Current Eons News and Events

Current Eons News and Events, Eons News Articles.
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A new, clearer insight into Earth's hidden crystals
Geologists have developed a new theory about the state of Earth billions of years ago after examining the very old rocks formed in the Earth's mantle below the continents. (2021-02-17)

No new mountains formed during Earth's middle age, halting life's evolution for an eon
During the Proterozoic, Earth grew no taller - the tectonic processes that form mountains stalled, leaving continents devoid of high mountains for nearly 1 billion years, according to a new study. (2021-02-11)

Accounting for the gaps in ancient food webs
Studying ancient food webs can help scientists reconstruct communities of species, many long extinct, and even use those insights to figure out how modern-day communities might change in the future. There's just one problem: only some species left enough of a trace for scientists to find eons later, leaving large gaps in the fossil record -- and researchers' ability to piece together the food webs from the past. (2021-01-14)

Engineering speciation events in insects may be used to control harmful pests
This research provides the foundations for scientists to be able to prevent genetically modified organisms from reproducing with wild organisms. Additionally, the research will allow scientists to develop new tools to control populations of disease carrying insects and invasive species in a highly targeted fashion. (2020-09-08)

Engineers use heat-free technology to make metallic replicas of a rose's surface texture
Iowa State's Martin Thuo and his research group have developed technology to make metallic replicas of soft, natural surfaces such as rose petals. The team's metallic surfaces retained properties of the originals, including a rose petal's sticky, yet water-repelling textures. (2020-08-27)

Sustained planetwide storms may have filled lakes, rivers on ancient mars
A new study from The University of Texas at Austin is helping scientists piece together the ancient climate of Mars by revealing how much rainfall and snowmelt filled its lake beds and river valleys 3.5 billion to 4 billion years ago. (2020-08-19)

Invention: "Nanocage" tool untangles (molecular) spaghetti
A team of scientists at the University of Vermont have invented a new tool--they call it a ''nanocage''--that can catch and straighten out molecule-sized tangles of polymers --whether made of protein or plastic. This tool--that works a bit like pulling a wad of thread through a needle hole--opens a new way to create custom materials that have never been made before. (2020-07-10)

How does spatial multi-scaled chimera state produce the diversity of brain rhythms?
This work revealed that the real brain network has a new chimera state -- spatial multi-scaled chimera state, and its formation is closely related the local symmetry of connections. (2020-07-03)

Newly discovered protein gives signal for virus infection
Researchers at the University of Zurich have discovered a protein that enables adenoviruses to infect human cells. The Mib1 protein gives the virus the signal to uncoat the DNA and release it into the nucleus. Blocking this protein could therefore help people with weakened immune systems to fight dangerous viruses. (2019-12-17)

Rutgers researchers identify the origins of metabolism
A Rutgers-led study sheds light on one of the most enduring mysteries of science: How did metabolism -- the process by which life powers itself by converting energy from food into movement and growth -- begin? To answer that question, the researchers reverse-engineered a primordial protein and inserted it into a living bacterium, where it successfully powered the cell's metabolism, growth and reproduction. (2019-07-01)

Ant reactions to habitat disruptions inform a result of evolution, according to Conco
Concordia University biology professor Jean-Philippe Lessard reviews the ant traits system developed by Alan Andersen and calls for the creation of a global framework to help categorize the world's ant population. (2019-06-04)

New mineral classification system captures Earth's complex past
A system of categorization that reflects not just a mineral's chemistry and crystalline structure, but also the physical, chemical, or biological processes by which it formed, would be capable of recognizing that nanodiamonds from space are fundamentally different to diamonds formed in Earth's depths. (2019-06-03)

Chimps caught crabbing
Kyoto University researchers report on chimpanzees in Guinea fishing and consuming freshwater crabs, something previously undiscovered. The paper describes how this is a potential clue in explaining how our primarily fruit-eating ancestors began eating aquatic life, and supplementing their diet with nutrients critical for brain development. (2019-05-29)

Lines blurring between human herpes simplex viruses
The herpes simplex virus (HSV-1) that commonly infects the mouth, is continuing to mix with the genital herpes virus (HSV-2) to create new, different recombinant versions. Genital co-infection with both viruses could create opportunities for the viruses to recombine. This ability of the viruses to recombine poses problems for vaccine development, due to the risk of a live vaccine for genital herpes mixing with HSV-1 to form an infectious recombinant. (2019-04-30)

Evolution imposes 'speed limit' on recovery after mass extinctions
It takes at least 10 million years for life to fully recover after a mass extinction, a speed limit for the recovery of species diversity that is well known among scientists. Explanations for this apparent rule have usually invoked environmental factors, but research led by the University of Texas at Austin links the lag to something different: evolution. (2019-04-08)

Molecular machinery that makes potent antibiotic revealed after decades of research
Scientists at Rutgers and universities in Russia, Poland and England have solved a nearly 30-year mystery -- how the molecular machinery works in an enzyme that makes a potent antibiotic. The findings, which appear in the journal Molecular Cell, provide the tools to design new antibiotics, anticancer drugs and other therapeutics. (2019-01-17)

Narrowing the universe in the search for life
In the search for life on other planets, scientists traditionally have looked for a world with water. But an Ohio State geophysicist wonders if we should look to rocks instead. (2018-12-17)

Evolutionary origins of animal biodiversity
A new study by an international team of researchers, led by scientists from the University of Bristol, has revealed the origins and evolution of animal body plans. (2018-09-03)

Electrons take one step forward without two steps back
Researchers at the University of California, Riverside, have, for the first time, successfully used electric dipoles to completely suppress electron transfer in one direction while accelerating in the other. The discovery could aid development of improved solar cells and other energy-conversion devices and hasten the design of new and superb energy and electronic materials. (2018-06-08)

SwRI scientists introduce cosmochemical model for Pluto formation
Southwest Research Institute scientists integrated NASA's New Horizons discoveries with data from ESA's Rosetta mission to develop a new theory about how Pluto may have formed at the edge of our solar system. (2018-05-25)

Bringing water to the fountain of youth
A new study of the European common frog, Rana temporaria, published in the advanced online edition of the journal Molecular Biology and Evolution, offers some fresh clues that challenge the conventional scientific wisdom on sex-chromosome evolution. (2018-01-30)

Rutgers-led research could revolutionize nuclear waste reprocessing and save money
Seeking a better way to capture radioactive iodides in spent nuclear reactor fuel, Rutgers-New Brunswick scientists have developed an extremely efficient 'molecular trap' that can be recycled and reused (2017-11-01)

SwRI part of international team identifying primordial asteroids
Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) was part of an international team that recently discovered a relatively unpopulated region of the main asteroid belt, where the few asteroids present are likely pristine relics from early in solar system history. The team used a new search technique that also identified the oldest known asteroid family, which extends throughout the inner region of the main asteroid belt. (2017-08-03)

Glaciers may have helped warm Earth
Weathering of Earth by glaciers may have warmed the planet over eons by aiding the release of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere. A new study shows the cumulative effect may have created negative feedback that prevented runaway glaciation. (2017-07-31)

Freeze-frames of enzymes in action have implications for a new cancer treatment concept
Structural biologists at CSHL shed light on how a family of enzymes called TUTases regulate let-7, an essential regulator of development that is dyregulated in lung and kidney cancers, among others. The team used x-ray crystallography to capture the equivalent of freeze-frames of TUTases, at the resolution of individual atoms, interacting with other molecules to regulate the activity of let-7. this work will aid efforts to target TUTases as a way of increasing expression of let-7 in cancer cells. (2017-07-03)

Gene networks dictate plants' responses to cold, stress
Recent advances in technology have allowed scientists to probe the molecular nature of life, analyzing thousands of genes at a time and recognizing patterns of gene interaction. In a recent paper published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, complexity scientist Samuel Scarpino and co-authors explore gene co-expression networks that have evolved to help plants withstand drought and cold. (2017-06-28)

Aging gracefully in the rainforest
In an article that appears in the current issue of Evolutionary Anthropology, researchers synthesize over 15 years of theoretical and empirical findings from long-term study of the Tsimane forager-farmers. In they find productivity and social status peak long after physical strength. (2017-05-09)

Next Generation TimeTree: An expanded history of life on Earth at your fingertips
A golden age of a global family tree of life on Earth is upon us now with the widespread use of next-generation DNA sequencing generating millions of sequence data. A next generation TimeTree web can now help make it easier for people to make sense of much of that data. Imagine the history of life on Earth at your fingertips combined with the power to quickly cull five decades' worth of all the evolutionary sequencing data and embedded geological studies. (2017-04-06)

University of Toronto study uncovers gene that may strongly influence obesity
A University of Toronto study on fruit flies has uncovered a gene that could play a key role in obesity in humans. The paper published online this month in Genetics examines a 'foraging gene' humans share in common with the flies, which plays multiple roles and is found in similar places, such as the nervous system, in the muscle and in fat. Researchers say the study nails the gene for being very important for the traits of moving, feeding and fat storage. (2017-02-21)

A fertilizer dearth foiled animal evolution for eons?
Earth was inhospitable to complex life for billions of years, practically suffocating evolution in a nearly oxygen-free environment. Then came a shift in phosphorus concentrations to ocean shallows, and after that, the evolution of complex life exploded. (2016-12-21)

How turtles and crocodiles lost parietal eye and differing color vision adaptations
University of California zoologist Christopher Emerling has traced back 200 million years of eye evolution in turtles and crocodiles and contributed to a new understanding of color vision. It turns out that some turtles have reduced their color vision during their adaptation to fresh water and crocodiles have 'reinvented' vertebrate color vision for their nocturnal habits. (2016-12-08)

Cycad seed tissue loaded with carbohydrates
University of Guam scientists study sugar and starch relationship of cycad seeds. (2016-11-29)

Did comets kick-start life on Earth? (video)
The origins of life on Earth are still shrouded in mystery. One compelling possibility is that comets delivered the building blocks for life eons ago. This week, Speaking of Chemistry explains the chemistry behind how these icy, lumpy space rocks might have seeded life on Earth. Check out the video here: https://youtu.be/FnuldVd99x8. (2016-11-23)

Artistic space odyssey to broadcast people's messages to the stars
Messages from around the world are to be beamed into space at the speed of light as part of a cultural project to create a celestial time capsule. (2016-02-08)

Alternative stellar lifestyle: Common, curious, solved at last
Half of all stars are in binaries -- pairs of stars that orbit each other. Half of binary stars orbit so close that gravitational interaction significantly affects their evolution and demise. Today, scientists confirmed one of the possible explanations for a common group of exceptions: the blue stragglers. (2015-12-08)

Research prompts rethink of enzyme evolution
New research by scientists at New Zealand's University of Otago suggests a need for a fundamental rethink of the evolutionary path of enzymes, the proteins vital to all life on Earth. (2015-04-28)

New perspectives on how ecological communities are assembled
What do you get when you combine a professor who literally wrote the book on community ecology and another who has more than 40 years experience as a leader in the field of evolutionary biology? You get a new way to look at how organisms of all sorts interact and evolve to form ecological communities. (2015-04-21)

Amber fossil links earliest grasses, dinosaurs and fungus used to produce LSD
A perfectly preserved amber fossil from Myanmar has been found that provides evidence of the earliest grass specimen ever discovered -- about 100 million years old -- and even then it was topped by a fungus similar to ergot, a hallucinogen which for eons has been intertwined with animals and humans. Among other things, it gave us the psychedelic drug LSD. (2015-02-09)

From eons to seconds, proteins exploit the same forces
Energy landscapes for protein folding operate on evolutionary processes that take eons as well as folding that takes microseconds, according to new research at Rice University. (2014-08-13)

All-you-can-eat at the end of the universe
A new model shows how early black holes could have grown to billions of times the mass of our sun. (2014-08-11)

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