Current Epidemics News and Events

Current Epidemics News and Events, Epidemics News Articles.
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Tool encoded in coronaviruses provides a potential target for COVID-19
Coronaviruses exploit our cells so they can make copies of themselves inside us. (2021-02-23)

Models to predict dengue, zika and yellow fever outbreaks are developed by researchers
Scientists will monitor areas in which these diseases are endemic, such as São Paulo, the Amazon, the Pantanal and Panama, to investigate the factors that trigger outbreaks (monkey being examined in Manaus área. (2021-02-23)

West Virginia's enduring, intertwined epidemics: Opioids and HIV
In a paper for The Lancet, West Virginia University Drs. Sally Hodder and Judith Feinberg state that the opioid and HIV epidemics are intertwined in West Virginia, and therefore should be treated together. (2021-02-22)

Richness of plant species reduces the number of viral infections in meadows
A new study indicates that agricultural activity confuses the mechanisms that regulate the occurrence of plant diseases in nature. A wider variety of virus species was found in meadows close to agricultural fields compared to those located in natural surroundings, with the richness of plant species having no effect on the number of virus species. However, maintaining biodiversity is worthwhile, as plant richness did reduce the number of viral infections in the meadows. (2021-02-08)

Unusual 2019-2020 flu season linked to more transmissible strain
The 2019-2020 flu season in the U.S. was unusual in a number of ways. Cases picked up in August rather than the more typical fall and early winter months, and it hit children particularly hard. (2021-02-04)

Age groups that sustain resurging COVID-19 epidemics in the United States
By late summer 2020, the resurgence of COVID-19 in the United States was largely driven by adults between the ages of 20 and 49, a new study finds. (2021-02-02)

Cancer-related suicide declined in the US during the past two decades
Despite increases in overall suicide rates in the United States during the past two decades, cancer-related suicides declined by 2.8% per year, according to a new study by the American Cancer Society. (2021-01-19)

Mapping the introduction of the COVID-19 epidemic in the United Kingdom using genomic analysis
The SARS-CoV-2 virus was introduced to the United Kingdom well over 1,000 times in early 2020, according to researchers who analyzed more than 50,000 viral sequences from the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic in the UK. (2021-01-08)

Asian tiger mosquito poses low risk for Zika virus outbreaks
The Asian tiger mosquito does not pose a major risk for Zika virus epidemics, according to a study published December 31 in the open-access journal PLOS Pathogens by Albin Fontaine of the Institut de Recherche Biomédicale des Armées, and colleagues. (2020-12-31)

Learning from three centuries of smallpox epidemics in London, UK
The current COVID-19 pandemic has caused a surge of interest in the study of infectious disease transmission, and how control measures could change the course of the pandemic. New research published on 21st December 2020, in the open access journal PLOS Biology, authored by Olga Krylova of the Canadian Institute for Health Information and David Earn of McMaster University, examines the history of recorded smallpox epidemics in London. (2020-12-21)

Researchers track and analyze smallpox epidemics over three centuries
Researchers from McMaster University have studied and analyzed thousands of weekly records documenting the deaths of smallpox victims in London, England over the span of nearly 300 years. The analysis provides new and rare insights into the ecology of infectious disease, establishing that the time between epidemics, the size of the outbreaks, and even the season when the epidemics occurred, changed over the centuries. (2020-12-21)

New approach can improve COVID-19 predictions worldwide
Methods currently used around the world for predicting the development of COVID-19 and other pandemics fail to report precisely on the best and worst case scenarios. Newly developed prediction method for epidemics, published in Nature Physics, solve this problem. (2020-12-15)

Russian mathematicians develop a new model for predicting epidemics based on precedents
Scientists from St Petersburg University have developed a new Case-Based Rate Reasoning (CBRR) model for predicting the dynamics of epidemics. Using this method, the researchers are preparing forecasts for the spread of COVID-19 in Russia. (2020-12-09)

Tension between awareness and fatigue shapes Covid-19 spread
In the midst of the coronavirus pandemic, two human factors are battling it out: awareness of the virus's severe consequences and fatigue from nine months of pandemic precautions. The results of that battle can be seen in the oddly shaped case, hospitalization, and fatality-count graphs, a new study suggests. (2020-12-08)

Study of virus attack rate in Manaus, Brazil, shows outcome of mostly unmitigated epidemic
Researchers studying data from blood donors in Manaus, Brazil, who experienced high mortality from SARS-CoV-2, estimate that more than 70% of the population was infected approximately seven months after the virus first arrived in the city. (2020-12-08)

Risk of vine-to-vine spread of Xylella fastidiosa is greatest in July and August
'Managing the spread of X. fastidiosa is challenging due to a lack of field data on seasonal changes in vector abundance, proportion of vector population carrying the pathogen, and probability of acquisition from infected plants,' explained Mark Sisterson, a vector entomologist with the Agricultural Research Service-USDA. (2020-12-07)

New understanding of mobility paves way for tomorrow's transport systems
Researchers at DTU and the University of Copenhagen have developed a ground-breaking model that provides a completely new understanding of our movement patterns. The model can come to play an important role when designing tomorrow's green modes of transport and has just been published in Nature. (2020-11-18)

X-ray imaging of a beetle's world in ancient earthenware
Using X-rays, Professor Hiroki Obata of Kumamoto University, Japan has imaged 28 impressions of maize weevils on pottery shards from the late Jomon period (around 3,600 years ago) excavated from the Yakushoden site in Miyazaki Prefecture. This is the first example of pottery with multiple weevil impressions discovered in Kyushu, and the density of impressions is the highest ever found in Japan. (2020-11-17)

A cost-effective program to fight COVID-19 in resource-challenged countries
A public health strategy that combines contact tracing and community-based screening with isolation and quarantine centers can substantially reduce infections, hospitalizations and deaths from COVID-19 while being cost-effective in low-and-middle-income countries like South Africa, a study by Massachusetts General Hospital has found. (2020-11-13)

The role of the Sun in the spread of viral respiratory diseases
Why do most viral epidemics spread cyclically in autumn and winter in the globe's temperate regions? According to an interdisciplinary team of researchers of the Italian National Institute for Astrophysics, the University of Milan, the Lombardy regional agency for the environment and the Don Gnocchi Foundation, the answer is intimately related to our Sun (2020-11-02)

To avoid impression that SARS-CoV-2 transmission is ever-changing, interpret new info using existing
The global spread of SARS-CoV-2 has taken a variety of forms, ranging from localized and quickly controlled outbreaks to large, ongoing epidemics with deadly consequences. (2020-10-22)

CRISPR-induced immune diversification in host-virus populations
Just like humans, microbes have equipped themselves with tools to recognize and defend themselves against viral invaders. In a continual evolutionary battle between virus and host, CRISPR-Cas act as a major driving force of strain diversity in host-virus systems. (2020-10-19)

Predicting influenza epidemics
Researchers at Linköping University, Sweden, have developed a unique method to predict influenza epidemics by combining several sources of data. The forecasts can be used, for example, when planning healthcare provision, such that resources can be redistributed in the best possible manner and give everyone the best possible care during an epidemic. (2020-10-15)

Cause of 1990s Argentina cholera epidemic uncovered
The evolution of epidemic and endemic strains of the cholera-causing bacterium Vibrio cholerae in Argentina has been mapped in detail. The researchers used whole genome sequencing to study the bacteria circulating during the 1991-1998 outbreak of cholera in the country. Published in Nature Communications, the data have influenced health policy in Argentina, where whole-genome sequencing is now used to distinguish between pandemic and non-pandemic lineages of V. cholerae bacteria. (2020-10-01)

COVID-19 and diabetes: what is the evidence?
In the COVID-19 special session taking place at the online Annual Meeting of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD), Prof. Juliana Chan, (The Chinese University of Hong Kong and Prince of Wales Hospital, Shatin, Hong Kong, China) will present a new review of the evidence on the devastating impact COVID-19 is having on people with diabetes. (2020-09-22)

Modeling future COVID-19 cases under a variety of immune responses, and with or without vaccines
Researchers who adapted standard epidemiological models to explore how the COVID-19 pandemic trajectory might unfold in the next five years report diverse scenarios ranging from recurring severe epidemics to elimination. (2020-09-21)

Pandemics and epidemics could exacerbate racism xenophobia
Human beings share these same biological impulses as other animals to separate into modular social groups. However, when pathogens are spreading, humans tend to also adopt behaviors that are ''hyper vigilant and particularly error prone,'' against those with different phenotypes. (2020-09-16)

COVID-19 may have been in LA as early as last December, UCLA-led study suggests
UCLA researchers and colleagues who analyzed electronic health records found that there was a 50% increase in patients with coughs and acute respiratory failure at UCLA Health hospitals and clinics beginning in late December 2019 and continuing into February, suggesting that COVID-19 may have been circulating in the area months before the first definitive cases in the U.S. were identified. (2020-09-10)

Warning: Epidemics are often followed by unrest
History teaches that social tension accumulated over an epidemic can lead to significant episodes of rebellion, according to a study. (2020-09-07)

Once infected, twice infected
A key to surviving in the wild is fighting off infection -- and not just once. For plants, as with humans, one infection may or may not leave a plant with lasting immunity. Biologists conducted a series of elegant experiments that capture how pathogen strains naturally accumulate on plants over a growing season. Their findings, reported in Nature Ecology & Evolution, reveal the importance of understanding interactions among pathogens when developing strategies for maintaining healthy crop populations. (2020-08-31)

Zika infection enhances Dengue disease risk
Prior Zika virus infection can enhance the risk of severe dengue disease, according to a new study, which uses a unique cohort from Nicaragua to confirm previous reports that have suggested the action of cross-reactive antibodies between the two closely related flaviviruses. (2020-08-27)

Lack of continuous infectious disease pandemic research endangers responses
The coronavirus was also studied considerably less than blood borne viruses like Hepatitis B or C and H.I.V. and its research community has less prolific researchers than the other investigated diseases. This translates into limited collaborations and a non-sustained investment in research on coronaviruses. Such a short-lived investment also reduces funding and may slow down important developments such as new drugs, vaccines or preventive strategies. (2020-08-17)

Mass General study shows physical distancing slowed growth of COVID-19 in US
New research shows government-ordered physical distancing mandates have slowed the spread of COVID-19, preventing approximately 600,000 cases within three weeks. (2020-08-11)

Researchers uncovered the Zika virus mutation responsible for quick spread, birth defects
A multidisciplinary team from The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston has uncovered a Zika virus mutation that may be responsible for the explosive viral transmission in 2015/2016 and for the cause of microcephaly (babies with small heads) born to infected pregnant women. The study is currently available in Proceedings of National Academy of Sciences. (2020-08-03)

Antibiotics use early in life increases risk of inflammatory bowel disease later in life
Even short, single antibiotic courses given to young animals can predispose them to inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) when they are older, according to Rutgers researchers. The study, published in Genome Medicine, provides further evidence supporting the idea that the use of antibiotics in children under 1 year old disrupts the intestinal microbiota - the trillions of beneficial microorganisms that live in and on our bodies - that play a crucial role in the healthy maturation of the immune system and the prevention of diseases. (2020-07-28)

Livestock expansion is a factor in global pandemics
The growth of global livestock farming is a threat to our biodiversity and also increases the health risks to both humans and domesticated animals. The patterns that link them are at the heart of a study published in Biological Conservation by a scientist from the Institute of Evolution Sciences of Montpellier (ISEM - CNRS/Université de Montpellier/IRD/EPHE) and the French Agricultural Research Centre for International Development's (CIRAD) ASTRE laboratory. (2020-07-24)

New study explains 'miracle' of how the Warsaw Ghetto beat Typhus
Through state-of-the-art mathematical modelling and historical documents, a new study points to community health programs and social distancing practices as the most likely explanations for the epidemic's sudden and mysterious collapse, which was hailed by survivors at the time as a miracle. (2020-07-24)

"Winter is coming": The influence of seasonality on pathogen emergence
Seasonal fluctuations drive the dynamics of many infectious diseases. For instance, the flu spreads more readily in winter. Two scientists from the University of Nantes and the CNRS in Montpellier have developed a mathematical model to predict the risk of the emergence of an epidemic, depending on the time of the year at which the pathogen is introduced. (2020-07-21)

Combining handwashing, mask-wearing and social distancing best in preventing COVID-19
Both self-imposed prevention measures such as hand-washing, mask-wearing and social distancing, as well as government-imposed social distancing can help mitigate and delay a COVID-19 epidemic, according to a new study published this week in PLOS Medicine by Alexandra Teslya of University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands and colleagues. (2020-07-21)

Weather-based decisions may reduce fungicide sprays on table beets
Use of a weather-based decision support system to schedule fungicides for the control of CLS in table beet reduces unnecessary expense to the grower and unnecessary exposure of a fungal population to single-site modes of action posing a high risk of resistance development. For more information, read 'Optimizing Cercospora Leaf Spot Control in Table Beet Using Action Thresholds and Disease Forecasting' in Plant Disease. (2020-07-21)

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