Current Emergency Department News and Events | Page 2

Current Emergency Department News and Events, Emergency Department News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Viewed
Page 2 of 25 | 1000 Results
Research shows disparities in how communities respond to cardiac arrest
Black neighborhoods had a significantly lower rate of bystander automated external defibrillator (AED) use relative to non-Hispanic/Latino white communities, according to researchers at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth). (2020-12-09)

What are schools doing to feed students during COVID-19-related closures?
As schools across the United States are grappling with remote and hybrid learning due to the COVID-19 pandemic, a new study in the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior, published by Elsevier, investigates the initial responses of child nutrition administrative agencies in all 50 US states and the District of Columbia (DC), five US territories, and the US Department of Interior Bureau of Indian Education (BIE). (2020-12-08)

329 people injured by firearms in US each day, but for every death, 2 survive
Researchers examine trends in fatal and nonfatal firearm injuries to inform prevention strategies, finding that twice as many people who are shot survive than die. (2020-12-07)

Pediatric ER saw steep drop in asthma visits during spring COVID-19 lockdown
A new study published online in the Annals of the American Thoracic Society discusses a steep drop off from prior years in asthma-related emergency department (ED) visits at Boston Children's Hospital during the spring 2020 COVID-19 surge and lockdown. (2020-12-04)

Kidney injury in diabetic ketoacidosis linked to brain injury
Researchers have identified factors that make children with diabetic ketoacidosis more likely to experience acute kidney injury. Analyzing data from a large, multicenter clinical trial, the researchers also found that children who experience acute kidney injury are more likely to also experience subtle cognitive impairment and demonstrate lower IQ scores, suggesting a pattern of multiple organ injury. (2020-12-04)

COVID-19 pandemic responsible for decrease in hepatitis C testing
New research from Boston Medical Center finds that the COVID-19 emergency systemic changes made to decrease in-person visits during the pandemic have led to a decrease in hospital-wide Hepatitis C (HCV) testing by 50 percent, and a reduction in new HCV diagnoses by more than 60 percent. (2020-12-04)

After shipping, pallets pose big risk to public, cause many accidents, injuries
Shipping pallets -- often used as display platforms in retail settings or seen as raw material for household projects -- were responsible for sending more than 30,000 people to the emergency rooms of U.S. hospitals over a recent five-year period, according to a new study. (2020-12-02)

Forearm fractures may signal intimate partner violence
Up to one-third of adult women who sustain a non-displaced fracture to the ulna bone of the forearm may be victims of intimate partner violence, according to a study being presented at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA). The findings underscore the need to screen for intimate partner violence in women with these types of injuries, researchers said. (2020-11-30)

Study explores how telemedicine may ease ER overcrowding
Researchers led by Dr. Shujing Sun at UT Dallas found that the adoption of telemedicine in the emergency room significantly shortened average length of stay and wait time. (2020-11-30)

Linking medically complex children's outpatient team with hospitalists improved care
When medically complex children are hospitalized, linking hospitalists to their regular outpatient providers through an inpatient consultation service were more likely to improve outcomes, according to researchers at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth). (2020-11-30)

Emergency department doctors ask: "Where did all the patients go?"
During the early days of the COVID-19 pandemic in New England, emergency department visits for medical emergencies - including psychiatric problems, trauma and heart attacks - declined by nearly a third, raising concerns among clinicians that critically ill patients were not seeking the care they needed for fear of coronavirus infection. (2020-11-30)

Doctors report unusual case of patient 'mirror writing' in the emergency room
In new research presented at Euroanaesthesia (the annual meeting of the European Society of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care [ESAIC]), doctors report a highly unusual case of a right-handed patient performing unconscious 'mirror-writing' with her left hand while in the midst of having epileptic seizures in the emergency room. (2020-11-27)

How lockdown may lead to "avoidable harm" for the health of under 16s
Decreases in hospital attendances and admissions amid fears of COVID-19 may result in avoidable harm for under 16s say researchers. Following lockdown, they found ''a striking decrease'' in the number of children and young people attending the Paediatric Emergency Department at Yale New Haven Children's Hospital in the US and the Royal Manchester Children's Hospital in the UK. The researchers said: ''Children and adolescents presenting later on in their illness are more likely to have a negative outcome.'' (2020-11-27)

Study shows minimal impact of APPs on ED productivity, flow, safety, patient experience
Advanced practice providers (APPs) have lower productivity compared with emergency department physicians, seeing fewer and less complex patients and generating less relative value units per hour, and having no apparent impact on patient satisfaction and safety metrics. (2020-11-25)

Study characterizes suspected COVID-19 infections in emergency departments in the UK
Among patients reporting to hospital emergency departments (EDs) with suspected COVID-19 infection, important differences in symptoms and outcome exist based on age, sex and ethnicity, according to a new study published this week in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Steve Goodacre of the University of Sheffield, UK, and colleagues. (2020-11-25)

Magnet swallowing by children after changes in federal regulations
Researchers looked at changes in the rates of emergency department visits for children who swallowed small high-powered magnets over a period of change in federal regulations of these magnets. (2020-11-24)

Risk of death high among those with alcohol-related visits to ED: CMAJ study
The risk of death is high for people who visit the emergency department (ED) for alcohol use, and the risk increases with frequency, according to a new study in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal) (2020-11-23)

Deep learning in the emergency department
Harnessing the power of deep learning leads to better predictions of patient admissions and flow in emergency departments (2020-11-22)

Adverse childhood experiences and at-risk drinking, cannabis, and illicit drug use
New research from the Prevention Research Center of the Pacific Institute for Research and Evaluation suggests that adverse childhood experiences, often referred to as child maltreatment, are associated with increased odds of substance use among women urban Emergency Department patients. (2020-11-22)

New tool helps predict outcomes for COVID-19
A study published in the American Journal of Emergency Medicine this month reports on an assessment tool developed by Kaiser Permanente researchers and physicians that helps ensure patients get the right care, when they need it, by accurately predicting the probability that patients with COVID-19 symptoms will experience severe disease or even death. (2020-11-20)

Social isolation during COVID-19 pandemic linked with high blood pressure
Lockdown due to the COVID-19 pandemic is associated with an increase in high blood pressure among patients admitted to emergency. That's the finding of a study presented at the 46th Argentine Congress of Cardiology (SAC). SAC 2020 is a virtual meeting during 19 to 21 November. Faculty from the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) will participate in joint scientific sessions with the Argentine Society of Cardiology as part of the ESC Global Activities programme. (2020-11-19)

DeepER tool uses deep learning to better allocate emergency services
Researchers at Binghamton University, State University of New York has used deep-learning techniques to analyze statistics on emergencies in NYC to suggest improved public safety through re-allocation of resources. (2020-11-19)

Minorities benefit less from regionalizing heart attack care
California's Black and Hispanic communities may be falling further behind whites in the quality of care they receive for heart attacks, despite recent medical efforts aimed at improving the standards of care for these populations, according to a new study led by researchers at UC San Francisco. (2020-11-16)

Study: Respiratory failure in COVID-19 usually not driven by cytokine storm
A study by researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and St. Jude Children's Research Hospital in Memphis showed that, contrary to expectation, most people with severe COVID-19 do not suffer from unbridled inflammation. The findings suggest that anti-inflammatory therapies may not be helpful for most COVID-19 patients. (2020-11-13)

Inclusion of patient headshots in electronic health records decreases order errors
Analysis of the millions of orders placed for participating patients over a two-year span showed the rate of wrong patient order entry to be 35 percent lower for patients whose photos were included in their EHR. (2020-11-13)

UNC Charlotte study finds success in Charlotte-Mecklenburg's efforts to end homelessness
A new comprehensive study from UNC Charlotte's Urban Institute, College of Health and Human Services and School of Social Work shows an effective approach to ending chronic homelessness that helps those in need and benefits communities. The Housing First Charlotte-Mecklenburg initiative, an innovative multi-sector collaboration that's been working to end chronic homelessness in Charlotte for five years, has placed more than 1,000 people in the Charlotte community in stable housing. (2020-11-12)

Calls to city 311 lines can predict opioid overdose hotspots
Service requests to city non-emergency telephone lines can help identify 'hotspots' for opioid use and overdoses, a study in Columbus found. Researchers found that calls to the 311 line - used in many cities across the United States to report non-emergency issues - tracked closely to places and times in Columbus in which opioid overdose events were on the rise. (2020-11-11)

EMS dispatches for asthma greatly reduced after expanded access to health insurance
The expansion of health insurance in New York City under the Affordable Care Act resulted in a significant reduction in the dispatch of ambulances for asthma emergencies, a study by Massachusetts General Hospital has found. Researchers suggest that the reason for this decline is improved access to outpatient management of asthma. The finding has major implications for the broader public health system. (2020-11-11)

Six ways primary care "medical homes" are lowering health care spending
New analysis of 394 U.S. primary care practices identifies the aspects of care delivery that are associated with lower health care spending and lower utilization of emergency care and hospital admissions. (2020-11-10)

New study reveals disturbing surge in violent injuries during stay-at-home orders
The social isolation brought on by stay-at-home orders (SAHO) issued in the early phase of the Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic may have a deadly and dangerous side effect: an increase in intentional penetrating injuries, especially firearm violence, that has remained at high levels even as stay-at-home orders have subsided and as COVID-19 cases are on an upswing. (2020-11-09)

Tokyo's voluntary standstill may have stopped COVID-19 in its tracks
Research shows that Japan's noncompulsory state of emergency generally succeeded in reducing human movement. A study from The University of Tokyo Institute of Industrial Science used mobile phone location data for January-April 2020 to record and plot movement of people in metro Tokyo during the emergence and first wave of COVID-19. They found a movement reduction of over 50%, which in turn limited social contact and slowed infection spread. (2020-11-05)

ACA results in fewer low-income uninsured, but non-urgent ER visits haven't changed
Since the Affordable Care Act's (ACA) Medicaid expansion program went into effect 10 years ago, the U.S. has seen a larger reduction in the number of uninsured low-income, rural residents, compared to their urban contemporaries. But the likelihood of repeated visits to emergency rooms for non-urgent reasons has not decreased. (2020-11-05)

Physician advocates screening teen emergency room patients for sexually transmitted infections
Of the 20 million cases of sexually transmitted infections each year 10 million occur among adolescents and young adults. Screening teens and young patients who visit the emergency room for other acute care issues for sexually transmitted infections can help combat future health complications. (2020-11-04)

Emergency care doctors not getting sufficient 'down time', new study shows
A survey of more than 4,000 UK emergency care doctors has shown that they need more support to recover from work pressures between shifts. (2020-11-02)

Study suggests increased risk of restraint use in black patients in the emergency setting
A study published in the most recent issue of Academic Emergency Medicine (AEM) journal showed an increased risk of restraint use in Black patients compared with white patients in the emergency setting. The risk was not increased in other races or Hispanic/Latino ethnicity. (2020-11-02)

Mobile smartphone technology is associated with better clinical outcomes for OHCA
Mobile smartphone technology can accelerate first responder dispatch and may be instrumental to improving out?of?hospital cardiac arrest (OCHA) survival. (2020-10-30)

Radical diagnostic could save millions of people at risk of dying from blood loss
Engineers at Monash University in Australia have developed a fast, portable and cheap diagnostic that can help deliver urgent treatment to people at risk of dying from rapid blood loss. This portable diagnostic measures fibrinogen concentration in blood. (2020-10-29)

Study shows COVID-19 risk to firefighters and emergency medical workers in New York City
Firefighters and emergency medical workers in New York City were 15 times more likely to be infected during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic compared to the general public, according to a study published in ERJ Open Research. (2020-10-29)

Study documents racial differences in US hospice use and end-of-life care preferences
In a new medical records analysis of racial disparities in end-of-life care, researchers at Johns Hopkins Medicine and three collaborating institutions report that Black patients voluntarily seek substantially more intensive treatment in the last six months of life, while white patients more often choose hospice services. (2020-10-28)

Researchers present findings on role of google search early in COVID-19 pandemic
A team from the George Washington University will present at the American College of Emergency Physicians annual conference, on results of their study exploring the role of Google searches during the early phase of the COVID-19 pandemic in the United States. (2020-10-26)

Page 2 of 25 | 1000 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.