Current Embryo News and Events

Current Embryo News and Events, Embryo News Articles.
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Earliest signs of an immune response found in developing embryos
Researchers at the Centre for Genomic Regulation reveal that newly formed embryos clear dying cells to maximise their chances of survival. It is the earliest display of an innate immune response found in vertebrate animals to date. The findings may aid future efforts to understand why some embryos fail to form in the earliest stages of development, and lead to new clinical efforts in treating infertility or early miscarriages. (2021-02-10)

NIH researchers identify new genetic disorder that affects brain, craniofacial skeleton
Researchers at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) have discovered a new genetic disorder characterized by developmental delays and malformations of the brain, heart, and facial features. (2021-01-20)

Higher live birth rates found after transferring fresh rather than frozen embryos...
Leveraging national data from the Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology (SART), the Brigham researchers found that, in cycles using freshly retrieved donor eggs, fresh embryo transfers were indeed associated with significantly higher live birth rates compared to frozen embryo transfers. The team's findings are published in JAMA. (2021-01-12)

Patterns in primordial germ cell migration
Biologists and mathematicians at the Universities of Münster and Erlangen-Nürnberg investigated how primordial germ cells behave in zebrafish embryos when not influenced by a guidance cue and developed software that merges 3D microscopy images of multiple organisms. This made it possible to recognise patterns in the cell distribution and thus to highlight tissues that influence cell migration. The study was published in 'Science Advances'. (2021-01-07)

Cancer cells hibernate like bears to evade harsh chemotherapy
Dr. Catherine O'Brien's study is the first to identify that cancer cells hijack an evolutionary conserved program to survive chemotherapy. Furthermore, the researchers show that novel therapeutic strategies aimed at specifically targeting cancer cells in this slow-dividing state can prevent cancer regrowth. (2021-01-07)

Researchers discover how a bio-pesticide works against spider mites
Scientists have uncovered why a food-ingredient-based pesticide made from safflower and cottonseed oils is effective against two-spotted spider mites that attack over a thousand species of plants while sparing the mites' natural predators. (2021-01-06)

How roundworms decide the time is right
The roundworm C. elegans matches its development to the amount of food in its environment. It uses a protein called BLMP-1 to open up a large set of developmental genes, priming them to turn on when food is plentiful. Humans have a protein with a similar function that is known to be overactive in some blood cancers. (2020-12-22)

A powerful computational tool for efficient analysis of cell division 4D image data
A joint research team co-led by City University of Hong Kong (CityU) has developed a novel computational tool that can reconstruct and visualise three-dimensional (3D) shapes and temporal changes of cells, speeding up the analysing process from hundreds of hours by hand to a few hours by the computer. Revolutionising the way biologists analyse image data, this tool can advance further studies in developmental and cell biology, such as the growth of cancer cells. (2020-12-22)

Ensuring a proper body plan
Researchers from the University of Tsukuba have shown that the enzyme lysine demethylase 7a helps ensure the ordered axial development of the mouse embryo by modulating Hox genes which specify positional characteristics along the head-to-tail axis. Their findings suggest that the enzyme modulates Hox gene activation by regulating the repressive histone mark H3K9me2, an epigenetic modification of the DNA packaging protein Histone H3. This study opens avenues for further research into evolutionary developmental biology. (2020-12-16)

Research dispels fears human stem cells contain cancer-causing mutations
Pioneering new research has made a pivotal breakthrough that dispel concerns that human stem cells could contain cancer-causing mutations. (2020-12-14)

Embryonic development in a petri dish
3D cell culturing technique could replace mouse embryos (2020-12-10)

Mother's touch lingers in her child's genes
Mothers leave their mark on their children in many ways - and Melbourne researchers have discovered a protein called SMCHD1 is involved in this 'imprinting' process. SMCHD1 switches certain genes off, altering how a cell behaves. The new research has revealed that when an egg cell (or oocyte) is fertilised by a sperm, the egg cell's SMCHD1 lingers within the developing embryo, switching off at least 10 different genes and impacting the embryo's development - which could potentially have a lifelong impact on the offspring. (2020-11-23)

Single-cell technique could provide 'egg health' indicators
Using the power of single-cell analysis, researchers at the Babraham Institute have assessed the effects of age on egg cells (oocytes) in mice, particularly looking to identify genomic and epigenetic factors that relate to reduced developmental competence. The knowledge uncovered by this research provides new insights into the mechanisms underlying egg quality and is relevant to the development of techniques to assess the quality of human egg cells, an area of growing importance as the use of fertility treatments increases. (2020-11-18)

Gut check: Teff grain boosts stomach microbiome health
Cornell University food scientists confirm that the grain teff helps the stomach and enhances the nutritional value of iron and zinc, according to a new modeling method. (2020-11-13)

Born to be young?
The environment we experience in early-life is known to have major consequences on later-life health and lifespan. A new study led from the University of Turku in Finland using an avian model suggests that increased prenatal exposure to maternal thyroid hormones could have beneficial effects on the 'biological age' at birth. (2020-11-11)

Organoids produce embryonic heart
Bioengineers at EPFL have used organoids - tiny lab-grown organs - to mimic the early development of the heart in the mouse embryo. The work is another step towards future bioartificial organs for research and transplants. (2020-11-10)

Trehalose 6-phosphate promotes seed filling by activating auxin biosynthesis
Plants undergo several developmental transitions during their life cycle. The differentiation of the young embryo from a meristem like structure into a highly specialized storage organ, is believed to be controlled by local connections between sugars and hormonal response systems. By modulating the trehalose 6?phosphate (T6P) content in growing embryos of pea (Pisum sativum), an international research team led by the Leibniz Institute of Plant Genetics and Crop Plant Research (IPK) investigated the role of this signaling sugar during the seed?filling process. (2020-11-05)

Beetle larvae think with a brain 'under construction'
In human brains, hundreds of billions of nerve cells are interconnected in the most complicated way. This is no different for insects, although their brains 'only' have up to one million nerve cells. To a large extent, the brain develops in the embryo, but in many animals it is completed only after birth. Biologists from Göttingen University found that beetle larvae start using their brains, although still 'under construction'. Results were published in PLOS Biology. (2020-11-01)

Study identifies pitfall for correcting mutations in human embryos with CRISPR
The most detailed analysis to date of CRISPR genome editing in human embryos finds a significant risk of chromosomal abnormalities when using the technique at earliest stage of human development. (2020-10-29)

Paper: Congress must clarify limits of gene-editing technologies
How the next Congress decides to handle the issue editing human sperm and eggs will affect the science, ethics and financing of genomic editing for decades to come, said Jacob S. Sherkow, a professor of law at Illinois who studies the ethical and policy implications of advanced biotechnologies. (2020-10-21)

Childlessness by circumstance
Why zebra finches have problems with reproduction. (2020-10-20)

Nanodevices show how living cells change with time, by tracking from the inside
For the first time, scientists have introduced minuscule tracking devices directly into the interior of mammalian cells, giving an unprecedented peek into the processes that govern the beginning of development. (2020-10-20)

Survey finds American support for human-animal chimera research
In September 2015, the US National Institutes of Health placed a funding moratorium on research that involves introducing human pluripotent stem cells into animal embryos. To assess attitudes on human-animal chimeric embryo research, investigators conducted a survey among 430 Americans. The results of the survey, which found that 82% of people are supportive of at least some parts of this research, appear October 1 in the journal Stem Cell Reports. (2020-10-01)

How cells build organisms
Researchers at Harvard Medical School have discovered a key control mechanism that cells use to self-organize in early embryonic development. The findings, published in Science, shed light on a process fundamental to multicellular life and open new avenues for improved tissue and organ engineering strategies. (2020-10-01)

Researchers discover a new method to regulate cell plasticity
Researchers at IRB Barcelona's Cellular Plasticity and Disease Laboratory propose a more efficient way to limit cell plasticity without causing cell damage. The new method sheds light on processes in which cell plasticity is important, such as cancer and immunology. The study has been published in the journal Nature Cell Biology and has been supported by ''la Caixa'' Foundation. (2020-09-28)

Placenta is initiated first, as cells of a fertilised egg divide and specialise
The first stages of placental development take place days before the embryo starts to form in human pregnancies. The finding highlights the importance of healthy placental development in pregnancy, and could lead to future improvements in fertility treatments such as IVF, and a better understanding of placental-related diseases in pregnancy. (2020-09-24)

Study shows vitamin E needed for proper nervous system development
- In research with key ramifications for women of childbearing age, scientists show that embryos produced by vitamin E-deficient zebrafish have malformed brains and nervous systems. (2020-09-21)

Artificial intelligence system developed to help better select embryos for implantation
Investigators from Brigham and Women's Hospital and Massachusetts General Hospital are developing an artificial intelligence system with the goal of improving IVF success by helping embryologists objectively select embryos most likely to result in a healthy birth. (2020-09-15)

Embryos taking shape via buckling
The embryo of an animal first looks like a hollow sphere. Invaginations then appear at different stages of development, which will give rise to the body's structures. Although buckling could be the dominant mechanism that triggers invagination, it has never been possible of measuring the tiny forces involved. This gap has finally been filled thanks to a study carried out by scientists from the University of Geneva. (2020-09-14)

Origin of a complex life form revealed
Researchers from McGill University have revealed the steps by which two very distinct organisms -- bacteria and carpenter ants -- have come to depend on one another for survival to become a single complex life form. The study, published today in Nature, shows that the two species have collaborated to radically alter the development of the ant embryo to allow this integration to happen. (2020-09-02)

Newly discovered rare dinosaur embryos show sauropods had rhino-like horns
An incredibly rare dinosaur embryo discovered perfectly preserved inside its egg has shown scientists new details of the development and appearance of sauropods which lived 80 million years ago. (2020-08-27)

Study reveals how two sex chromosomes communicate during female embryo development
Researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) have solved a mystery that has long puzzled scientists: How do the bodies of female humans and all other mammals decide which of the two X chromosomes it carries in each cell should be active and which one should be silent? (2020-08-17)

Scientists use CRISPR to knock down gene messages early in development
Researchers at the Stowers Institute for Medical Research in Kansas City, Missouri, and the Andalusian Center of Developmental Biology at Pablo de Olavide University in Seville, Spain, have harnessed the technology to target gene messages (messenger RNA) involved in early vertebrate development. (2020-08-07)

Cell diversity in the embryo
Epigenetic factors control the development of an organism. (2020-08-04)

Study suggests embryos could be susceptible to coronavirus
Genes that are thought to play a role in how the SARS-CoV-2 virus infects our cells have been found to be active in embryos as early as during the second week of pregnancy, say scientists at the University of Cambridge and the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The researchers say this could mean embryos are susceptible to COVID-19 if the mother gets sick, potentially affecting the chances of a successful pregnancy. (2020-08-04)

First gene knockout in a cephalopod is achieved at Marine Biological Laboratory
A team at the Marine Biological Laboratory (MBL) has achieved the first gene knockout in a cephalopod using the squid Doryteuthis pealeii, an exceptionally important research organism in biology for nearly a century. The milestone study is reported in the July 30 issue of Current Biology. The team used CRISPR-Cas9 genome editing to knock out a pigmentation gene in squid embryos, which eliminated pigmentation in the eye and in skin cells (chromatophores) with high efficiency. (2020-07-30)

Meet Cosmo, a bull calf designed to produce 75% male offspring
Scientists at the University of California, Davis, have successfully produced a bull calf, named Cosmo, who was genome-edited as an embryo so that he'll produce more male offspring. (2020-07-23)

Complex developmental patterns are under the control of surprisingly simple signals
Princeton University researchers explored how patterns of protein activity direct fly embryonic development by using 'optogenetic' techniques to rapidly and precisely turn Ras/Erk signaling on and off. A paper published July 23 in Current Biology by Heath Johnson, Nareg Djabrayan, Stanislav Shvartsman and Jared Toettcher describes these findings. (2020-07-23)

Simple twist of DNA determines fate of placenta
The development of the mammalian placenta depends upon an unusual twist that separates DNA's classic double helix into a single-stranded form, Yale researchers report July 15 in the journal Nature. (2020-07-15)

Endometrial scratch of no value to first-time IVF patients in a large randomized trial
An add-on treatment commonly offered to patients in preparation for IVF has proved ineffective in a large-scale randomized trial of more than 1000 women. Those who had endometrial scratch before their first IVF treatment were found to be no more successful than a control group receiving routine treatment. (2020-07-08)

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