Current Engineers News and Events

Current Engineers News and Events, Engineers News Articles.
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Controlling deflection in construction beams
In civil engineering, flexural beams are used to control the effect of vibrations that can cause cracks to appear in surfaces (concrete slabs) and beams. This is particularly important in buildings that require high tensile strength and where the use of machinery can cause a lot of vibrations that can disturb structural integrity. (2021-02-22)

UCF researchers use advanced light to reveal how different biofuels behave
Vehicles have evolved to become more efficient and sophisticated, but their fuel hasn't necessarily evolved along with them. The Department of Energy is determined to identify cleaner burning and renewable alternatives to gasoline, and through the work of two UCF researchers, the DOE is one step closer to that goal. (2021-01-12)

Surrey unveils breakthrough manufacturing process of ultra-thin sensor for smart contact lenses
Smart contact lenses could soon become mainstream thanks to a new manufacturing process that has allowed the University of Surrey to develop a multifunctional ultra-thin sensor layer. (2021-01-06)

3D-printed smart gel changes shape when exposed to light
Inspired by the color-changing skin of cuttlefish, octopuses and squids, Rutgers engineers have created a 3D-printed smart gel that changes shape when exposed to light, becomes ''artificial muscle'' and may lead to new military camouflage, soft robotics and flexible displays. The engineers also developed a 3D-printed stretchy material that can reveal colors when light changes, according to their study in the journal ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces. (2021-01-05)

New machine learning tool tracks urban traffic congestion
Using public data from the entire 1,500-square-mile Los Angeles metropolitan area, PNNL researchers reduced the time needed to create a traffic congestion model by an order of magnitude, from hours to minutes. (2020-12-02)

New fiber optic sensors transmit data up to 100 times faster
Fiber optic sensors - used in critical applications like detecting fires in tunnels, pinpointing leaks in pipelines and predicting landslides - are about to get even faster and more accurate. (2020-11-16)

Wolves alter wetland creation and recolonization by killing ecosystem engineers
Researchers observed and demonstrated that wolves affect wetland ecosystems by killing beavers leaving their colonies to create new ponds. (2020-11-13)

Next-generation computer chip with two heads
EPFL engineers have developed a computer chip that combines two functions - logic operations and data storage - into a single architecture, paving the way to more efficient devices. Their technology is particularly promising for applications relying on artificial intelligence. (2020-11-05)

Port engineers need guidance incorporating sea level rise into construction designs
A survey of maritime infrastructure engineers by University of Rhode Island researchers found that the rising sea level is often not factored into designs of ports, breakwaters, fishing piers and other coastal infrastructure. (2020-10-13)

Plant-based spray could be used in n95 masks and energy devices
Engineers have invented a way to spray extremely thin wires made of a plant-based material that could be used in N95 mask filters, devices that harvest energy for electricity, and potentially the creation of human organs. The method involves spraying methylcellulose, a renewable plastic material derived from plant cellulose, on 3D-printed and other objects ranging from electronics to plants, according to a Rutgers-led study in the journal Materials Horizons. (2020-10-07)

Engineers pre-train AI computers to make them even more powerful
Engineers at CSEM have developed a new machine-learning method that paves the way for artificial intelligence to be used in applications that until now have been deemed too sensitive. The method, which has been tested by running simulations on a climate-control system for a 100-room building, is poised to deliver energy savings of around 20%. (2020-09-22)

Contextual engineering adds deeper perspective to local projects
Contextual engineering is a novel approach combining technological expertise with deep understanding of cultural and societal conditions. Ann-Perry Witmer, University of Illinois, developed the concept based on her years of experience in water design engineering. She outlines the practice in a recent article, published in Journal AWWA (American Water Works Association), the leading journal for water engineers in the US. (2020-08-17)

How thoughts could one day control electronic prostheses, wirelessly
The current generation of neural implants record enormous amounts of neural activity, then transmit these brain signals through wires to a computer. But, so far, when researchers have tried to create wireless brain-computer interfaces to do this, it took so much power to transmit the data that the implants generated too much heat to be safe for the patient. A new study suggests how to solve his problem -- and thus cut the wires. (2020-08-04)

Engineers find thinner tissues in replacement heart valves create problematic flutter
Iowa State and University of Texas engineers have developed high-fidelity computational models of replacement heart valves to examine the performance of biological tissues built into the valves. They found that thinner tissues can flap and flutter, which can damage the valves and even the blood that flows by. (2020-07-29)

Looking at linkers helps to join the dots
Understanding the optimal process for fabricating coupled nanocrystal solids could help researchers to improve optoelectronics devices. (2020-07-09)

More ecosystem engineers create stability, preventing extinctions
Biological builders like beavers, elephants, and shipworms re-engineer their environments. How this affects their ecological network is the subject of new research, which finds that increasing the number of ''ecosystem engineers'' stabilizes the entire network against extinctions. (2020-07-03)

It's not about money -- why academic scientists engage in commercial activities
For scientists, engaging in commercial activities such as patenting and starting new ventures can be much more lucrative than relying on pure academic work. However, according to new research by ESMT Berlin, money is not the main reason why scientists choose to work on commercial activities. Motives such as social impact seem more important. (2020-06-18)

Pure red LEDs fulfill a primary goal
First high-intensity, low-voltage red LEDs made from nitride semiconductors. (2020-05-06)

Engineers demonstrate next-generation solar cells can take the heat, maintain efficiency
Iowa State engineers have developed a next-generation solar cell that takes advantage of the promising elctro-optical properties of perovskite materials. They've made the materials much more stable at high temperatures and demonstrated a consistent, clean way to fabricate them into solar cells. Those could be important steps toward commercial production of new, low-cost, efficient, lightweight and flexible solar cells. (2020-05-04)

A great new way to paint 3D-printed objects
Rutgers engineers have created a highly effective way to paint complex 3D-printed objects, such as lightweight frames for aircraft and biomedical stents, that could save manufacturers time and money and provide new opportunities to create ''smart skins'' for printed parts. The findings are published in the journal ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces. (2020-04-28)

Solving a 50-year-old puzzle in signal processing, part two:
Two Iowa State engineers, who announced the solution to a 50-year-old puzzle in signal processing last fall, have followed up with more research results. The engineers say their new algorithm is more useful and just as fast as the one previously used. (2020-03-25)

New device quickly detects harmful bacteria in blood
Engineers have created a tiny device that can rapidly detect harmful bacteria in blood, allowing health care professionals to pinpoint the cause of potentially deadly infections and fight them with drugs. The Rutgers coauthored study, led by researchers at Rochester Institute of Technology, is published in the journal ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces. (2020-03-23)

Scientists came up with nanoconcrete for casting under negative temperature conditions
Engineers from Far Eastern Federal University Military training center (FEFU, Vladivostok, Russia) together with colleagues from RUDN University have developed concrete mixture with nano additives for monolithic construction up to ten stories high. The concrete casting is possible within a very humid climate and negative temperature down to minus 5-degree centigrade. Given that, the constructed buildings will not require major renewal for 50 years. The related article is published in Construction and Building Materials. (2020-02-28)

Carrier-assisted differential detection
Hyperscale datacenters have sprung up across the globe rapidly. This generate tremendous demand for high-capacity cost-effective optical communication links that interconnect these datacenters. Engineers at The University of Melbourne invented an innovative signal reception scheme tailored for datacenter applications where the complex-valued double-sideband signals can be recovered via direct detection. The receiver architecture opens a new class of direct detection schemes that are suitable for photonic integration analogous to homodyne receivers in coherent detection. (2020-02-20)

In acoustic waves, engineers break reciprocity with 'spacetime-varying metamaterials'
Working in an emerging field known to as 'spacetime-varying metamaterials,' University at Buffalo engineers have demonstrated the ability to break reciprocity in acoustic waves. (2020-02-17)

Superior 'bio-ink' for 3D printing pioneered
Rutgers biomedical engineers have developed a 'bio-ink' for 3D printed materials that could serve as scaffolds for growing human tissues to repair or replace damaged ones in the body. The study was published in the journal Biointerphases. (2020-02-10)

Protein pores packed in polymers make super-efficient filtration membranes
A multidisciplinary team of engineers and scientists has developed a new class of filtration membranes for a variety of applications, from water purification to small-molecule separations to contaminant-removal processes, that are faster to produce and higher performing than current technology. This could reduce energy consumption, operational costs and production time in industrial separations. (2020-01-28)

Transformative 3D printing approach established from insight into developmental biology
Engineers need to get more creative in their approach to design and additive manufacturing (AM) systems, by taking inspiration from the way humans grow and develop, say researchers at the University of Birmingham. (2020-01-10)

New nano-barrier for composites could strengthen spacecraft payloads
The University of Surrey has developed a robust multi-layed nano-barrier for ultra-lightweight and stable carbon fibre reinforced polymers (CFRPs) that could be used to build high precision instrument structures for future space missions. (2019-12-23)

New system transmits high-speed unrepeated signal over 520 kilometers
Researchers from the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology have partnered up with engineers from Corning Inc., US, and T8, Russia, and developed a system for high-throughput data transfer over great distances without the need for signal repeating along the way. Systems of this kind could be used to provide internet connection and other communication services in remote communities. (2019-12-16)

A new way to control microbial metabolism
To help optimize microbes' ability to produce useful compounds but also maintain their own growth, MIT chemical engineers have devised a way to induce bacteria to switch between different metabolic pathways at different times. (2019-12-02)

Scratching the surface of perovskites
Professor Yabing Qi and his team in the Energy Materials and Surface Sciences Unit at OIST, in collaboration with researchers at the University of Pittsburgh, USA, have, for the first time, characterized the structural defects that prompt the movement of ions, destabilizing the perovskite materials. The researchers' findings, published in ACS Nano, may inform future engineering approaches to optimize perovskite solar cells. (2019-11-24)

Engineers help with water under the bridge and other tough environmental decisions
From energy to water to food, civil engineering projects greatly impact natural resources. One engineer hopes that other engineers can step up to the challenge to help make decisions clearer, if not easier. Using a sustainability-based optimization algorithm, a Michigan Tech team examines biofuels, sea level rise, and other challenges. (2019-11-12)

AI learns to design
Trained AI agents can adopt human design strategies to solve problems, according to findings published in the ASME Journal of Mechanical Design. (2019-11-06)

3D-printed plastics with high performance electrical circuits
Rutgers engineers have embedded high performance electrical circuits inside 3D-printed plastics, which could lead to smaller and versatile drones and better-performing small satellites, biomedical implants and smart structures. They used pulses of high-energy light to fuse tiny silver wires, resulting in circuits that conduct 10 times more electricity than the state of the art, according to a study in the journal Additive Manufacturing. (2019-11-05)

2D antimony holds promise for post-silicon electronics
Researchers in the Cockrell School of Engineering are searching for alternative materials to silicon with semiconducting properties that could form the basis for an alternative chip. Yuanyue Liu, an assistant professor of Mechanical Engineering at UT Austin believes 2D antimony could be that material. (2019-11-04)

Fluorescent probes offer fuller view of drug delivery in cells
Selecting the most effective molecules for drug delivery is often a trial-and-error process, but Cornell engineers are providing some precision thanks to a technique that reveals the performance of those molecules inside living cells. (2019-11-01)

Concrete with improved impact endurance for defense structures developed at FEFU
Engineers from the Military Studies Center at Far Eastern Federal University (MSC FEFU) developed a brand-new concrete with improved impact endurance and up to 40% made of waste: rice husk cinder, limestone crushing waste, and siliceous sand. The new concrete is 6-9 times more crackle resistant than the types produced under GOST standards. The related article was published in Inorganic Materials: Applied Research. (2019-10-30)

Examination of conscience on the role of engineering in sustainable development
In a study conducted by 3 engineers, Josep Maria Basart (UAB), Mireia Farrús (UPF) and Montse Serra (UOC) presented in an article published in September in the journal IEEE Technology and Society Magazine. (2019-10-29)

Climate change could hasten deterioration of US bridge infrastructure
Hussam Mahmoud is studying the toll climate change may take on aging US infrastructure, which includes over 600,000 bridges. Now, he is co-author of a new study linking the potential impacts of climate change with the structural integrity of thousands of bridges transecting America's highways and towns. Mahmoud's analysis demonstrates a need to rethink the nation's priority order of bridge repair, as climate change looms and infrastructure funding remains limited. (2019-10-23)

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