Current Energy Savings News and Events

Current Energy Savings News and Events, Energy Savings News Articles.
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Low-level jets create winds of change for turbines
Global wind power capacity has increased more than fivefold over the past decade, leading to larger turbines, but low-level jets are one cause for concern. The effects of these strong, energetic wind flows depend on how high the wind flows are in relation to the turbines. In the Journal of Renewable and Sustainable Energy, researchers considered three different scenarios in which the LLJs were above, below, and in the middle of the turbine rotors. (2021-02-23)

Salt reduction will prevent nearly 200,000 cases of heart disease and save £1.64bn
England's salt reduction programme will have led to nearly 200,000 fewer adults developing heart disease and £1.64 billion of healthcare cost savings by 2050, according to research by Queen Mary University of London. (2021-02-22)

Scientists link star-shredding event to origins of universe's highest-energy particles
A team of scientists has detected the presence of a high-energy neutrino in the wake of a star's destruction as it is consumed by a black hole. This discovery sheds new light on the origins of Ultrahigh Energy Cosmic Rays--the highest energy particles in the Universe. (2021-02-22)

CABBI researchers challenge the CRP status quo to mitigate fossil fuels
Amid population expansion and severe climate conditions threatening agricultural productivity, sustainable food production is a national priority. Simultaneously, advances in bioenergy agriculture are necessary to move our energy sector away from fossil fuels. A CABBI team led by Madhu Khanna and Ph.D. student Luoye Chen suggest allocating Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) land for energy biomass, eliminating the need for competition between food and energy crops and proving advantageous for landowners, the government, and the environment. (2021-02-22)

Graphene Oxide membranes could reduce paper industry energy costs
Paper industry wastewater recycling is among the most energy-intensive chemical processes in the world. Georgia Tech researchers have found a method to engineer membranes made from graphene oxide that allow water to get through it much faster than through conventional membranes and, in the process, can save the paper industry more than 30% in energy costs of water separation. (2021-02-22)

NREL heats up thermal energy storage with new solution meant to ease grid stress
Scientists from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) have developed a simple way to better evaluate the potential of novel materials to store or release heat on demand in your home, office, or other building in a way that more efficiently manages the building's energy use. (2021-02-16)

Research reveals why plant diversity is so important for bee diversity
A study in southern England reveals why bumble bees and honey bees thrive despite foraging on the same flowers. (2021-02-10)

Brazil: Air conditioning equipment days of use will double without climate action
Increasing demand for space cooling in Brazil will increase greenhouse gas emissions by 70-190% due to air conditioners, depending on how much we will mitigate climate change. A study carried out with the contribution of CMCC@Ca'Foscari explains the relationship between climate change, space cooling needs, and electricity demand in different regions of the country. (2021-02-10)

Shining a light on the true value of solar power
Utility companies have worried that solar panels drive up electric costs for the people who don't have panels. Michigan Tech renewable energy researchers show the opposite is actually true -- grid-tied solar photovoltaic (PV) owners are actually subsidizing their non-PV neighbors. (2021-02-09)

Low carbon transport at sea: Ferries voyage optimization in the Adriatic
What CO2 savings are potentially attainable through path optimization? How much can ferries' carbon intensity be decreased? What is the role of waves and currents? A new study led by the CMCC Foundation shows how the future least-CO2 ferry routes could look like. (2021-02-09)

Efficiency limits of next-generation hybrid photovoltaic-thermal solar technology
Spectral-splitting hybrid photovoltaic-thermal (SSPVT) technology has emerged as a promising route toward high-performance solar harvesting. In this research, scientists have developed a comprehensive framework for modelling SSPVT solar collectors. The framework can be used to determine the efficiency limits of such collectors and to indicate how these limits can be approached through the selection of optimal designs and materials. This work promotes and provides guidance to the design, development and deployment of next-generation solar systems. (2021-02-08)

Does Goal 7 Energy for All need a rethink?
Goal 7 of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) aims to ensure access to affordable, reliable, sustainable and modern energy for all by 2030. Yet according to new research by Copenhagen Business School the poor planning and execution of decarbonisation strategies in emerging markets challenges the aims of Goal 7. (2021-02-08)

Helping consumers save more by bursting their bubble of financial responsibility
When people perceive that their past financial behaviors have fallen short of their desired standard, they start to save more to restore perceptions of financial responsibility. (2021-02-04)

New global 'wind atlas' propels sustainable energy
Wind energy scientists at Cornell University have released a new global wind atlas - a digital compendium filled with documented extreme wind speeds for all parts of the world - to help engineers select the turbines in any given region and accelerate the development of sustainable energy. (2021-02-03)

NREL reports sustainability benchmarks for plastics recycling and redesign
Researchers developing renewable plastics and exploring new processes for plastics upcycling and recycling technologies will now be able to easily baseline their efforts to current manufacturing practices to understand if their efforts will save energy and reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Benchmark data calculated and compiled at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) provide a measurement -- at the supply chain level -- of how much energy is required and the amount of greenhouse gases emitted from the production of a variety of plastics in the United States. (2021-02-02)

Rumen additive and controlled energy benefit dairy cows during dry period
Getting nutrition right during a dairy cow's dry period can make a big difference to her health and the health of her calf. But it's also a key contributor to her milk yield after calving. New research from the University of Illinois shows diets containing consistent energy levels and the rumen-boosting supplement monensin may be ideal during the dry period. (2021-01-28)

Could "Power Walking" fuel the energy revolution? India is ready to step up
India has an energy problem. It currently relies heavily on coal and consumer demand is expected to double by 2040, making its green energy targets look out of reach. Part of the solution could come from harvesting energy from footsteps, say Hari Anand and Binod Kumar Singh from the University of Petroleum and Energy Studies in Dehradun, India. Their new study, published in the De Gruyter journal Energy Harvesting and Systems, shows that Indian attitudes towards power generated through piezoelectric tiles are overwhelmingly positive. (2021-01-19)

SolarEV City concept: Building the next urban power and mobility systems
Cities are responsible for 60-70% of energy-related CO2 emissions. As the world is increasingly urbanized, it is crucial to identify cost-effective pathways to decarbonize. Here, we propose a ''SolarEV City'' concept, in which integrated systems of cities' roof-top PVs with EVs as batteries can supply affordable and dispatchable CO2-free electricity for citie's dwerllers, which can reduce CO2 emission by 54-95% with 26-41% of potential cost savings by 2030. (2021-01-14)

Water and gender equality
New Stanford research finds installing piped water in rural Zambian homes frees up time in the daily lives of women and girls, while also promoting economic growth and food security - making an argument for piped water infrastructure investments across rural, low-income areas. (2021-01-14)

Saver or spender? People are not as financially responsible as they may think, study shows
According to new research from the University of Notre Dame, people think they are more financially responsible than they actually are. (2021-01-13)

A third of U.S. families face a different kind of poverty
Before the pandemic, one-third of U.S. households with children were already ''net worth poor,'' lacking enough financial resources to sustain their families for three months at a poverty level, finds new research from Duke University. In 2019, 57 percent of Black families and 50 percent of Latino families with children were poor in terms of net worth. By comparison, the rate for White families was 24 percent. (2021-01-06)

It's electrifying! This is how Earth could be entirely powered by sustainable energy
Can you imagine a world powered by 100% renewable electricity and fuels? It may seem fantasy, but a collaborative team of scientists has just shown this dream is theoretically possible - if we can garner global buy-in. The study explores what changes are needed in our energy mix and consumption patterns if we are to achieve 100% renewability in a way that supports everyone and the myriad of life on our planet. (2020-12-22)

Inverted fluorescence
Fluorescence usually entails the conversion of light at shorter wavelengths to light at longer wavelengths. Scientists have now discovered a chromophore system that goes the other way around. When excited by visible light, the fluorescent dyes emit light in the ultraviolet region. According to the study published in the journal Angewandte Chemie, such light upconversion systems could boost the light-dependent reactions for which efficiency is important, such as solar-powered water splitting. (2020-12-18)

NYS can achieve 2050 carbon goals: Here's how
By delving into scientific, technological, environmental and economic data, Cornell University engineering researchers examined whether New York could achieve a statewide carbon-free economy by 2050. Their finding: Yes, New York can reach this goal - and do it with five years to spare. (2020-12-18)

Nurse practitioners bring big savings to long-term care facilities in Quebec
Countries worldwide face challenges meeting the growing needs for long-term care services because of high costs. A study led by researchers from McGill University and Université du Québec en Outaouais shows that introducing nurse practitioners can significantly reduce costs and improve patient safety. (2020-12-17)

Engineers go microbial to store energy, sequester CO2
By borrowing nature's blueprints for photosynthesis, Cornell University bioengineers have found a way to efficiently absorb and store large-scale, low-cost renewable energy from the sun - while sequestering atmospheric carbon dioxide to use later as a biofuel. (2020-12-15)

Seabed sediment and asphalt areas are noteworthy sources of heat energy
According to a new study from the University of Vaasa, seabed sediment and asphalt areas are noteworthy sources of heat energy also in northern conditions. Sediment heat has been studied in Suvilahti, Vaasa, Finland and asphalt heat in the parking area of University of Vaasa for several years. (2020-12-14)

Benefits of renewable energy vary from place to place
A new study finds the environmental benefits of renewable power generation vary significantly, depending on the nature of the conventional power generation that the renewable energy is offsetting. The researchers hope the work will help target future renewable energy investments in places where they can do the most good. (2020-12-14)

Green energy transition: Early and steady wins the race
Researchers from Aarhus University and Karlsruhe Institute of Technology have modelled the decarbonisation of the sector-coupled European energy system using uninterrupted high-res hourly data for every European and Scandinavian country and network interconnectivity. The research has now been published in Nature Communications and the results are clear: To reach climate-neutrality by 2050 we need solar energy. And lots of it. (2020-12-04)

Optimising laser-driven electron acceleration
In a new paper published in the EPJ D, Etele Molnár, ELI-NP, Bucharest, and co-authors study and review the characteristics of electron acceleration in a vacuum caused by the highest-power laser pulses achievable today looking for the key to maximum net energy gain. (2020-12-04)

Detecting solar neutrinos with the Borexino experiment
A paper published in EPJ C by a team of authors including XueFeng Ding, Postdoc Associate of Physics at Princeton University, United States, documents the attempts of the Borexino experiment to measure low-energy neutrinos from the sun's carbon-nitrogen-oxygen (CNO) cycle for the first time. (2020-12-04)

UIC researchers identify new process to produce ammonia with a much smaller carbon footprint
Researchers describe a new process to produce ammonia with a potentially much lower carbon footprint. (2020-11-30)

Attosecond interferometry in time-energy domain
Analogous to the conventional spatial double-slit experiment, the time domain Young's experiment can be realized by using temporal slits for diffraction instead, and fringes in the energy domain are expected. As a time-energy domain interferometric device, the temporal Young's interferometer is anticipated to possess advantageous time resolving capability and holds the promise of tracking ultrafast processes. Scientists from China developed an all-optical attosecond few-slit interferometer and demonstrated its applications in time-energy domain high precision measurement (2020-11-24)

Using materials efficiently can substantially cut greenhouse gas emissions
Emissions from the production of materials like metals, minerals, woods and plastics more than doubled in 1995 - 2015, accounting for almost one-quarter of all greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions worldwide. Material efficiency needs to play a larger role in climate planning, a new report says. (2020-11-18)

Scientists develop a magnetic switch with lower energy consumption
Joint research conducted by the UAB has shown the ability to switch magnetizacion « on » and « off » using voltage in a new class of easy-to-fabricate materials containing nitrogen. These results, published in Nature Communications, may be used to reduce energy consumption in electronic technologies. (2020-11-18)

NREL advanced manufacturing research moves wind turbine blades toward recyclability
A new material for wind blades that can be recycled could transform the wind industry, rendering renewable energy more sustainable than ever before while lowering costs in the process. The use of a thermoplastic resin has been validated at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). Researchers demonstrated the feasibility of thermoplastic resin by manufacturing a 9-meter-long wind turbine blade using this novel resin, which was developed by a Pennsylvania company called Arkema Inc. (2020-11-17)

New simulation finds max cost for cost-effective health treatments
As health care costs balloon in the U.S., experts say it may be important to analyze whether those costs translate into better population health. A new study led by a Penn State researcher analyzed existing data to find a dividing line - or ''threshold - for what makes a treatment cost-effective or not. (2020-11-02)

Boosting the capacity of supercapacitors
Carefully designed covalent organic frameworks could make supercapacitor electrodes that have a greater ability to store electric charge. (2020-11-01)

Muscle pain and energy-rich blood: Cholesterol medicine affects the organs differently
Contrary to expectation, treatment with statins has a different effect on blood cells than on muscle cells, a new study from the University of Copenhagen reveals. Today, statins are mainly used in the treatment of elevated cholesterol, but the new results may help design drugs for a number of conditions. (2020-10-29)

Menstrual dysfunction is more common among young athletes than among non-athletes
Menstrual dysfunction is more prevalent in young Finnish athletes than it is among non-athletes of a similar age, but athletes experience less body weight dissatisfaction than non-athletes do. These findings are from a recent study at the Faculty of Sport and Health Sciences at the University of Jyväskylä, Finland. The study was conducted among members of sports clubs who exercised at least four times a week (athletes) and non-members (non-athletes). (2020-10-28)

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