Current Embryonic Development News and Events

Current Embryonic Development News and Events, Embryonic Development News Articles.
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'Mini brain' organoids grown in lab mature much like infant brains
A new study from UCLA and Stanford University researchers finds that three-dimensional human stem cell-derived 'mini brain' organoids can mature in a manner that is strikingly similar to human brain development. (2021-02-22)

Earliest signs of an immune response found in developing embryos
Researchers at the Centre for Genomic Regulation reveal that newly formed embryos clear dying cells to maximise their chances of survival. It is the earliest display of an innate immune response found in vertebrate animals to date. The findings may aid future efforts to understand why some embryos fail to form in the earliest stages of development, and lead to new clinical efforts in treating infertility or early miscarriages. (2021-02-10)

Synthetic biology reinvents development
The research team have used synthetic biology to develop a new type of genetic design that can reproduce some of the key processes that enable creating structures in natural systems, from termite nests to the development of embryos. (2021-02-01)

Aging-US: Growth factor beta type 1 and hypoxia-inducible factor 1 transcription complex
''The Aging-US authors report for the first time that in human breast cancer, AML and embryonic cells, HIF-1 and AP-1 upregulate the expression of TGF-╬▓'' (2021-01-25)

University of Cincinnati student uses zebrafish to study spinal deformities
Oriana Zinani, a doctoral student in molecular developmental biology at the University of Cincinnati, is part of a team of researchers using zebrafish embryos to study a gene mutation that causes scoliosis, a sideways curvature of the spine that typically occurs in humans just before puberty. (2021-01-22)

NIH researchers identify new genetic disorder that affects brain, craniofacial skeleton
Researchers at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) have discovered a new genetic disorder characterized by developmental delays and malformations of the brain, heart, and facial features. (2021-01-20)

MicroLED neural probe for neuroscience
Associate Professor Hiroto Sekiguchi and Ph.D. candidate Hiroki Yasunaga at Toyohashi University of Technology have developed a MicroLED neural probe for neuroscience. This MicroLED tool can optogenetically control and observe neural activity in the brain. Neural activity was successfully recorded using the neural probe, and sufficient light output was obtained from the MicroLED to activate neural activity. The developed MicroLED tool will contribute to the development of neuroscience research-purposed optogenetic technology. (2021-01-12)

Advances in understanding autism, based on "mosaic" mutations
Two studies in today's Nature Neuroscience, led by researchers at Boston Children's Hospital, Brigham and Women's Hospital (BWH), and Harvard Medical School (HMS), implicate mosaic mutations arising during embryonic development as a cause of autism spectrum disorder (ASD). The findings open new areas for exploring the genetics of ASD and could eventually inform diagnostic testing. (2021-01-11)

Tracking the formation of the early heart, cell by cell
Richard Tyser and colleagues have mapped the origins of the embryonic mouse heart at single-cell resolution, helping to define the cell types that make up the heart in the earliest days of development. (2021-01-07)

Cancer cells hibernate like bears to evade harsh chemotherapy
Dr. Catherine O'Brien's study is the first to identify that cancer cells hijack an evolutionary conserved program to survive chemotherapy. Furthermore, the researchers show that novel therapeutic strategies aimed at specifically targeting cancer cells in this slow-dividing state can prevent cancer regrowth. (2021-01-07)

Maternal Immune Activation Induces Sustained Changes in Fetal Microglia Motility
Researchers at the Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine have revealed that alterations in fetal microglia resulting from maternal inflammation could contribute towards the onset of developmental and psychiatric disorders. These results can help clarify how changes in microglial process motility affect the development of the neural network, thus contributing towards the treatment of these disorders. (2020-12-22)

UMD paves the way for growing human organs for transplantation with new proof-of-concept
With the number of people who suffer from organ failures and the growing need for available organs for transplant, finding a new way to provide organs and therapeutic options to transplant patients is a critical need. In a new paper, University of Maryland researchers show for the first time that newly established stem cells from pigs could provide a solution, laying the groundwork for growing transplantable human organs. (2020-12-17)

Creating a ground plan for stonefly evolution
A team led by the University of Tsukuba microscopically examined the eggs of stoneflies to identify ground plan features and shed light on the evolutionary history of the order. By identifying ancestral and derived features, the researchers reconstructed the evolution of egg structures, and confirmed that establishing an embryonic ground plan can provide unique insights into the evolution of the group. (2020-12-15)

Research dispels fears human stem cells contain cancer-causing mutations
Pioneering new research has made a pivotal breakthrough that dispel concerns that human stem cells could contain cancer-causing mutations. (2020-12-14)

Study reveals networks of genes involved in congenital heart disease
A group researchers at Gladstone Institutes and UC San Francisco led by Benoit Bruneau have made inroads into understanding what genes are improperly deployed in some cases of congenital heart disease. Their study, published in Developmental Cell, could point toward new ways to prevent or treat one of the most common birth defects. (2020-12-14)

Embryonic development in a petri dish
3D cell culturing technique could replace mouse embryos (2020-12-10)

Development of new stem cell type may lead to advances in regenerative medicine
A team led by UT Southwestern has derived a new ''intermediate'' embryonic stem cell type from multiple species that can contribute to chimeras and create precursors to sperm and eggs in a culture dish. (2020-12-03)

New activity found for CHD7, a protein factor vital in embryonic development
Research has yielded fundamental insights into the causes of severe birth defects known as CHARGE syndrome cases. These congenital birth defects include severe and life-threatening heart malformations. Researchers successfully inactivated the gene for CHD7 in the neural crest cells of mouse embryos, and then rigorously probed how this change in developing cardiac neural crest cells caused severe defects in the outflow tract and great arteries, leading to perinatal lethality. (2020-12-02)

How the insect got its wings: Scientists (at last!) tell the tale
How insect wings evolved has puzzled biologists for over a century. Finally, a team from the Marine Biological Laboratory, Woods Hole, has shown that the insect wing evolved from an outgrowth on the crustacean leg that was incorporated into the animal's body wall. (2020-12-01)

Researchers identify gene responsible for cellular aging
Cellular reprogramming can reverse the aging that leads to a decline in the activities and functions of mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs). A study released in STEM CELLS appears to have solved the mystery of which molecular mechanisms are responsible for this reversal and provides insight into developing pharmacological strategies to reduce or reverse the aging process. (2020-11-30)

Researchers uncover the unique way stem cells protect their chromosome ends
Telomeres are specialized structures at the end of chromosomes which protect our DNA and ensure healthy division of cells. According to a new study from researchers at the Francis Crick Institute published in Nature, the mechanisms of telomere protection are surprisingly unique in stem cells. (2020-11-25)

Mother's touch lingers in her child's genes
Mothers leave their mark on their children in many ways - and Melbourne researchers have discovered a protein called SMCHD1 is involved in this 'imprinting' process. SMCHD1 switches certain genes off, altering how a cell behaves. The new research has revealed that when an egg cell (or oocyte) is fertilised by a sperm, the egg cell's SMCHD1 lingers within the developing embryo, switching off at least 10 different genes and impacting the embryo's development - which could potentially have a lifelong impact on the offspring. (2020-11-23)

Unraveling a mystery surrounding embryonic cells
Last year, researchers at the University of California, Riverside, identified the early origins of neural crest cells -- embryonic cells in vertebrates that travel throughout the body and generate many cell types -- in chick embryos. Now the researchers have used a human model to figure out when neural crest cells acquire distinctive molecular and functional attributes. (2020-11-18)

The right tune for blood
Repetitive elements trigger RIG-I-like receptors to enhance hematopoietic stem cell formation (2020-11-15)

Gut check: Teff grain boosts stomach microbiome health
Cornell University food scientists confirm that the grain teff helps the stomach and enhances the nutritional value of iron and zinc, according to a new modeling method. (2020-11-13)

Organoids produce embryonic heart
Bioengineers at EPFL have used organoids - tiny lab-grown organs - to mimic the early development of the heart in the mouse embryo. The work is another step towards future bioartificial organs for research and transplants. (2020-11-10)

Cockroach mating habits and developmental features help uncover insect evolution
A research team led by the University of Tsukuba examined the mating habits of an often-overlooked cockroach family, Nocticolidae, to provide clues about insect evolution. Although the studied cockroaches displayed novel wing-flapping behavior prior to copulation, similarities in other mating habits, egg sac handling, and embryonic development between Nocticolidae and sister family Corydiidae suggested that the two groups share a common ancestor. Elucidating these relationships will help infer the evolutionary history of modern-day insects. (2020-11-05)

'Monster tumors' could offer new glimpse at human development
Finding just the right model to study human development--from the early embryonic stage onward--has been a challenge for scientists over the last decade. Now, bioengineers at the University of California San Diego have homed in on an unusual candidate: teratomas. (2020-11-04)

UConn researcher identifies genetic elements involved in heart development
Justin Cotney, assistant professor of genetics and genome sciences in the UConn School of Medicine, has identified a suite of genes and regulatory elements critical to normal heart development. (2020-11-03)

Beetle larvae think with a brain 'under construction'
In human brains, hundreds of billions of nerve cells are interconnected in the most complicated way. This is no different for insects, although their brains 'only' have up to one million nerve cells. To a large extent, the brain develops in the embryo, but in many animals it is completed only after birth. Biologists from G├Âttingen University found that beetle larvae start using their brains, although still 'under construction'. Results were published in PLOS Biology. (2020-11-01)

Brainstem neurons control both behaviour and misbehaviour
A recent study at the University of Helsinki reveals how gene control mechanisms define the identity of developing neurons in the brainstem. The researchers also showed that a failure in differentiation of the brainstem neurons leads to behavioural abnormalities, including hyperactivity and attention deficit. (2020-10-29)

Happiness and the evolution of brain size
Serotonin can act as a growth factor for the stem cells in the fetal human brain that determine brain size. (2020-10-23)

Researchers uncover crucial gene for growth of Ewing sarcoma
Researchers have discovered a gene that is critical for the development of Ewing sarcoma, a rare type of developmental cancer that presents in bones and soft tissues. Exploring the pharmacological inhibition of RING1B as a clinical therapy to treat Ewing sarcoma could open the door for new treatments for the rare disease. (2020-10-23)

Pituitary puzzle gets a new piece, revising evolutionary history
For decades, the front lobe of the pituitary was thought to be an evolutionary development that arose in vertebrates from a particular type of embryonic structure located in the ectoderm. USC researchers now present evidence that, in some vertebrates, the endoderm also forms part of the pituitary's front lobe. Findings from the study suggest that the gland may have a longer evolutionary history than previously thought. (2020-10-22)

Paper: Congress must clarify limits of gene-editing technologies
How the next Congress decides to handle the issue editing human sperm and eggs will affect the science, ethics and financing of genomic editing for decades to come, said Jacob S. Sherkow, a professor of law at Illinois who studies the ethical and policy implications of advanced biotechnologies. (2020-10-21)

Rare congenital heart defect rescued by protease inhibition
A research team at the Greenwood Genetic Center (GGC) has successfully used small molecules to restore normal heart and valve development in an animal model for Mucolipidosis II (ML II), a rare genetic disorder. The study is reported in this month's JCI Insight. (2020-10-15)

Reelin regulates proliferation and migration of oligodendrocyte progenitor cells
Secreted protein Reelin is famous for its role in the migration and morphogenesis of neurons. Here we show that it also regulates the proliferation and radial distribution of oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs). Because abnormalities in OPC development or function are involved in the pathogenesis of many neurological diseases, our findings may be relevant in understanding and therapeutic development of those disorders. (2020-10-15)

The choroid plexus: A conduit for prenatal inflammation?
New work offers an unprecedented real-time view of the choroid plexus in a mouse model, providing a glimpse of how disturbances of the mother's immune system during pregnancy disrupt the developing brain. (2020-10-09)

Researchers discover a new method to regulate cell plasticity
Researchers at IRB Barcelona's Cellular Plasticity and Disease Laboratory propose a more efficient way to limit cell plasticity without causing cell damage. The new method sheds light on processes in which cell plasticity is important, such as cancer and immunology. The study has been published in the journal Nature Cell Biology and has been supported by ''la Caixa'' Foundation. (2020-09-28)

How a single protein in non-neuronal cells controls brain development
Researchers from the University of Tsukuba identified the protein PRMT1 as an important regulator of glial cell function and normal brain development. They found that mice lacking PRMT1 during brain development showed significant inflammation as well as an increase in astrocyte and microglia cells in the postnatal period. These findings help clarify the molecular mechanisms of normal brain development. (2020-09-23)

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