materials that are three times more deformable. For the fabrication of highly deformable nanomaterials, the research team built a zinc oxide hollow nanostructure using proximity field nanopatterning and atomic layered deposition. (2021-02-01)

Microstructured optical fibers find their 3D-printed groove
Advanced laser-printing techniques prove ideal for creating tiny optical communication devices with complex internal structures. (2021-01-25)

With new design, stretchable electronics perform better under strain
Researchers have created stretchable electronics that are less compromised by deformation. They also created several circuit elements with the design, which could lead to even more types of stretchable electronics. (2021-01-25)

A microscopic look at aneurysm repair
Research from the University of Pittsburgh and the Mayo Clinic, published in Experimental Mechanics, is the first to show that there are two phases of wall restructuring after an aneurysm forms, the first beginning right away to reinforce the weakened points. (2021-01-25)

Researchers develop new graphene nanochannel water filters
Brown University researchers have shown that tiny channels between graphene sheets can be aligned in a way that makes them ideal for water filtration. (2021-01-21)

Innovations through hair-thin optical fibres
Scientists at the University of Bonn have built hair-thin optical fibre filters in a very simple way. They are not only extremely compact and stable, but also colour-tunable. This means they can be used in quantum technology and as sensors for temperature or for detecting atmospheric gases. The results have been published in the journal ''Optics Express''. (2021-01-20)

A little friction goes a long way toward stronger nanotube fibers
Carbon nanotube fibers are not nearly as strong as the nanotubes they contain, but Rice University researchers are working to close the gap with a computational model that shows nanotube length and the friction between them are equal contributors. (2021-01-19)

Latch, load and release: Elastic motion makes click beetles click, study finds
Click beetles can propel themselves more than 20 body lengths into the air, and they do so without using their legs. While the jump's motion has been studied in depth, the physical mechanisms that enable the beetles' signature clicking maneuver have not. A new study examines the forces behind this super-fast energy release and provides guidelines for studying extreme motion, energy storage and energy release in other small animals like trap-jaw ants and mantis shrimps. (2021-01-18)

Designer cytokine makes paralyzed mice walk again
To date, paralysis resulting from spinal cord damage has been irreparable. With a new therapeutic approach, scientists from the Department for Cell Physiology at Ruhr-Universit├Ąt Bochum (RUB) headed by Professor Dietmar Fischer have succeeded for the first time in getting paralyzed mice to walk again. The keys to this are the protein hyper-interleukin-6, which stimulates nerve cells to regenerate, and the way how it is supplied to the animals. (2021-01-15)

T cells linked to myelin implicated in MS-like disease in monkeys
Scientists have uncovered new clues implicating a type of herpes virus as the cause of a central nervous system disease in monkeys that's similar to multiple sclerosis in people. By linking two specific T cells to the loss of myelin, scientists say the new study opens the possibility of developing an antiviral therapy that could be especially useful for newly diagnosed cases of multiple sclerosis. (2021-01-15)

Bio-inspired spiral hydrogel fiber qualified to be surgical suture
A team led by Prof. YU Shuhong from the University of Science and Technology of China reported a bio-inspired lotus-fiber-mimetic spiral structure BC hydrogel fiber with high strength, high toughness, excellent biocompatibility, good stretchability, and high energy dissipation. (2021-01-14)

Study suggests compound protects myelin, nerve fibers
A compound developed at Oregon Health & Science University appears to protect nerve fibers and the fatty sheath, called myelin, that covers nerve cells in the brain and spinal cord. The new research in a mouse model advances earlier work to develop the compound - known as sobetirome - that has already showed promise in stimulating the repair of myelin. (2021-01-13)

Researchers identify promising model for studying human aging
The research team plans to study how the changes observed in animal models mimic the deterioration of muscle function in aging humans. (2021-01-13)

New technology reveals fast and slow twitch muscle fibers respond differently to exercise
Scientists at the University of Copenhagen have performed the most in-depth analysis of fast and slow twitch muscle fibers and the different ways they respond to exercise. Their novel approach uses large scale protein analysis of freeze-dried muscle samples, which opens the door for new analyses of muscle samples that are located in freezers around the world. (2021-01-12)

Analytical measurements can predict organic solar cell stability
researchers have developed an analytical measurement ''framework'' which could allow organic solar cell researchers and manufacturers to determine which materials will produce the most stable solar cells prior to manufacture. (2021-01-11)

Researchers repurpose 'damaged' polymer optical fibers to precisely measure magnetic fields
Optical fiber sensors can measure strain, temperature, pressure, and many other physical parameters along the fibers, but they are currently immune to electromagnetic noise -- interference from other external electric or magnetic interactions. It is a desirable trait, until the effect of the electromagnetic field on the fibers needs to be measured. An international research team has used what was previously considered a 'damaged' part of an optical fiber to develop such a magnetic field sensor. (2021-01-07)

Treating an autoimmune disease in mice with an mRNA vaccine
Christina Krienke and colleagues have designed an mRNA vaccine that delayed the onset of and reduced the severity of multiple sclerosis-like disease in mice. (2021-01-07)

The world's first integrated quantum communication network
Chinese scientists have established the world's first integrated quantum communication network, combining over 700 optical fibers on the ground with two ground-to-satellite links to achieve quantum key distribution over a total distance of 4,600 kilometers for users across the country. (2021-01-06)

Mighty morphing 3D printing
Engineers at the University of Maryland have created a new shape-changing or ''morphing'' 3D printing nozzle, which offers researchers new means for 3D printing ''fiber-filled composites.'' (2021-01-06)

Wait for me: Cell biologists decipher signal that ensures no chromosome is left behind
UC San Diego cell biologists have found a key clue in the mystery of how chromosomes are inherited correctly every time a cell divides. Using a novel cell probe, they unraveled how a 'matchmaker' molecule stops cell division until components are ready to be split. Precise chromosome duplication is a key factor in proper cell division. If components are altered, even slightly, birth defects and certain cancers can result. (2021-01-06)

Gas pressure depletion and seismicity
Europe's largest gas field, the Groningen field in the Netherlands, is widely known for induced subsidence and seismicity caused by gas pressure depletion and associated compaction of the sandstone reservoir. Whether compaction is elastic or partly inelastic, as implied by recent experiments, is key to forecasting system behavior and seismic hazard. (2021-01-04)

Microfabricated elastic diamonds improve material's electronic properties
Overcoming a key obstacle in achieving diamond-based electronic and optoelectronic devices, researchers have presented a new way to fabricate micrometer-sized diamonds that can elastically stretch. (2020-12-31)

Stretching diamond for next-generation microelectronics
Diamond is the hardest material in nature. But out of many expectations, it also has great potential as an excellent electronic material. A joint research team led by City University of Hong Kong (CityU) has demonstrated for the first time the large, uniform tensile elastic straining of microfabricated diamond arrays through the nanomechanical approach. Their findings have shown the potential of strained diamonds as prime candidates for advanced functional devices in microelectronics, photonics, and quantum information technologies. (2020-12-31)

Eavesdropping on the pH levels inside the brain
Researchers at Tohoku University have developed the first all-in-one miniature pH probe for real-time investigations of intrinsic extracellular pH dynamics in the deep brain structures. (2020-12-23)

Putting on the pressure improves glass for fiber optics
Rapid, accurate communication worldwide is possible via fiber optic cables, but as good as they are, they are not perfect. Now, researchers from Penn State and AGC Inc. in Japan suggest that the silica glass used for these cables would have less signal loss if it were manufactured under high pressure. (2020-12-22)

New optical fiber brings significant improvements to light-based gyroscopes
Researchers have taken an important new step in advancing the performance of resonator fiber optic gyroscopes, a type of fiber optic sensor that senses rotation using only light. Because gyroscopes are the basis of most navigation systems, the new work could one day bring important improvements to these systems. (2020-12-21)

Digging deep for differences in Duchenne muscular dystrophy
A UT Southwestern research team has catalogued gene activity in the skeletal muscle of mice, comparing healthy animals to those carrying a genetic mutation that causes Duchene muscular dystrophy (DMD) in humans. The findings, published online recently in PNAS, could lead to new treatments for this devastating degenerative disease and insights into factors that affect muscle development. (2020-12-21)

Machine intelligence accelerates research into mapping brains
Scientists in Japan's brain science project have used machine intelligence to improve the accuracy and reliability of a powerful brain-mapping technique, a new study reports. Their development, published on December 18th in Scientific Reports, gives researchers more confidence in using the technique to untangle the human brain's wiring and to better understand the changes in this wiring that accompany neurological or mental disorders such as Parkinson's or Alzheimer's disease. (2020-12-18)

World's first transmission of 1 Petabit/s using a single-core multimode optical fiber
A group of researchers from the National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT, Japan) and NOKIA Bell Labs (USA) and Prysimian Group (France) succeeded in the world's first transmission exceeding 1 petabit per second in a single-core multi-mode optical fiber. This increases the current record transmission in a multi-mode fiber by a factor of 2.5. The wideband optical transmission was enabled by mode multiplexers and a transmission fiber optimized for high optical bandwidth. (2020-12-18)

Pulp succeeded in diet? Determining the slenderization of wood pulp
Osaka University scientists devise a system for measuring the quality of nanofibrillation for wood pulp using its natural optical birefringence. This work may lead to clear definition and sophisticated utilization of wooden cellulose nanofibers. (2020-12-17)

Muscle cell secrets
A muscle fiber consists of just one cell, but many nuclei. A team at the MDC led by Professor Carmen Birchmeier has now shown just how varied these nuclei are. The study, which has been published in Nature Communications, can help us better understand muscle diseases such as Duchenne muscular dystrophy. (2020-12-11)

Blocking protein restores strength, endurance in old mice, Stanford study finds
A single protein is a master regulator of mouse muscle function during aging, a Stanford study finds. Blocking this protein increased muscle strength and endurance in old animals. It may play a role in age-related muscle weakening in humans. (2020-12-10)

New JILA tools 'turn on' quantum gases of ultracold molecules
JILA researchers have developed tools to 'turn on' quantum gases of ultracold molecules, gaining control of long-distance molecular interactions for potential applications such as encoding data for quantum computing and simulations. (2020-12-09)

Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.