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New research explores how multinational firms can manage corruption
New research from Charles E. Stevens, associate professor of management in Lehigh's College of Business, shows multinational firms taking a new approach when dealing with corruption. Instead of engaging in corrupt activities or avoiding investments in countries where corruption is widespread, firms are managing corruption by promoting positive engagement with the host country. (2020-10-01)

Work bubbles can help businesses reopen while limiting risk of COVID-19 outbreaks
Creating ''work bubbles'' during the COVID-19 pandemic can help reduce the risk of company-wide outbreaks while helping essential businesses continue to function, as the example of Bombardier Aviation demonstrates in an analysis published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal) https://www.cmaj.ca/content/early/2020/09/29/cmaj.201582. (2020-09-30)

Hackers targeting companies that fake corporate responsibility
A new study found some hackers aren't in it for the money; they want to expose firms that engage in phony philanthropy. These hackers -- which include everyone from disgruntled employees to hacktivist groups -- can ''sniff out'' actions that only give the appearance of corporate social responsibility. (2020-09-30)

Buying emergency contraception is legal but not always easy at small, mom-and-pop pharmacies
Amie Ashcraft has studied the availability and accessibility of emergency contraception in West Virginia pharmacies. She and her research team found that chain pharmacies--like CVS and Walmart--were more likely than independent ones to keep emergency contraception in stock. (2020-09-29)

Covert tobacco industry marketing tactics exposed by former employees
Tobacco companies use covert marketing tactics and exploit loopholes in Australian tobacco control laws to promote their products despite current tobacco advertising bans, finds new research from University of Sydney and Cancer Council NSW. To circumvent current tobacco advertising, promotion and sponsorship (TAPS) laws in Australia, tobacco companies are incentivising retailers with cash payments, all-expenses paid holidays, exclusive parties and tickets to sporting events to drive tobacco sales. (2020-09-28)

Jindal school researchers examine COVID-19 impact on manufacturing
Two Jindal School faculty members found that manufacturing response to COVID-19 has been largely reactive and uncoordinated, and many firms' crisis communication plans do not include managing an infectious-disease outbreak. (2020-09-24)

Job security, finances strongly related to increased anxiety during pandemic
For people still employed during the COVID-19 pandemic, job insecurity and financial concern are associated with greater symptoms of depression and anxiety, according to findings from the UConn School of Nursing published recently in the Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, or JOEM. (2020-09-24)

COVID-19 infected workers return to work faster using time and symptom-based protocols
Recently, investigators assessed the experience of using a test-based protocol in over 1000 infected health care workers. (2020-09-24)

What new research reveals about rude workplace emails
With the advent of the coronavirus pandemic and remote work on the rise, the sheer volume of email exchanges has skyrocketed. Electronic communication is efficient, but it's also distant and detached, and often can be rude. (2020-09-24)

Study shows keeping gratitude journal reduces gossip, incivility in workplace
Gratitude interventions in the workplace can help employee well-being and managers can use these efforts to foster more respectful behavior in their teams. (2020-09-22)

The Phish scale: NIST's new tool helps IT staff see why users click on fraudulent emails
Researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have developed a new tool called the Phish Scale that could help organizations better train their employees to avoid a particularly dangerous form of cyber attack known as phishing. (2020-09-17)

Study shows SARS-CoV-2 jumped between people and mink, providing strong evidence of zoonotic transmission
A study investigating SARS-CoV-2 infections across 16 mink farms in the Netherlands, being presented at the ESCMID Conference on Coronavirus Disease (ECCVID, held online from 23-25 September) shows that the virus likely jumped between people and mink and back, providing strong evidence that animal to human (zoonotic) transmission is possible. (2020-09-17)

Pandemic accelerated remote work, a trend likely to remain
The coronavirus pandemic has profoundly changed workplaces and the nature of work itself, according to a new article published by an international panel of management experts, including Michael Wilmot, assistant professor in the Sam M. Walton College of Business. (2020-09-02)

Researchers show mathematically how to best reopen your business after lockdown
Model shows that Covid-19 can stay under control inside your company only if social distancing, PPE, and other measures are implemented for employees not working from home. These measures will also protect your net profit. (2020-08-11)

SDSU professor finds after-hours cannabis use has no impact on workplace performance
Dr. Jeremy Bernerth, management professor at San Diego State University and H. Jack Walker, management professor at Auburn University set out to determine the effects of different types of cannabis use (before, during and after hours) on work performance, especially as it relates to core job requirements, helping colleagues or their organizations, and counterproductive behavior in the workplace. (2020-08-11)

Inexpensive, accessible device provides visual proof that masks block droplets
In a proof-of-concept study appearing online Aug. 7 in the journal Science Advances, Fischer, Westman and colleagues report that the simple, low-cost technique provided visual proof that face masks are effective in reducing droplet emissions during normal wear. (2020-08-07)

Sense of normalcy bounces back fast: New study
Forthcoming in the Journal of Applied Psychology, a study of subjects during the outset of the COVID-19 crisis shows that psychological recovery can take place even while a person is still in the throes of a stressful experience. That's significant; previous research has suggested that recovery processes start after stressors abate. (2020-07-29)

Narcissists don't learn from their mistakes because they don't think they make any
When most people find that their actions have resulted in an undesirable outcome, they tend to rethink their decisions and ask, ''What should I have done differently to avoid this outcome?'' When narcissists face the same situation, however, their refrain is, ''No one could have seen this coming!'' In refusing to acknowledge that they have made a mistake, narcissists fail to learn from those mistakes, a recent study from Oregon State University - Cascades found. (2020-07-22)

Cyber expert on 'insider threat' attacks
Dr Duncan Hodges, Senior Lecturer in Cyberspace Operations, Cranfield University, is actively researching insider threats such as the recent Twitter attack. He and researcher Katie Paxton-Fear are presenting this paper Understanding Insider Threat Attacks Using Natural Language Processing, at the HCI International Conference on Thursday 23 July 2020 1400 CEST.  (2020-07-20)

In the sharing economy, consumers see themselves as helpers
Whether you use a taxi or a rideshare app like Uber, you're still going to get a driver who will take you to your destination. But consumers view an employee of a taxi company differently from an independent driver picking up riders via an app, a new Ohio State University study suggests. (2020-07-15)

After universal masking, health care worker COVID-19 rates drop at Mass General Brigham
A new study led by investigators from Brigham and Women's Hospital and published in JAMA makes it clear: after universal masking was implemented at Mass General Brigham, the rate of COVID-19 infection among health care workers dropped significantly. (2020-07-15)

Dream on
Daydreaming can be a significant asset to employees in a workplace, depending upon certain attributes of the wanderer -- specifically, if they identify with their profession or organization. (2020-07-13)

Study: Interplay of impact, moral goals influences charitable giving to different causes
With the rise of globalization, geographic borders are becoming less relevant for making charitable donations, which means nonprofits and charities can make more effective pitches to donors by emphasizing higher-level concepts such as morality and idealistic values, said Carlos Torelli, a professor of business administration and the James F. Towey Faculty Fellow at Illinois. (2020-07-07)

Study: Troubling connection between workplace pregnancy discrimination and health of mothers, babies
Perceived pregnancy discrimination indirectly relates to increased levels of postpartum depressive symptoms for mothers and lower birth weights, lower gestational ages and increased numbers of doctor visits for babies, according to a management study led by Baylor University. (2020-07-07)

Pregnancy stereotypes can lead to workplace accidents
A study of pregnant women in physically demanding jobs found that their fears of confirming stereotypes about pregnant workers as incompetent, weak or less committed to their job could drive them to work extra hard, risking injury. (2020-06-29)

The price of taking a stance: How corporate sociopolitical activism impacts bottom line
More businesses are taking a stand on controversial sociopolitical issues, and new research out of the University of Arizona sheds light on how those stances can impact the bottom line. Nooshin Warren with the Eller College of Management says the effects depend on a company's stakeholders, including customers, employees and state regulators. (2020-06-29)

Control over work-life boundaries creates crucial buffer to manage after-hours work stress
Workers with greater boundary control over their work and personal lives were better at creating a stress buffer to prevent them from falling into a negative rumination trap, says a new study co-written by a trio of University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign experts who study occupational stress and employee well-being. (2020-06-25)

Why do so many of us feel guilty about taking a lunch break?
New research from health psychologists at Staffordshire University explores why some employees feel guilty about taking their legally entitled breaks. The paper's lead author Dr Mike Oliver explained: ''The legally required minimum time for a lunch break at work is 20 minutes, however there is a growing trend nationally for large numbers of people not to take breaks at work, with surveys reporting that between 66% and 82% of workers don't always take their breaks. (2020-06-17)

Prodigiosin-based solution has selective activity against cancer cells
Together with colleagues from the University of Palermo, KFU employees offer a nano preparation based on biocompatible halloysite nanotubes and bacterial pigment prodigiosin; the latter is known to selectively disrupt cancer cells without damaging the healthy ones. (2020-06-12)

Red tape may have a silver lining for micro businesses -- new study
Small business owners who complain about excessive regulation may be overlooking the business benefits it brings, according to a new study from the University of Bath. (2020-06-08)

Not children, but 'super-happy families' the aim of assisted reproduction
Researcher Judith Lind has studied how staff at fertility clinics view the assessments that childless couples and women undergo in order to access assisted reproduction. It emerges in the interviews that the assessment of the potential parents is based on the child's future welfare and on the responsible use of public resources. (2020-06-04)

Employers could face legal action over COVID-19 exposure, expert warns
Employers across the UK could face legal action from employees who return to work and contract the COVID-19 virus, a leading health and safety expert has warned. (2020-06-01)

Paid sick leave mandates hold promise in containing COVID-19
Paid sick leave (PSL) mandates like those found in the federal government's Families First Coronavirus Response Act may be helping to slow the spread of COVID-19, according to a new study by health economists at Georgia State and Tulane universities. (2020-05-29)

Environmental groups moving beyond conservation
Although non-governmental organizations (NGOs) have become powerful voices in world environmental politics, little is known of the global picture of this sector. A new study shows that environmental groups are increasingly focused on advocacy in climate change politics and environmental justice. How they do their work is largely determined by regional disparities in human and financial resources. (2020-05-28)

Study: Benefits of workplace wellness programs underwhelming
An interdisciplinary team of researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign studied the efficacy of workplace wellness programs and found only a modest impact on employee health, health beliefs and medical utilization. (2020-05-26)

Is your job killing you? Stress, lack of autonomy, ability can lead to depression, death
A new study from the Indiana University Kelley School of Business finds that our mental health and mortality have a strong correlation with the amount of autonomy we have at our job, our workload and job demands, and our cognitive ability to deal with those demands. (2020-05-19)

Older, larger companies benefit from not investing in worker safety, study finds
Companies best equipped to provide safe workplaces are the least likely to do so, because they benefit financially from forgoing the cost of enacting workplace safety practices, a recent study found. In some cases, companies with worker injury claims were more than 50% more likely to survive than their safer counterparts. (2020-05-13)

Burning out in silence
Russian companies still pursue authoritarian leadership styles, and employees often avoid articulating their concerns and complaints to management. Together with chronic stress and work-family imbalance, this can often result in emotional burnout. This is the conclusion of a study by researchers from North Dakota State University and HSE University. (2020-05-08)

How to win back customer defectors
The positive outcomes of customer reacquisition more than offset the costs. Successful reacquisition management, though, requires a failure-tolerant company culture and guidelines. (2020-05-07)

Could hotel service robots help the hospitality industry after COVID-19?
A new research study, investigating how service robots in hotels could help redefine leadership and boost the hospitality industry, has taken on new significance in the light of the seismic impact of the Covid-19 outbreak on tourism and business travel. The study by academics at The University of Surrey and MODUL University Vienna focuses on how HR experts perceive service robots and their impact on leadership and HR management in the hotel industry. (2020-05-06)

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