Current Elections News and Events

Current Elections News and Events, Elections News Articles.
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Like it or not, history shows that taxes and bureaucracy are cornerstones of democracy
A team of anthropologists assembled data on 30 pre-modern societies, and conducted a quantitative analysis of the features and durability of 'good governance'--that is, receptiveness to citizen voice, provision of goods and services, and limited concentration of wealth and power. The results showed that societies based on a broad, equitable, well-managed tax system and functioning bureaucracies were statistically more likely to have political institutions that were more open to public input and more sensitive to the well-being of the populace. (2021-02-18)

Electrons caught in the act
Tsukuba University scientists create movies of the ultrafast motion of electrons traveling through an organic semiconductor with atomic-level resolution. This work may lead to more powerful and miniaturized smart devices. (2021-01-21)

Motherhood does not drive support for gun control
Moms are not more likely than other women to support gun control efforts. In fact, a new study finds that parenthood doesn't have a substantial effect on the gun control views of men or women. (2021-01-11)

BAME parliamentary candidates not picked to fight 'winnable seats' in areas with less tolerance towa
Political parties are increasingly likely to avoid selecting ethnic minority candidates for 'winnable' constituencies at General Elections in areas where there are less tolerant attitudes toward diversity, research suggests. (2021-01-11)

Why does it matter if most Republican voters still think Biden lost?
As President-elect Joe Biden and his administrative team officially begin the transition process, only about 20 percent of Republican voters consider him the true winner of the election. Nearly half of all respondents--48 percent--still expect President Donald Trump to be inaugurated for a second term on January 20, despite plenty of indicators to the contrary. Those are among the findings of the latest Bright Line Watch (November) survey--conducted by political science faculty at the University of Rochester, Chicago, and Dartmouth. (2020-12-02)

A study analyses what leads US citizens to support intervention abroad
Researchers at UPF and at the Catholic University of Leuven have studied the different motivations and ways whereby the US intervenes in other countries to promote democracy, such as foreign aid, economic sanctions and military intervention. (2020-11-17)

Experts see substantial danger to democratic stability around 2020 election
The latest Bright Line Watch survey finds substantial risks to the legitimacy of the election, including potential problems in the casting and counting of votes, the Electoral College, and in the resolution of electoral disputes. (2020-10-30)

How Twitter takes votes away from Trump but not from Republicans
In the 2016 US presidential election, Twitter made independent voters less likely to vote for Donald Trump, finds new study from Bocconi University and Princeton (2020-10-29)

Disease-transmission model forecasts election outcomes
To simulate how interactions between voters may play a role in the upcoming presidential, gubernatorial and senatorial elections, a Northwestern University research team is adapting a model that is commonly used to study infectious diseases. (2020-10-29)

How hard is it to vote in your state?
A new analysis identifies U.S. states that make it easiest, and those that make it more challenging, to register and vote. (2020-10-28)

Forecasting elections with a model of infectious diseases
Election forecasting is an innately challenging endeavor, with results that can be difficult to interpret and may leave many questions unanswered after close races unfold. In a paper publishing in SIAM Review, researchers borrowed ideas from epidemiology to develop a new method for forecasting elections. The team hoped the multidisciplinary nature of their infectious disease model could expand the community that engages with polling data and raise research questions from a new perspective. (2020-10-28)

Former rebel groups become more moderate after gaining political power in nations with democracy, research shows
Former rebel groups who transform into political parties have adopted a moderate stance after gaining power in more democratic political systems, a study shows. (2020-10-26)

Voters unlikely to blame politicians for their handling of the pandemic at next election
Politicians are unlikely to be punished or rewarded for their failures or successes in managing the coronavirus pandemic at the next election, suggests an analysis of survey data from the US, the UK and India, published in the online journal BMJ Global Health. (2020-10-22)

When good governments go bad
When anthropologists examined a broad, global sample of 30 pre-modern societies, they found that when 'good' governments -- ones that provided goods and services for their people and did not starkly concentrate wealth and power -- fell apart, they broke down more intensely than collapsing despotic regimes. And the researchers found a common thread in the collapse of good governments: leaders who undermined and broke from upholding core societal principles, morals, and ideals. It's... relevant. (2020-10-16)

Only 7% of US school districts in poorer, ethnic minority populations to reopen this fall
US schools in poor districts with large non-white student populations are less likely to reopen fully this academic year, according to a major new study published in the peer-reviewed Journal of School Choice. (2020-10-14)

Coordinated efforts on Twitter to interfere in US elections are foreign-based
An analysis of more than 2.2 million tweets has found a coordinated effort to influence the upcoming U.S. presidential election by sowing distrust, exacerbating political divisions and undermining confidence in American democracy. The effort is most likely foreign, according to the study. (2020-10-08)

New research determines if political "air war" or "ground game" is most effective
CATONSVILLE, MD, October 7, 2020 - New research has shed light on how various political campaign activities influence voters. It found that a candidate's mass media advertising is more likely to influence independent voters, while the campaign's ''ground game,'' targeting voters through grassroots outreach, is more effective at reaching a candidate's base. (2020-10-07)

Foreign election interference focuses on cultivating distrust, reducing consensus
Recent efforts by Russia to meddle in US elections are based largely on strategies developed by the Soviet Union during the Cold War, and partly aim to elicit strong reactions and drive people to extreme positions to lower the odds they will reach a consensus, a new study says. (2020-10-01)

Friend-to-friend texting may be the most effective voter mobilization tactic during 2020 election
DSI postdoctoral fellow Aaron Schein studies text messaging and voter engagement during pandemic-related social distancing. (2020-09-29)

Higher narcissism may be linked with more political participation
A politically engaged electorate is key to any thriving democracy, but not everyone participates in elections and other political activities. New Penn State research found that people who are narcissistic may also be more politically active. (2020-09-25)

A change at the top before elections boosts MP turnover across Europe, research shows
Appointing a new leader just before an election leads to a higher turnover of MPs after the poll, a study of political parties across Europe during the past 80 years shows. (2020-09-14)

US democratic indicators plummet amid racial justice protests and pandemic
The health of democracy in the United States has reached its lowest point since an academic watchdog group of political scientists began tracking its performance in 2017. Results of the August 2020 expert survey from Bright Line Watch show a new low of 61 out of 100 on the group's scale. (2020-09-11)

Superconductors are super resilient to magnetic fields
A Professor at the University of Tsukuba provides a new theoretical mechanism that explains the ability of superconductive materials to bounce back from being exposed to a magnetic field. This work may lead to energy systems that operate without resistive losses. It is also useful for building qubits for quantum computers. (2020-09-10)

Survey finds election concerns vary by race, education levels, party affiliation
The coronavirus pandemic is creating concerns about the safety of the 2020 elections, with some people also questioning the integrity of the safety precautions being taken. A new survey finds that while most voters believe that voting will be safe and that their ballot will be counted despite the pandemic, those who question election safety and some who question election integrity appear less likely to vote. (2020-08-27)

Mandatory vote-by-mail modestly increases voter turnout without giving either party an edge in elections, study suggests
Mandatory vote-by-mail modestly increases voter turnout without advantaging one party over the other, according to a causal inference analysis of 30 years of nationwide US county-level data and more than 40 million individual-level voter records from the states of Washington and Utah. The results support that this alternative to in-person voting - which has recently (2020-08-26)

Trust the power of markets
Organizations using groups or committees to make decisions might do better to crowdsource their decisions, says UC Riverside-led research. The study found that people trust groups even though their susceptibility to manipulation can cause poor decisions. Information markets, in which people bet on potential outcomes, make more accurate decisions, but people trust them less. Once people get used to using markets they trust them more, making markets a useful decision-making tool for large organizations. (2020-08-25)

The brains of nonpartisans are different from those who register to vote with a party
The brains of people with no political allegiance are different from those who strongly support one party, major new research shows. (2020-08-10)

Many states lack election flexibility needed to address pandemic safety concerns
The coronavirus pandemic poses unprecedented safety challenges to the nation's elections and significantly disrupted elections held this spring. A new study finds that many states continue to lack the policies and preparations needed to address safety concerns of holding elections in November. The analysis also concludes that all the options available to improve safety during the 2020 election have a low risk of threatening the integrity of balloting. (2020-08-05)

A rebranding of 'freedom'?
According to recent Gallup polls, socialism is now more popular than capitalism among Democrats and young people, and support for ''some form of socialism'' among all Americans is at 43% (compared to 25% in 1942). Policies that went unmentioned or were declared out-of-bounds in elections four years ago -- a federal jobs guarantee, single-payer health care, free college, massive tax hikes on the rich, and the Green New Deal--are commonplace in Democrats' 2020 campaigns. (2020-07-31)

Machine learning system can detect foreign social media influence campaigns using content alone
Researchers have developed an automated machine learning system they say can detect social media posts involved in coordinated political influence campaigns -- such as Russia's alleged efforts to sway the results of the 2016 elections in the United States -- regardless of platform and based only on the content of the posts. (2020-07-22)

Do campaign finance reforms truly help make elections more competitive?
A new study by two social scientists at the University of Missouri finds state campaign finance reforms actually have no beneficial effect on the competitiveness of state legislative elections. Instead, some reforms, such as limits on corporate political spending and public financing of elections, advantage incumbents. (2020-07-15)

Correlations identified between insurance coverage and states' voting patterns
Researchers at Case Western Reserve University reviewed national data from the U.S. Census Bureau and found associations between states' voting patterns in the 2016 presidential elections and decreases in the number of adults 18 to 64 years of age without health insurance coverage. (2020-07-14)

'Game changer' for reporters: 2016 US presidential election coverage
The 2016 US presidential election is considered a 'game changer' for journalists covering the US presidential elections by causing them to dramatically reconsider how they view their role -- either as neutral disseminators of information or impassioned advocates for the truth -- according to researchers at the University of Missouri's School of Journalism. (2020-06-22)

"Fake news" lowers trust in mainstream media across party lines, study finds
A Rutgers-led study finds that online misinformation, or ''fake news,'' lowers people's trust in mainstream media across party lines. (2020-06-18)

We can't (and shouldn't) expect clinicians without PPE to treat COVID-19 patients
We can't, and shouldn't, expect healthcare professionals without adequate personal protective equipment (PPE) to risk their lives to care for patients with COVID-19 infection, contends an expert in a stinging rebuke, published in the Journal of Medical Ethics. (2020-05-21)

Women quotas in politics have unintended consequences
Women continue to be scarce in the halls of power. To rectify this inequality, many countries have imposed female electoral quota systems, or rules designed to increase the representation of women. The catch? Boosting gender may well curtail representation in other respects. (2020-05-21)

How robust is e-government in American state election administration?
A new study examined how well American states are using Internet-based platforms to disseminate electoral information and communicate with voters (2020-04-14)

Cybersecurity, tech infrastructure requires international trust
In new research published in the Journal Technology and Culture, Rebecca Slayton, professor of science and technology studies at Cornell University, uses the field of incident response to shed light on how experts -- and nations -- can more effectively combat cyberwarfare when they foster trust and transcend politics. (2020-04-13)

Researchers develop early warning system to fight disinformation online
The Notre Dame project is an effort to combat the rise of coordinated social media campaigns to incite violence, sew discord and threaten the integrity of democratic elections. (2020-03-24)

UC research: Women tend to run more sophisticated political campaigns
Women run more sophisticated campaigns for office than men, says David Niven, a leading political researcher and associate professor of political science at the University of Cincinnati. (2020-03-18)

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