Current Enceladus News and Events

Current Enceladus News and Events, Enceladus News Articles.
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SwRI models point to a potentially diverse metabolic menu at Enceladus
Using data from NASA's Cassini spacecraft, scientists at Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) modeled chemical processes in the subsurface ocean of Saturn's moon Enceladus. The studies indicate the possibility that a varied metabolic menu could support a potentially diverse microbial community in the liquid water ocean beneath the moon's icy facade. (2020-12-16)

Milky Way family tree
Galaxies formed by the merging of smaller progenitor galaxies. An international team of astrophysicists led by a scientist from Heidelberg University has succeeded in reconstructing the merger history of our home galaxy, creating a complete family tree. To achieve this, the researchers analysed the properties of globular clusters orbiting the Milky Way with artificial intelligence. Their investigations revealed a previously unknown galaxy collision that must have permanently altered the appearance of the Milky Way. (2020-11-23)

The most sensitive instrument in the search for life in space comes from Bern
Researchers at the University of Bern have developed the highly sensitive ORIGIN instrument, which can provide proof of the smallest amounts of traces of life, for future space missions. Space agencies such as NASA have already expressed interest in testing ORIGIN for future missions. The instrument may be used on missions to the ice moons of Europa (Jupiter) and Enceladus (Saturn), for example. (2020-08-19)

Inside the ice giants of space
A new theoretical method paves the way to modelling the interior of the ice giants Uranus and Neptune, thanks to computer simulations on the water contained within them. The tool, developed by scientists from SISSA in Trieste and the University of California at Los Angeles, allows one to analyse thermal and electric processes occurring at physical conditions that are often impossible to reproduce experimentally, with a much easier and low-cost approach. (2020-08-10)

Hubble sees summertime on Saturn
Saturn is truly the lord of the rings in this latest snapshot from NASA's Hubble Space Telescope, taken on July 4, 2020, when the opulent giant world was 839 million miles from Earth. This new Saturn image was taken during summer in the planet's northern hemisphere. (2020-07-23)

Are planets with oceans common in the galaxy? It's likely, NASA scientists find
Several years ago, planetary scientist Lynnae Quick began to wonder whether any of the more than 4,000 known exoplanets, or planets beyond our solar system, might resemble some of the watery moons around Jupiter and Saturn. (2020-06-18)

What makes Saturn's atmosphere so hot
New analysis of data from NASA's Cassini spacecraft found that electric currents, triggered by interactions between solar winds and charged particles from Saturn's moons, spark the auroras and heat the planet's upper atmosphere. (2020-04-06)

New SwRI models reveal inner complexity of Saturn moon
A Southwest Research Institute team developed a new geochemical model that reveals that carbon dioxide (CO2) from within Enceladus, an ocean-harboring moon of Saturn, may be controlled by chemical reactions at its seafloor. Studying the plume of gases and frozen sea spray released through cracks in the moon's icy surface suggests an interior more complex than previously thought. (2020-01-22)

Dating a galaxy crash
A single star has provided information about the collision of the Milky Way with the dwarf galaxy Gaia-Enceladus. The event likely took place approximately 11.5 billion years ago (2020-01-15)

TESS dates an ancient collision with our galaxy
A single bright star in the constellation of Indus, visible from the southern hemisphere, has revealed new insights on an ancient collision that our galaxy the Milky Way underwent with another smaller galaxy called Gaia-Enceladus early in its history. (2020-01-13)

Collision helped make the Milky Way -- and now we know when
Researchers have pinpointed an early galactic merger that helped shape the Milky Way. The merger -- a collision, actually -- happened 11.5 billion years ago. That's when a small galaxy called Gaia-Enceladus slammed into what then existed of the Milky Way, Earth's home galaxy, which is about 13.5 billion years old. (2020-01-13)

Explaining the tiger stripes of enceladus
Slashed across the south pole of Saturn's moon Enceladus are four straight, parallel fissures or 'tiger stripes' from which water erupts. These fissures aren't quite like anything else in the Solar System. Researchers now think they have a model to explain them. (2019-12-09)

How Enceladus got its stripes
Saturn's icy moon Enceladus is of great interest to scientists due to its subsurface ocean, making it a prime target for those searching for life elsewhere. New research led by Carnegie's Doug Hemingway reveals the physics governing the fissures through which ocean water erupts from the moon's icy surface, giving its south pole an unusual ''tiger stripe'' appearance. (2019-12-09)

Why are there no animals with three legs?
If 'Why?' is the first question in science, 'Why not?' must be a close second. Sometimes it's worth thinking about why something does not exist. Such as a truly three-legged animal. Tracy Thomson, graduate student in the UC Davis Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, has been pondering the non-existence of tripeds. (2019-10-01)

Origin of massive methane reservoir identified
New research provides evidence of the formation and abundance of abiotic methane -- methane formed by chemical reactions that don't involve organic matter -- on Earth and shows how the gases could have a similar origin on other planets and moons, even those no longer home to liquid water. (2019-08-20)

The early days of the Milky Way revealed
A study led by researchers from the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias (IAC) puts a sequence to the events which gave rise to our Galaxy. (2019-07-22)

Saturn's moon Mimas, a snowplough in the planet's rings
The Solar System's second largest planet both in mass and size, Saturn is best known for its rings. These are divided by a wide band, the Cassini Division, whose formation was poorly understood until very recently. Now, researchers have shown that Mimas, one of Saturn's moons, acted as a kind of remote snowplough, pushing apart the ice particles that make up the rings. (2019-06-11)

Chemistry of stars sheds new light on the Gaia Sausage
Chemical traces in the atmospheres of stars are being used to uncover new information about a galaxy, known as the Gaia Sausage, which was involved in a major collision with the Milky Way billions of years ago. (2019-05-23)

Small, hardy planets most likely to survive death of their stars
Small, hardy planets packed with dense elements have the best chance of avoiding being crushed and swallowed up when their host star dies, new research from the University of Warwick has found. (2019-05-14)

NASA research reveals Saturn is losing its rings at 'worst-case-scenario' rate
New NASA research confirms that Saturn is losing its iconic rings at the maximum rate estimated from Voyager 1 and 2 observations made decades ago. The rings are being pulled into Saturn by gravity as a dusty rain of ice particles under the influence of Saturn's magnetic field. (2018-12-17)

Deep biosphere beneath the seafloor explored at American Geophysical Union fall meeting
The scientists are working to understand the nature of subseafloor microbial communities and whether these communities are unique. They're also researching where microbes in ocean crust come from and whether these microbes can provide clues about where to look for life on other planets. (2018-12-12)

Astronomers discover the giant that shaped the early days of our Milky Way
Some ten billion years ago, the Milky Way merged with a large galaxy. The stars from this partner, named Gaia-Enceladus, make up most of the Milky Way's halo and also shaped its thick disk, giving it its inflated form. A description of this mega-merger, discovered by an international team led by University of Groningen astronomer Amina Helmi, is now published in the scientific journal Nature. (2018-10-31)

Naturally occurring 'batteries' fueled organic carbon synthesis on Mars
Mars' organic carbon may have originated from a series of electrochemical reactions between briny liquids and volcanic minerals, according to analyses of three Martian meteorites. The discovery that natural systems can form a small corrosion-powered battery that drives electrochemical reactions between minerals and surrounding liquid has major implications for astrobiology. A similar process could occur anywhere that igneous rocks are surrounded by brines, including the subsurface oceans of Jupiter's moon Europa and Saturn's moon Enceladus. (2018-10-31)

A century-old model for life's origin gets significant substantiation
A century-old model for life's origin gets significant substantiation. (2018-07-25)

SwRI scientists find evidence of complex organic molecules from Enceladus
Using mass spectrometry data from NASA's Cassini spacecraft, scientists found that large, carbon-rich organic molecules are ejected from cracks in the icy surface of Saturn's moon Enceladus. Southwest Research Institute scientists think chemical reactions between the moon's rocky core and warm water from its subsurface ocean are linked to these complex molecules. (2018-06-27)

Study co-authored by UCLA scientists shows evidence of water vapor plumes on Jupiter moon
A combination of new modeling techniques and data from the Galileo spacecraft's flyby of Jupiter's icy moon Europa back in 1997 have revealed additional evidence of eruptions of water vapor, or plumes, venting from the moon. (2018-05-17)

New technique for finding life on Mars
Miniaturized scientific instruments and new microbiology techniques successfully identified and characterized microorganisms living in Arctic permafrost -- one of the closest analogs to Mars on Earth. By avoiding delays that come with having to return samples to a laboratory for analysis, the methodology could also be used on Earth to detect and identify pathogens during epidemics in remote areas. (2018-01-18)

Santa's workshop could be on snowy moon
Santa's winter workshop might be in space, as University of Warwick researchers are exploring whether snowy moons over a billion kilometres away from Earth are potentially habitable. According to Dr David Brown, and colleagues at Warwick's Centre for Exoplanets and Habitability, life could be supported on moons of ice and snow with vast oceans under their frozen surfaces, orbiting Jupiter and Saturn. (2017-12-19)

NASA investigates invisible magnetic bubbles in outer solar system
Forty years ago, the twin Voyagers spacecraft were launched to explore the frontiers of our solar system, and have since made countless discoveries, including finding magnetic bubbles around two of the outer planets. (2017-11-01)

Microscopic technique for detecting microbial life in enceladus water plumes
A new study has demonstrated the potential to use digital holographic microscopy (DHM) to detect microorganisms and evidence of life in water collected from the plume rising from the surface of Saturn's icy moon Enceladus. (2017-09-18)

NASA's Webb Telescope will study our solar system's 'ocean worlds'
NASA's James Webb Space Telescope will use its infrared capabilities to study the (2017-08-24)

Holographic imaging could be used to detect signs of life in space
Caltech engineer Jay Nadeau says a method called digital holographic microscopy could be used to detect living microbes in space. (2017-07-20)

This week from AGU: Greenland's summer ocean bloom likely fueled by iron
This week from AGU: Greenland's summer ocean bloom likely fueled by iron, new technique could help scientists track nitrous oxide sources, and more. (2017-07-12)

Surprise methanol detection points to an evolving story of Enceladus's plumes
A serendipitous detection of the organic molecule methanol around an intriguing moon of Saturn suggests that material spewed from Enceladus undertakes a complex chemical journey once vented into space. This is the first time that a molecule from Enceladus has been detected with a ground-based telescope. Dr. Emily Drabek-Maunder, of Cardiff University, will present the results on Tuesday, July 4, at the National Astronomy Meeting at the University of Hull. (2017-07-04)

Icy moons, galaxy clusters, and distant worlds selected targets for Webb Telescope
Mission officials for NASA's James Webb Space Telescope announced some of the science targets the telescope will observe following its launch and commissioning. These specific observations are part of a program of Guaranteed Time Observations (GTO), which provides dedicated time to the scientists that helped design and build the telescope's four instruments. (2017-06-15)

In a cosmic hit-and-run, icy Saturn moon may have flipped
Enceladus -- a large icy, oceanic moon of Saturn -- may have flipped, the possible victim of an out-of-this-world wallop. While combing through data collected by NASA's Cassini mission during flybys of Enceladus, astronomers from Cornell University, the University of Texas and NASA have found the first evidence that the moon's axis has reoriented, according to new research published in Icarus. (2017-05-31)

Joint UTSA-SwRI study shows how radioactive decay could support extraterrestrial life
In the icy bodies around our solar system, radiation emitted from rocky cores could break up water molecules and support hydrogen-eating microbes. To address this cosmic possibility, a University of Texas at San Antonio (UTSA) and Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) team modeled a natural water-cracking process called radiolysis. They then applied the model to several worlds with known or suspected interior oceans, including Saturn's moon Enceladus, Jupiter's moon Europa, Pluto and its moon Charon, as well as the dwarf planet Ceres. (2017-05-22)

Saturn spacecraft toting CU Boulder instrument starts swan song
Toting a $12 million instrument built by the University of Colorado Boulder, NASA's Cassini spacecraft made the first of 22 dives between the rings of Saturn and the gaseous planet today, the beginning of the end for one of NASA's most successful missions ever. (2017-04-26)

In experiments on Earth, testing possible building blocks of alien life
Extraterrestrial life, if it exists, could use different amino acid building blocks than living things here on Earth. To better understand what alien life might look like, researchers are studying which amino acids stand up to the types of extreme conditions found on other planets and moons. (2017-04-23)

SwRI scientists discover evidence for a habitable region within Saturn's moon Enceladus
Scientists from Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) have discovered hydrogen gas in the plume of material spraying from Saturn's moon Enceladus. Analysis of data from NASA's Cassini spacecraft indicates that the hydrogen is best explained by chemical reactions between the moon's rocky core and warm water from its subsurface ocean. The SwRI-led team's discovery suggests that Enceladus' ocean floor could include features analogous to hydrothermal vents on Earth, which are known to support life on the seafloor. (2017-04-13)

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