Current Emergency Departments News and Events

Current Emergency Departments News and Events, Emergency Departments News Articles.
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UConn researcher offers lessons learned from a pre-pandemic study of telemedicine use
With the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, telemedicine has become a new norm for many routine and non-emergency medical needs. But there are lessons to be learned from telemedicine's use - or lack thereof - prior to the pandemic, and a new study from a UConn School of Social Work researcher offers insight for policymakers, administrators, and public health officials when considering the implementation of new services. (2021-02-22)

High patient uptake for text message system monitoring opioid use in real-time
Among the orthopaedic surgery patients in a study using text messaging to monitor opioid use, 61 percent of their tablets were found to be left over (2021-02-17)

People with and without AD have a different threshold for elective revascularisation
The risk of both mortality and rehospitalisation after an elective revascularisation procedure for coronary artery disease is similar for people with and without Alzheimer's disease (AD), but people with AD had worse outcomes after an emergency procedure, according to a new study from the University of Eastern Finland. (2021-02-15)

Bringing bad proteins back into the fold
A study led by UT Southwestern has identified a mechanism that controls the activity of proteins known as chaperones, which guide proteins to fold into the right shapes. The findings, published online today in Nature Communications, could shed light on hundreds of degenerative and neurodegenerative diseases caused by protein misfolding, such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and Huntington's, potentially leading to new treatments for these devastating conditions. (2021-02-11)

New ACIP Adult Immunization Schedule recommends changes to several vaccines, includes interim recomm
The Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) has released its 2021 Recommended Adult Immunization Schedule that includes changes to several vaccines including influenza, hepatitis A, human papillomavirus (HPV); and the measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) vaccine. The schedule also includes interim recommendations for COVID-19 vaccination. The complete schedule, including changes in the vaccine notes section, is being simultaneously published in Annals of Internal Medicine and on the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) web site. (2021-02-11)

Use of mobile stroke units improves clinical outcomes
STEMOs have been serving Berlin for ten years. The specialized stroke emergency response vehicles allow physicians to start treating stroke patients before they reach hospital. For the first time, a team of researchers from Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin has been able to show that the dispatch of mobile stroke units is linked to improved clinical outcomes. The researchers' findings, which show that patients for whom STEMOs were dispatched were more likely to survive without long-term disability, have been published in JAMA*. (2021-02-11)

Routine blood tests could be key to stopping the silent killer of liver disease
New research has shown that results of blood tests routinely performed by GPs everywhere contain a hidden fingerprint that can identify people silently developing potentially fatal liver cirrhosis. The researchers have developed an algorithm to detect this fingerprint that could be freely installed on any clinical computer, making this a low-cost way for GPs to carry out large scale screening using patient data they already hold. (2021-02-11)

Endovascular aneurysm repair linked to higher readmission rates
Ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms (rAAA) are responsible for nearly 2% of all deaths in U.S. men over the age of 65. Endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) has emerged as a newer and less invasive alternative to open repair for rAAA. But researchers from the University of Missouri School of Medicine have discovered that while EVAR is more commonly utilized for rAA, the odds of hospital readmission after EVAR are 1.5 times higher compared to traditional open repair. (2021-02-10)

New tool helps clinicians assess patients who develop COVID-19 symptoms
The newly developed COvid Risk cALculator (CORAL) standardizes the assessment of emergency department and hospitalized patients who develop symptoms of COVID-19. The tool minimizes the chance that a patient with a false-negative test escapes detection and indicates when a patient's probability of having COVID-19 is low enough that isolation can be discontinued. (2021-02-10)

Temple-Led Team: COVID containment measures in Philly associated with rise in gun violence
A team led by Dr. Jessica H. Beard, Assistant Professor of Surgery and Director of Trauma Research at the Lewis Katz School of Medicine at Temple University, sought to determine the magnitude of Philadelphia's increase in firearm violence during the COVID-19 pandemic. They also aimed to understand potential causes of the increase by trying to pinpoint when the increase occurred. (2021-02-10)

Study finds U.S. first responders have mixed feelings about COVID-19 vaccine
Firefighters and emergency medical services workers are at high risk of exposure to COVID-19 while on the job and pose an additional risk of transmitting the virus to others. Although vaccines are a promising public health tool for reducing COVID-19 transmission, little has been known about the perceptions of the COVID-19 vaccine among first responders. (2021-02-10)

Peanut allergy affects even more U.S. adults than children
Peanut allergy affects at least 4.5 million adults in the U.S., many of whom report developing their first allergy symptoms during adulthood. Although three out of four Americans with peanut allergy are over 17 years old, peanut allergy is often considered a predominantly pediatric concern. There are currently no FDA-approved therapies for patients with adult-onset food allergy. (2021-02-09)

New timeline of deadliest California wildfire could guide lifesaving research and action
What made the Camp Fire so devastating? And what lessons can we learn to prevent another disaster of this scale? Researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have begun to answer these questions by investigating the conditions leading up to the fire and meticulously reconstructing the sequence of events describing the first 24 hours of its progression. (2021-02-08)

Findings of study comparing analgesics in acute post-trauma pain
The combination of a high?dose NSAID with paracetamol does not increase the analgesic effect compared to paracetamol alone. Researchers also found that paracetamol alone is superior to high?dose NSAID alone for posttraumatic extremity pain. (2021-02-08)

Help for borderline personality disorder
Borderline Personality Disorder, or BPD, is the most common personality disorder in Australia, affecting up to 5% of the population at some stage, and Flinders University researchers warn more needs to be done to meet this high consumer needs. A new study in the Journal of Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing (Wiley) describes how people with BPD are becoming more knowledgeable about the disorder and available treatments, but may find it difficult to find evidence-based help for their symptoms. (2021-02-04)

Personalized screening to identify teens with high suicide risk
Researchers have developed a personalized system to better detect suicidal youths. (2021-02-03)

Computerized adaptive screener may help identify youth at risk for suicide
Researchers funded by NIMH have developed a computerized adaptive screener to identify youth at risk for attempting suicide. The screener, called the computerized adaptive screen for suicidal youth, consists of 11 questions on average and correctly identified 82.4% of youth who went on to attempt suicide in the three months following screening. The results suggest this screener could serve as an easy-to-use way for providers to detect youth suicide risk in emergency department settings. (2021-02-03)

Child head injury guidelines created
Australia's and New Zealand's first set of clinical guidelines for children's head injuries has been created. (2021-02-02)

Lack of ICU beds tied to thousands of excess COVID-19 deaths, Yale study finds
New Haven, Conn. --A new study by Yale researchers found a significant association between the availability of hospital resources -- particularly ICU beds -- and patient mortality during the early weeks of the COVID-19 pandemic. (2021-02-02)

Care delivery, cost reduction and quality improvement at heart of improving access to care
The American College of Cardiology's Cardiovascular Summit will feature several poster presentations on care delivery, cost reduction and quality improvement that offer innovative concepts to combat access to care, especially during the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic and as the broader health care system works to improve health equity. Research examines the rapid adoption of virtual outpatient care, enabling rural primary care teams to improve cardiovascular health and optimizing emergency room use after clinic hours. (2021-02-01)

New research looks at teen bariatric surgery outcomes by age
Researchers at Children's Hospital Colorado have found that both younger and older adolescents have similar weight loss, resolution of high blood pressure and high cholesterol, nutritional impacts and improvement in quality of life after bariatric surgery. These results strongly indicate that, when working with adolescents with severe obesity, age alone should not dissuade providers and patients from pursuing surgery when medically indicated. (2021-02-01)

Trauma surgeons and emergency surgeons positively impact patient satisfaction
A large study has found that effective and meaningful physician communication is a more important contributor to the overall satisfaction of trauma patients and those having emergency surgery than it is for patients admitted to the hospital for medical reasons or for elective procedures. (2021-01-29)

Racial, ethnic differences in diagnostic imaging at children's hospitals emergency departments
Researchers examined if the use of diagnostic imaging for children receiving care in pediatric emergency departments in the United States differs by race and ethnicity. (2021-01-29)

Enhanced recovery efforts for cesarean delivery reduce need for opioids by 80%
In a retrospective analysis of cesarean deliveries from 2015 through 2020, doctors from the Colorado Fetal Care Center at Children's Hospital Colorado found that using a wound infusion pump in combination with enhanced recovery efforts like removing urinary catheters earlier and walking around the same day of surgery can reduce opioid use by more than 80%. Also notable, researchers found a third of patients never took a single narcotic pain pill after cesarean delivery. (2021-01-28)

Nearly one in four families hesitant to take their child to ER during COVID-19 pandemic
During the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic, nearly one in four families responded that they would be unlikely to bring their child to the Emergency Department if they had an emergency condition, according to a survey from Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago published in the journal Academic Emergency Medicine. (2021-01-25)

In ED patients with chest and abdominal pain, care delivered by physicians and APPs is si
In patients matched on complexity and acuity presenting to the emergency department with chest pain and abdominal pain, the care delivered by advanced practice providers (APPs) and emergency physicians is largely similar with respect to diagnostic test ordering and admission decisions. (2021-01-25)

Rescuers at risk: emergency personnel face trauma and post traumatic stress symptoms
Researchers at the University of Bern's Hospital of Psychiatry have for the first time, demonstrated varying levels of post-traumatic stress symptoms (PTSS) in emergency personnel and rescue workers, with emergency department and psychiatry department staff demonstrating the highest levels of PTSS, suicidal thoughts and dysfunctional coping strategies. The study highlights the urgent need for job-specific training to improve emergency workers' quality of life and ability to cope with work-related trauma. (2021-01-19)

Youths with mood disorders who use marijuana at higher risk of death, self-harm
Youths with mood disorders who use and abuse cannabis (marijuana) have a higher risk for self-harm, death by all causes and death by unintentional overdose and homicide, according to research led by The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center and The Ohio State University College of Medicine. (2021-01-19)

Illinois researchers publish article describing Illinois RapidVent Emergency Ventilator
The design, testing, and validation of the Illinois RapidVent emergency ventilator has been published in the journal Plos One. The article, ''Emergency Ventilator for COVID-19,'' by University of Illinois Urbana researchers, is the first of its kind to report such details about an emergency ventilator that was designed, prototyped, and tested at the start of the COVID-19 pandemic in 2020. (2021-01-15)

Age matters in identifying maltreatment in infants and young children with fractures
Among children who were not in an independently verified incident, evaluation for child abuse should be done by specialty consultation in children aged less than three-years old presenting with rib fractures and children aged less than 18-months presenting with humeral or femoral fractures. (2021-01-13)

Survey finds Americans may delay medical appointments, emergency care during pandemic
A new national survey by the Orlando Health Heart & Vascular Institute finds many Americans would delay doctor's appointments and even emergency care when COVID-19 rates are high. The survey found 67 percent of Americans are more concerned about going to medical appointments when COVID-19 rates are high in their area and nearly three in five (57 percent) are hesitant to go to the hospital even for an emergency. (2021-01-12)

More than half of COVID-19 health care workers at risk for mental health problems
A new study, led by University of Utah Health scientists, suggests more than half of doctors, nurses, and emergency responders involved in COVID-19 care could be at risk for one or more mental health problems, including acute traumatic stress, depression, anxiety, problematic alcohol use, and insomnia. The researchers found that the risk of these mental health conditions was comparable to rates observed during natural disasters, such as 9/11 and Hurricane Katrina. (2021-01-12)

Gene therapy strategy found effective in mouse model of hereditary disease TSC
Patients with a genetic disorder called tuberous sclerosis complex have noncancerous tumors growing in numerous organs, and their treatment options are limited. A gene therapy strategy effectively treated mice that express one of the mutated genes that cause the disease. (2021-01-08)

Significant number of patients with sudden loss of consciousness need pre-hospital critical care
Research from life-saving charity Air Ambulance Kent Surrey Sussex (KSS) in partnership with the University of Surrey has shown the benefits of dispatching HEMS to patients with a sudden, unexplained LOC of medical origin and a high prevalence of acute neurological pathology. (2021-01-07)

Protein that can be toxic in the heart and nerves may help prevent Alzheimer's
A protein that wreaks havoc in the nerves and heart when it clumps together can prevent the formation of toxic protein clumps associated with Alzheimer's disease, a new study led by a UT Southwestern researcher shows. The findings, published recently in the Journal of Biological Chemistry, could lead to new treatments for this brain-ravaging condition, which currently has no truly effective therapies and no cure. (2021-01-07)

School nutrition professionals' employee safety experiences during onset of the COVID-19 pandemic
A new study in the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior, published by Elsevier, explores real-time personal and employee safety experiences and perspectives of school nutrition professionals ranging from frontline staff to state leadership across the United States during the early weeks of the coronavirus pandemic. (2021-01-07)

Neurologists say there is no medical justification for police use of neck restraints
A number of Americans have died during encounters with police officers who used chokeholds and other forms of neck restraint. Neurologist argue that some police departments justify use of these tactics with misleading language and that the use of neck restraints has no medical justification. (2020-12-28)

Scientists find out how nutrition affects the recovery of patients after cardiac surgery
Scientists from St Petersburg University have found out how eating habits of patients affect their recovery after cardiac surgery. People with valvular heart disease have appeared to be at risk. (2020-12-25)

Chest pain risk assessment may reduce treatment disparities
The use of a standardized tool for assessing the risk of serious outcomes in patients with chest pain was associated with women at high risk receiving comparable care to men, according to new research published in the Annals of Emergency Medicine. Care received by women at low and intermediate risk was consistent with current clinical recommendations. Men received more stress testing and were more likely to be hospitalized than women. (2020-12-23)

Scientists identify new gene involved in autism spectrum disorder
UT Southwestern scientists have adapted a classic research technique called forward genetics to identify new genes involved in autism spectrum disorder (ASD). In a study published this week in eLife, the researchers used this approach in mice to find one such gene called KDM5A. (2020-12-23)

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