Nav: Home

Current Emotions News and Events

Current Emotions News and Events, Emotions News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Viewed
Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
Brazilian youth's important role in fight against climate change - study
Marginalised young people in Brazilian cities can play an important role in responding to the threat of climate change, but youth engagement needs to be both 'playful' and take youth 'seriously' to support them in expressing their full potential in bringing about local change according to a new study. (2020-10-26)
Hot-button words trigger conservatives and liberals differently
Researchers have linked a brain region to what they call neural polarization, offering a glimpse into the partisan brain in the weeks leading up to what is arguably the most consequential U.S. presidential election in modern history. (2020-10-20)
Newborn brains lack maturity to process emotions as adults do
Humans aren't born with mature brain circuitry that attaches emotions to the things they see or hear in their environment, a new study shows. (2020-10-19)
Malice leaves a nasty smell
Unhealthy behaviours trigger moral judgments that are similar to the basic emotions that contribute to our ability to survive. (2020-10-16)
Stay in touch with your emotions to reduce pandemic-induced stress
The coronavirus has ushered in a lot of stress. A team of psychologists at the University of Iowa say people can reduce stress by identifying their emotions and taking mindful action to address them. (2020-10-14)
Smartphone surveys find a connection between daily spiritual experiences and well-being
Using smartphone check-ins twice a day for two weeks, sociologists in a national study have found a link between individuals' daily spiritual experiences and overall well-being, say researchers from Baylor University and Harvard University. (2020-10-02)
VA Boston and BU researchers streamline PTSD diagnosis with machine learning
Now, researchers from the VA Boston Healthcare System and the Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) have used machine learning to explore streamlining the ''gold standard'' diagnostic tool for PTSD. (2020-09-29)
Friendly interactions with Chinese people reduced COVID-19 prejudice
A new study finds that friendly interactions with Chinese people reduced Covid-19 prejudice as the virus hit the UK back in February. (2020-09-27)
COVID-19 spurs anxious, upsetting dreams
The anxiety, stress and worry brought on by COVID-19 is not limited to daytime hours. (2020-09-25)
Loving-kindness meditation will make you happier
Researchers from HSE University compared the effect of two meditation practices - loving-kindness meditation (LKM) and compassion meditation (CM). (2020-09-24)
Talking alone: Researchers use artificial intelligence tools to predict loneliness
A team led by researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine has used artificial intelligence technologies to analyze natural language patterns to discern degrees of loneliness in older adults. (2020-09-24)
What new research reveals about rude workplace emails
With the advent of the coronavirus pandemic and remote work on the rise, the sheer volume of email exchanges has skyrocketed. (2020-09-24)
When bots do the negotiating, humans more likely to engage in deceptive techniques
Researchers found that whether humans would embrace a range of deceptive and sneaky negotiating techniques was dependent both on the humans' prior negotiating experience in negotiating as well as whether virtual agents where employed to negotiate on their behalf. (2020-09-22)
'Awe walks' boost emotional well-being
A regular dose of awe is a simple way to boost healthy 'prosocial' emotions such as compassion and gratitude, according to a new study by researchers at the UC San Francisco Memory and Aging Center (MAC) and the Global Brain Health Institute (GBHI) -- a partnership between UCSF and Trinity College Dublin to improve brain health worldwide. (2020-09-21)
People react better to both negative and positive events with more sleep
New research from UBC finds that after a night of shorter sleep, people react more emotionally to stressful events the next day--and they don't find as much joy in the good things. (2020-09-15)
Study provides insights on bouncing back from job loss
Stress associated with job loss can have a host of negative effects on individuals that may hinder their ability to become re-employed. (2020-09-10)
Colors evoke similar feelings around the world
People all over the world associate colors with emotions. In fact, people from different parts of the world often associate the same colors with the same emotions. (2020-09-10)
Emotion vocabulary reflects state of well-being, study suggests
The vast way in which you describe your emotions can reveal your lived experience and wellness status. (2020-09-10)
Understanding the psychological aspects of the COVID-19 pandemic
Research at SMU to understand the psychological aspects of COVID-19 points to two main areas: message framing and emotion-regulation. (2020-09-01)
Analysis of ancient Mesoamerican sculptures supports universality of emotional expressions
An analysis of facial expressions in ancient Mesoamerican sculptures finds that some emotions expressed in these artworks match the emotions that modern US participants would anticipate for each discernible context, including elation, sadness, pain, anger, and determination or strain. (2020-08-19)
Machine learning, meet human emotions: How to help a computer monitor your mental state
An international team of scientists has tested state-of-the-art machine learning algorithms for the challenging tasks of determining the mental workload and affective states of a human brain. (2020-08-19)
Recalling memories from a third-person perspective changes how our brain processes them
Adopting a third-person, observer point of view when recalling your past activates different parts of your brain than recalling a memory seen through your own eyes, according to a new paper. (2020-08-13)
Childhood connection to nature has many benefits but is not universally positive, finds review
A literature review by Dr Louise Chawla, Professor Emerita at the University of Colorado, finds that children are happier and more likely to protect the natural world when they have a greater connection to it, but this connection is complex and can also generate negative emotions linked to issues like climate change. (2020-08-06)
Headline news: Botox injections may lessen depression
By analyzing the FDA database of adverse drug effects, UC San Diego researchers discovered that people who received Botox injections -- not just in the forehead -- reported depression significantly less often than patients undergoing different treatments for the same conditions. (2020-07-30)
Looking up to the Joneses: Consequences of the perceptions of white wealth
In a pair of studies, social psychologists propose that widespread perceptions that white people are wealthy, and that Black people are poor, may shape the way people experience their own status. (2020-07-30)
Increased attention to sad faces predicts depression risk in teenagers
Teenagers who tend to pay more attention to sad faces are more likely to develop depression, but specifically within the context of stress, according to new research from Binghamton University, State University of New York. (2020-07-28)
Humanizing hotel brands during COVID-19 could encourage tourists to return
Hotels should build an emotional attachment with tourists when communicating during crises such as the COVID-19 pandemic if they are to encourage them to return, according to new research. (2020-07-23)
New UBC study reveals older adults coped with pandemic best
Adults aged 60 and up have fared better emotionally compared to younger adults (18-39) and middle-aged adults (40-59) amid the COVID-19 pandemic, according to new UBC research published recently in the Journal of Gerontology: Psychological Sciences. (2020-07-22)
Global sentiments towards COVID-19 shifts from fear to anger
The fear that people developed at the start of the COVID-19 outbreak has given way to anger over the course of the pandemic, a study of global sentiments led by NTU Singapore has found. (2020-07-15)
Why are memories attached to emotions so strong?
Multiple neurons in the brain must fire in synchrony to create persistent memories tied to intense emotions, new research from Columbia neuroscientists has found. (2020-07-13)
Trust me if you can
Each year, wind turbines are responsible for the death of hundreds of thousands of airborne animals such as bats. (2020-07-09)
Insufficient sleep harms children's mental health
Poor sleep harms children's mental health and emotional stability according to a new study published by University of Houston professor of psychology and director of the Sleep and Anxiety Center of Houston, Candice Alfano. (2020-07-07)
Time to get real on the power of positive thinking -- new study
Positive thinking has long been extolled as the route to happiness, but it might be time to ditch the self-help books after a new study shows that realists enjoy a greater sense of long-term wellbeing than optimists. (2020-07-06)
Pet dogs may improve social-emotional development in young children
Young children from dog-owning households have better social and emotional wellbeing than children from households who do not own a dog, suggests research published in the journal Pediatric Research. (2020-07-05)
From age 8 we spontaneously link vocal to facial emotion
Do children have to wait until age 8 to recognize -- spontaneously and without instructions -- the same emotion of happiness or anger depending on whether it is expressed by a voice or on a face? (2020-06-30)
Responses to cyberbullying
It is well-known that victims of bullying can have higher risks of future health and social problems. (2020-06-29)
A new theory about political polarization
A new model of opinion formation shows how the extent to which people like or dislike each other affects their political views -- and vice versa. (2020-06-29)
Tennis: Losers move their heads more often than winners
Those sudden tantrums displayed on court by former US tennis player John McEnroe are legendary - but so too are those of Nick Kyrgios, Alexander Zverev, Serena Williams and Co. (2020-06-29)
We feel connected when we move together in time with music
Go dancing! A new study conduted at Center for Music in the Brain at Aarhus University, Denmark, suggest that then moving together with music, synchronous movements between individuals increase social closeness. (2020-06-26)
How to have a better day during the pandemic
Many think they're doing good by texting with others to stay connected while physically distancing during the pandemic, but a national survey by the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill shows more meaningful connections happen when people can hear or see the person they're interacting with. (2020-06-26)
Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   

Trending Science News

Current Coronavirus (COVID-19) News

Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2020.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Listen Again: The Power Of Spaces
How do spaces shape the human experience? In what ways do our rooms, homes, and buildings give us meaning and purpose? This hour, TED speakers explore the power of the spaces we make and inhabit. Guests include architect Michael Murphy, musician David Byrne, artist Es Devlin, and architect Siamak Hariri.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#576 Science Communication in Creative Places
When you think of science communication, you might think of TED talks or museum talks or video talks, or... people giving lectures. It's a lot of people talking. But there's more to sci comm than that. This week host Bethany Brookshire talks to three people who have looked at science communication in places you might not expect it. We'll speak with Mauna Dasari, a graduate student at Notre Dame, about making mammals into a March Madness match. We'll talk with Sarah Garner, director of the Pathologists Assistant Program at Tulane University School of Medicine, who takes pathology instruction out of...
Now Playing: Radiolab

What If?
There's plenty of speculation about what Donald Trump might do in the wake of the election. Would he dispute the results if he loses? Would he simply refuse to leave office, or even try to use the military to maintain control? Last summer, Rosa Brooks got together a team of experts and political operatives from both sides of the aisle to ask a slightly different question. Rather than arguing about whether he'd do those things, they dug into what exactly would happen if he did. Part war game part choose your own adventure, Rosa's Transition Integrity Project doesn't give us any predictions, and it isn't a referendum on Trump. Instead, it's a deeply illuminating stress test on our laws, our institutions, and on the commitment to democracy written into the constitution. This episode was reported by Bethel Habte, with help from Tracie Hunte, and produced by Bethel Habte. Jeremy Bloom provided original music. Support Radiolab by becoming a member today at Radiolab.org/donate.     You can read The Transition Integrity Project's report here.