Current Employees News and Events

Current Employees News and Events, Employees News Articles.
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Star employees get most of the credit - and blame
Working with a ''star'' employee - someone who demonstrates exceptional performance and enjoys broad visibility relative to industry peers - offers both risks and rewards, according to new research from the Cornell University's ILR School. (2021-02-16)

Learn what you live? Study finds watching others can reduce decision bias
New research finds first evidence that watching and learning from others can help reduce bias and improve decision-making. In business, the results could help improve hiring practices or increase cost savings. (2021-02-11)

In-depth analysis identifies causes and mitigation efforts in COVID-19 cluster
As part of the response to the cluster, Brigham researchers also conducted a case-control study and whole-genome sequencing to identify factors that may have been involved in the virus's spread as well as the most likely chain of transmission. The lessons gleaned from their data have helped inform infection control efforts. (2021-02-08)

Study finds consensus for arming school resource officers, division on arming teachers and other staff
A new study examined public support for arming school employees. The study found consensus for arming school resource officers, but division over whether to arm teachers and nonteaching staff. The research has clear implications for policy, including the possibility that support for arming school staff may diminish over time as young people (who are less supportive) make up a larger share of voters. (2021-02-03)

Inspiring leadership, resilience and new challenges: The keys to efficient work teams
The COVID-19 pandemic has upended many parts of daily life, one of them being our work life. Research carried out by the Universitat Oberta de Catalunya (UOC) has studied the factors that help make efficient work teams. The explanation is multidimensional and multilevel. (2021-02-02)

Skoltech imaging resources used in international experiment with new photocatalysts
Skoltech researchers helped their colleagues from Japan, Germany, the United States, and China study the crystal structure and optical properties of a new class of two-dimensional compounds, which can be used as effective visible-light-responsive photocatalysts for energy and chemical conversion. They used the Advanced Imaging Core Facility equipment for imaging and structural analysis. (2021-02-01)

Entrepreneurs benefit more from emotional intelligence than other competencies, such as IQ
Running a successful business has its challenges, but the COVID-19 pandemic has required many owners to pivot and look for new ways to operate profitably while keeping employees and consumers safe. Research from the Indiana University Kelley School of Business found that emotional intelligence - the ability to understand, use and manage emotions to relieve stress - may be more vital to a business' survival than previously thought. (2021-01-28)

Baylor study: Management without morals can lead to employees' unethical behavior
An organization that projects an ethical face but whose managers fail to respond to internal ethical situations sends mixed messages to its employees, which can lead to a lack of employees' moral courage and an increase in unethical behavior, according to a study led by a Baylor University researcher. (2021-01-28)

Study reveals precarious employment on the rise long before COVID-19
A study led by a University of Illinois Chicago researcher uses a new approach to measure precarious, or low-quality, employment in the United States. And, according to those findings, precarious employment has increased 9% between 1988 and 2016. Precarious employment, or P.E., is defined as low-quality employment, which is often characterized by low wages, job insecurity and irregular hours, making employment risky and stressful for the worker. (2021-01-27)

Hospital worker flu shots could mean fewer deaths
Research shows that state laws promoting flu vaccinations for hospital workers can substantially reduce the number of influenza-related deaths. (2021-01-26)

Marketing has major benefits for entrepreneurs in emerging markets, study shows
New research from Notre Dame shows marketers can help entrepreneurs in emerging markets grow their businesses, which in turn helps them to improve lives, sustain livelihoods, enhance overall living standards and strengthen societies. (2021-01-26)

Abusive bosses 'fake nice' instead of 'make nice'
Rather than take steps to genuinely repair damage caused by their abusive behavior, such as offering sincere apologies, many of the bosses in this study were more concerned about repairing their social images. (2021-01-22)

Lack of managers keeps India's businesses small
In today's economy, American businesses often tap into professional management to grow, but most firms in India and other developing countries are family owned and often shun outside managers. A new study co-authored by Yale economist Michael Peters explores the effects that the absence of outside professional management has on India's businesses and the country's economy. (2021-01-14)

Common workplace interactions can trigger suicidal thoughts for employees with mood disorders
Perceived low-grade forms of workplace mistreatment, such as avoiding eye contact or excluding a coworker from conversation, can amplify suicidal thoughts in employees with mood disorders, based on a West Virginia University study. (2021-01-14)

Study finds NRA stakeholders conflicted in wake of shootings
A recent study finds that, in the wake of a mass shooting, National Rifle Association (NRA) employees, donors and volunteers had extremely mixed emotions about the organization - reporting higher levels of both positive and negative feelings about the NRA, as compared to people with no NRA affiliation. (2021-01-12)

Boomerang performance is on par with internal employees who never left the firm, new paper finds
A new paper contrasts the outcomes for boomerang employees with those of internally promoted employees to help firms determine whether to invest in talent management strategies that include boomerang rehiring or to focus on internal strategies that develop current employees. (2021-01-12)

For the right employees, even standard information technology can spur creativity
In a money-saving revelation for organizations inclined to invest in specialized information technology to support the process of idea generation, new research suggests that even non-specialized, everyday organizational IT can encourage employees' creativity. (2021-01-07)

Hotels that promote women perceived as fairer, less discriminatory
New research led by the University of Houston Conrad N. Hilton College of Hotel and Restaurant Management suggests hotel companies that promote a woman over an equally qualified man are perceived as fairer and less discriminatory, creating a stronger organizational culture and higher financial performance. (2021-01-05)

Study published on the well-being of small business workers during COVID-19
This study, published in the Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, examined whether safety and health climates were related to employee well-being during the COVID-19 pandemic in a sample of small businesses. (2020-12-21)

Ignoring CDC guidelines leads to fear, anger among employees
Companies not following the recommended safety protocols set by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention during the COVID-19 pandemic could have a significant impact on employee trust, loyalty and overall commitment, according to a new study. (2020-12-16)

Flexible working time as an opportunity to save costs and increase productivity
The Covid-19 pandemic has turned flexible working arrangements a new reality, but differences in employees' preferences and the financial implications for companies still require unravelling. (2020-12-15)

Proportionally more male bosses negative toward depression
A higher proportion of male than of female managers have negative attitudes toward depression, a University of Gothenburg study shows. The more senior the managerial positions, the bigger the share of men with negative attitudes; the same, moreover, applies to women in senior managerial jobs. (2020-12-14)

A biased evaluation of employees' performance can be useful for employers
In assessing an employee's performance, employers often listen to his immediate supervisor or colleagues, and these opinions can be highly subjective. Sergey Stepanov, an economist from HSE University, has shown that biased evaluations can actually benefit employers. An article substantiating this finding was published in the Journal of Economic Behavior and Organization. (2020-12-10)

Bosses need appreciation, too
'Tis the season to be grateful, even for your boss, according to a recent A new study suggests that when supervisors feel appreciated, it gives them a boost of energy and optimism. In the end, that's good for employees and the organization's bottom line. (2020-12-10)

Healthcare workers 7 times as likely to have severe COVID-19 as other workers
Healthcare workers are 7 times as likely to have severe COVID-19 infection as those with other types of 'non-essential' jobs, finds research focusing on the first UK-wide lockdown and published online in the journal Occupational & Environmental Medicine. (2020-12-08)

Unique access: Doctors, nurses in COVID-19 epicenter aided by proactive personality
A new study from Notre Dame offers the first examination of proactive personality in times of immediate response to a crisis -- the early days of the COVID-19 pandemic at a hospital in Wuhan, China, the epicenter of the coronavirus outbreak. (2020-11-11)

Burnout can exacerbate work stress, further promoting a vicious circle
Work stress and burnout are mutually reinforcing; surprisingly, the effect of work stress on burnout is much smaller than the effect of burnout on work stress. (2020-11-10)

You drive like a girl: Study shows gender bias in perceptions of ride-sharing performance
While digital brokerages provide a more efficient method for the exchange of goods and services and an improved way for consumers to voice their opinions about the quality of work they receive, bias and discrimination can emerge as part of the review process, according to Notre Dame research. (2020-11-09)

Coronavirus infection odds twice as high among Black, Latinx hospital workers
Support staff and Black and Latinx hospital employees with and without patient care responsibilities are at highest risk for SARS-CoV-2 infection in health care settings, a Rutgers study found. (2020-11-04)

High rate of symptomless COVID-19 infection among grocery store workers
Grocery store employees are likely to be at heightened risk of COVID-19 infection, with those in customer-facing roles 5 times as likely to test positive as their colleagues in other positions, suggests the first study of its kind, published in the journal Occupational & Environmental Medicine. (2020-10-29)

CU Denver study looks into the connection between religion and equal pay
Traci Sitzmann, an Associate Professor at the University of Colorado Denver Business School, and Elizabeth Campbell, an Assistant Professor at the University of Minnesota, provide empirical evidence and an explanation into why religion perpetuates the gender wage gap. (2020-10-28)

Couples share heart disease risk factors and behaviors
In 79 percent of couples, both people fell into the non-ideal category for cardiovascular health, with most sharing unhealthy diets and getting inadequate exercise. (2020-10-26)

How initiatives empowering employees can backfire
Strategies meant to motivate people in the workplace may have unintended consequences -- depending on who's in charge. Recent research from Michigan State University shows that empowerment initiatives aren't necessarily the answer for business leaders hoping to motivate their employees. (2020-10-20)

Research finds that blue-light glasses improve sleep and workday productivity
During the pandemic, the amount of screen time for many people working and learning from home as well as binge-watching TV has sharply increased. New research finds that wearing blue-light glasses just before sleeping can lead to a better night's sleep and contribute to a better day's work to follow. (2020-10-15)

NFL teams with critical mass of women executives have fewer football player arrests
The study from Syracuse University finds a link between fewer player arrests and having a critical mass of women (two or more) in front office positions, The authors theorize that this relationship results from positive changes to the organizational culture and improved decision making when two or more women serve on the top management team. The research is in-press at the Journal of Organizational Behavior. (2020-10-12)

Pandemic-related stress leads to less employee engagement
As COVID-19 cases surged this spring, the pandemic led some people more than others to ponder their own mortality. A new study in China and the United States suggests that these people were the ones who showed the highest levels of stress and the least engagement at work. But the research also uncovered a bright spot: The right kind of boss helped reduce stress and increase engagement in their workers who were anxious about COVID-19. (2020-10-12)

Black police officers disciplined disproportionately for misconduct, IU research finds
An examination of racial differences in the disciplining of police officers in three of the largest U.S. cities consistently found that Black officers were more frequently disciplined for misconduct than White officers, despite an essentially equal number of allegations being leveled. This included allegations of severe misconduct. (2020-10-12)

Some employees more likely to adhere to information security policies than others
Information security policies (ISP) that are not grounded in the realities of an employee's work responsibilities and priorities exposes organizations to higher risk for data breaches, according to new research from Binghamton University, State University of New York. (2020-10-06)

Reactions to perceived broken promises lead to workplace stress for police officers
Negative feelings resulting from perceived broken promises from employers within UK police forces are a major cause of workplace stress, according to new research at the University of Birmingham. (2020-10-05)

Has COVID-19 knocked us onto our backsides?
A group of Kent State University researchers sought to examine the impact of pandemic-related changes upon physical activity and sedentary behavior, specifically sitting, across the university population. (2020-10-05)

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