Current Electronics News and Events

Current Electronics News and Events, Electronics News Articles.
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Researchers create 'beautiful marriage' of quantum enemies
Cornell University scientists have identified a new contender when it comes to quantum materials for computing and low-temperature electronics. (2021-02-22)

3D-printing perovskites on graphene makes next-gen X-ray detectors
By using 3D aerosol jet-printing to put perovskites on graphene, scientists at EPFL have made X-ray detectors with record sensitivity that can greatly improve the efficiency and reduce the cost and health hazard of medical imaging devices. (2021-02-17)

This robot doesn't need any electronics
Engineers at the University of California San Diego have created a four-legged soft robot that doesn't need any electronics to work. The robot only needs a constant source of pressurized air for all its functions, including its controls and locomotion systems. The team, led by Michael T. Tolley, a professor of mechanical engineering at the Jacobs School of Engineering at UC San Diego, details its findings in the Feb. 17, 2021 issue of Science Robotics. (2021-02-17)

Nanowire could provide a stable, easy-to-make superconducting transistor
MIT researchers developed a superconducting nanowire that could enable efficient, easy-to-make electronics. The advance could boost quantum computing, as well as magnetic sensors for applications in brain imaging and telescopes. (2021-02-11)

A scalable method for the large-area integration of 2D materials
Graphene Flagship researchers report a new method to integrate graphene and 2D materials into semiconductor manufacturing lines, a milestone for the recently launched 2D-EPL project. (2021-02-10)

Scientists create armour for fragile quantum technology
An ANU-led international team has invented the equivalent of 'body armour' for extremely fragile quantum systems, which will make them robust enough to be used as the basis for a new generation of low-energy electronics. (2021-02-08)

A magnetic twist to graphene
By combining ferromagnets and two rotated layers of graphene, researchers open up a new platform for strongly interacting states using graphene's unique quantum degree of freedom. (2021-02-08)

Imaging technique provides link to innovative products
A study led by University of Georgia researchers announces the successful use of a new nanoimaging technique that will allow researchers to test and identify two-dimensional materials (2021-02-04)

Load-reducing backpack powers electronics by harvesting energy from walking
Hikers, soldiers and school children all know the burden of a heavy backpack. But now, researchers have developed a prototype that not only makes loads feel about 20% lighter, but also harvests energy from human movements to power small electronics. The new backpack, reported in ACS Nano, could be especially useful for athletes, explorers and disaster rescuers who work in remote areas without electricity, the researchers say. (2021-02-03)

New piezoelectric material remains effective to high temperatures
Piezoelectric materials hold great promise as sensors and as energy harvesters but are normally much less effective at high temperatures, limiting their use in environments such as engines or space exploration. However, a new piezoelectric device developed by a team of researchers from Penn State and QorTek remains highly effective at elevated temperatures. (2021-02-03)

Fine tuned: adjusting the composition and properties of semiconducting 2D alloys
Semiconducting 2D alloys could be key to overcoming the technical limitations of modern electronics. Although 2D Si-Ge alloys would have interesting properties for this purpose, they were only predicted theoretically. Now, scientists from Japan Advanced Institute of Science and Technology have realized the first experimental demonstration. They have also shown that the Si to Ge ratio can be adjusted to fine tune the electronic properties of the alloys, paving the way for novel applications. (2021-02-02)

Going Organic: uOttawa team realizing the limitless possibilities of wearable electronics
uOttawa Professor Benoît Lessard and his team are developing carbon-based technologies which could lead to improved flexible phone displays, make robotic skin more sensitive and allow for wearable electronics that could monitor the physical health of athletes in real-time. (2021-01-27)

Biodegradable displays for sustainable electronics
Increasing use of electronic devices in consumables and new technologies for the internet of things are increasing the amount of electronic scrap. To save resources and minimize waste volumes, an eco-friendlier production and more sustainable lifecycle will be needed. Scientists of KIT have now been the first to produce displays, whose biodegradability has been checked and certified by an independent office. The results are reported in the Journal of Materials Chemistry. (DOI: 10.1039/d0tc04627b) (2021-01-26)

Graphene Flagship study predicts increased market penetration by 2025
Graphene Flagship experts identify key opportunities in graphene commercialisation after a comprehensive three-year analysis of production methods and potential applications. (2021-01-25)

With new design, stretchable electronics perform better under strain
Researchers have created stretchable electronics that are less compromised by deformation. They also created several circuit elements with the design, which could lead to even more types of stretchable electronics. (2021-01-25)

Crystal structures in super slow motion
Laser beams are used to change the properties of materials in an extremely precise way. However, the underlying processes generally take place at such unimaginably fast speeds and at such a small scale that they have so far eluded direct observation. Göttingen researchers have now managed to film, for the first time, the laser transformation of a crystal structure with nanometre resolution and in slow motion in an electron microscope. The results were published in Science. (2021-01-22)

Angstrom multilayer metrology by combining spectral measurements and machine learning
The 3D-NAND is the most commercially successful 3D memory device today, and its demand is growing exponentially. As each layer thickness corresponds to the effective channel length, accurate characterization and control of layer-by-layer thickness is critical. Engineers in South Korea invented a nondestructive thickness characterization method of each layer in semiconductor multilayer stacks with more than 200 layers used for 3D-NAND. The method will provide new ways for total inspection in 3D semiconductor device manufacturing. (2021-01-20)

Nano-thin piezoelectrics advance self-powered electronics
Researchers develop a flexible, printable and nano-thin material that can convert mechanical pressure into electrical energy. It's 800% more efficient than other piezoelectrics based on similar non-toxic materials. A significant step towards better wearable tech, new self-powered electronics and even pacemakers powered by heart beats (2021-01-19)

Nanosheet-based electronics could be one drop away
A surprisingly simple method improves 'drop casting' fabrication of tiled nanosheets that could be used in next-generation electronic devices. All you need is a pipette and a hotplate. (2021-01-12)

Team creates hybrid chips with processors and memory to run AI on battery-powered devices
Transactions between processors and memory can consume 95 percent of the energy needed to do machine learning and AI, which severely limits battery life. A team led by Stanford engineers has designed a system that can run AI tasks faster, and with less energy, by harnessing eight hybrid chips, each with its own data processor built right next to its own memory storage. (2021-01-11)

Material for future electronics: New method makes graphene nanoribbons easier to produce
Russian researchers have proposed a new method for synthesizing high-quality graphene nanoribbons -- a material with potential for applications in flexible electronics, solar cells, LEDs, lasers, and more. Presented in The Journal of Physical Chemistry C, the original approach to chemical vapor deposition, offers a higher yield at a lower cost, compared with the currently used nanoribbon self-assembly on noble metal substrates. (2021-01-11)

Old silicon learns new tricks
Researchers from Nara Institute of Science and Technology fabricated regular arrays of iron-coated silicon crystals that are atomically smooth. The defect-free pyramidal composition of the crystals impart magnetic properties that will enhance the functionality of 3D spintronics and other technologies. (2021-01-06)

Microfabricated elastic diamonds improve material's electronic properties
Overcoming a key obstacle in achieving diamond-based electronic and optoelectronic devices, researchers have presented a new way to fabricate micrometer-sized diamonds that can elastically stretch. (2020-12-31)

Electrons hop to it on twisted molecular wires
Osaka University scientists show how purposely introducing twists into molecular wires can improve their electrical conductivity. This work may lead to sophisticated and more ecofriendly smartphones and other electronic devices. (2020-12-29)

Atomic-scale nanowires can now be produced at scale
Researchers from Tokyo Metropolitan University have discovered a way to make self-assembled nanowires of transition metal chalcogenides at scale using chemical vapor deposition. By changing the substrate where the wires form, they can tune how these wires are arranged, from aligned configurations of atomically thin sheets to random networks of bundles. This paves the way to industrial deployment in next-gen industrial electronics, including energy harvesting, and transparent, efficient, even flexible devices. (2020-12-24)

Scientists develop an efficient way to produce low-cost heatsinks
NUST MISIS scientists found a way to reduce the cost of industrial and electronics heatsinks production up to 10 times. Consequently, the product itself would also cost less. The proposed methods presume the use of rubbers and silicon carbide as components, i.e. these components are mixed, pressed and sintered. The article on the research is published in Polymers. (2020-12-21)

New discovery brings analogue spintronic devices closer
The observation of nonlinearity in electron spin-related processes in graphene makes it easier to transport, manipulate and detect spins, as well as spin-to-charge conversion. It also allows analogue operations such as amplitude modulation and spin amplification. This brings spintronics to the point where regular electronics was after the introduction of the first transistors. These results by University of Groningen physicists were published in the journal Physical Review Applied on 17 December. (2020-12-18)

A new method for the functionalization of graphene
An international research team involving Professor Federico Rosei of the Institut national de la recherche scientifique (INRS) has demonstrated a novel process to modify the structure and properties of graphene, a one atom thick carbon. (2020-12-16)

Flexible and powerful electronics
A team of researchers led by the University of Tsukuba has developed a method for optimizing the electrical properties of carbon-based conductors by turning them into an ionic gel. This work may open the way for cheap, highly efficient sensors that can be printed on flexible surfaces. (2020-12-16)

Toward imperceptible electronics that you cannot see or feel
Researchers from Osaka University fabricated transparent, ultrathin, flexible sensors with cross-aligned silver nanowire microelectronics fabricated using print technique that would be inexpensive and straightforward to mass-produce. This advance will find much use in biometrics and many other applications that require underlying visual observation. (2020-12-14)

This flexible and rechargeable battery is 10 times more powerful than state of the art
A team of researchers has developed a flexible, rechargeable silver oxide-zinc battery with a five to 10 times greater areal energy density than state of the art. The battery also is easier to manufacture; while most flexible batteries need to be manufactured in sterile conditions, under vacuum, this one can be screen printed in normal lab conditions. The device can be used in flexible, stretchable electronics for wearables as well as soft robotics. (2020-12-07)

No strings attached: maximizing wireless charging efficiency with multiple transmitters
Scientists at Incheon National University, Korea, develop a control strategy that allows for transferring power wirelessly through multiple transmitter coils with maximum efficiency. Unlike conventional approaches in which only the transmitter closer to the receiver is active, this novel method dispatches the optimal amount of current to each transmitter, depending on the degree of coupling with the receiver. This technique will help surpass the hurdles of wired charging in electric vehicles and industrial robots. (2020-12-04)

Cooling electronics efficiently with graphene-enhanced heat pipes
Researchers at Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, have found that graphene-based heat pipes can help solve the problems of cooling electronics and power systems used in avionics, data centres, and other power electronics. (2020-12-03)

Electronic waste on the decline, new study finds
A new study, led by a researcher at the Yale School of the Environment's Center for Industrial Ecology and published recently in the Journal of Industrial Ecology, has found that the total mass of electronic waste generated by Americans has been declining since 2015. This surprising finding has ramifications for both how we think about electronic waste's future and for the laws and regulations regarding e-waste recycling, according to the study's authors. (2020-12-01)

FEFU scientists explain how to storage cipher data in magnetic skyrmions
Scientists of Far Eastern Federal University (FEFU) with international collaborators propose direct magnetic writing of skyrmions, i.e. magnetic quasiparticles, and skyrmion lattices, within which it is possible to encode, transmit, process information, and produce topological patterns with a resolution of less than 100 nanometers. This brings closer miniaturized post-silicon electronics, new topological cryptography techniques, and green data centers, reducing the load on the Earth's ecosystem significantly. A related article appears in ACS Nano. (2020-11-30)

Electronic skin has a strong future stretching ahead
Soft, stretchy, slimline and strong electronics could accelerate the arrival of artificial skin. (2020-11-27)

Laser technology: New trick for infrared laser pulses
For a long time, scientists have been looking for simple methods to produce infrared laser pulses. Now a new method has been presented that does not require large experimental setups; it can be easily miniaturized and is therefore particularly interesting for practical applications. (2020-11-23)

Scientists develop a magnetic switch with lower energy consumption
Joint research conducted by the UAB has shown the ability to switch magnetizacion « on » and « off » using voltage in a new class of easy-to-fabricate materials containing nitrogen. These results, published in Nature Communications, may be used to reduce energy consumption in electronic technologies. (2020-11-18)

A 2D perspective: stacking materials to realize a low power consuming future
Scientists have designed a 2D material-based multi-stacked structure comprising tungsten disulfide (WS2) layer sandwiched between hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) layers that displays long-range interaction between successive WS2 layers with potential for reducing circuit design complexity and power consumption. (2020-11-18)

NIST sensor experts invent supercool mini thermometer
Researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have invented a miniature thermometer with big potential applications such as monitoring the temperature of processor chips in superconductor-based quantum computers, which must stay cold to work properly. (2020-11-17)

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