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Current Epidemics News and Events, Epidemics News Articles.
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Coordinated exit strategies crucial to avoid virus second-wave in Europe
Research by the University of Southampton shows European countries need to work together when lifting lockdown measures, to prevent COVID-19 cases rising again on the continent. (2020-07-17)

Coordination helps avoid continental COVID-19 resurgence, European modeling study shows
Coordinated lockdown strategies among countries is key to preventing resurgent COVID-19 outbreaks in continental Europe, a new modeling study shows. (2020-07-17)

Global wildlife surveillance could provide early warning for next pandemic
In a perspective article published July 9 in Science, a team of wildlife biologists, infectious disease experts, and others propose a decentralized, global wildlife biosurveillance system to identify -- before the next pandemic emerges -- animal viruses that have the potential to cause human disease. (2020-07-09)

Montana State researcher publishes paper examining COVID-19 spread
The work examines trends in visits to outpatient clinics for influenza-like illnesses in March 2020 as compared to previous years. (2020-06-25)

Countries with early adoption of face masks showed modest COVID-19 infection rates
Regions with an early interest in face masks had milder COVID-19 epidemics, according to a new letter-to-the-editor published in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine. (2020-06-24)

Viruses can steal our genetic code to create new human-virus genes
Study unveils novel mechanism that allows viruses to produce unexpected proteins. (2020-06-18)

Modeling the trajectory of COVID-19 cases in settings with weaker health systems
A new modeling study evaluating unfolding COVID-19 epidemics among different income countries reports that, in lower income countries, even if risk is reduced because populations are younger, this benefit is largely negated by limited health system capacity and closer inter-generational contact. (2020-06-12)

Infected insects may warn of impending citrus disease a year in advance
Despite the first appearance of citrus greening disease in Florida in 2005, the bacterium wasn't found in Texas until 2011, when scientists detected it in the psyllids. The disease was not detected in citrus years until 2012, suggesting that psyllids may actually be used for early detection of the HLB pathogen in newly invaded areas. (2020-06-09)

RIT scientists develop method to help epidemiologists map spread of COVID-19
Rochester Institute of Technology scientists have developed a method they believe will help epidemiologists more efficiently predict the spread of the COVID-19 pandemic. Their new study, published in Physica D: Nonlinear Phenomena, outlines a solution to the SIR epidemic model, which is commonly used to predict how many people are susceptible to, infected by, and recovered from viral epidemics. (2020-05-29)

Modeling COVID-19 data must be done with extreme care
As the virus causing COVID-19 began its devastating spread, an international team of scientists was alarmed by the lack of uniform approaches by various countries' epidemiologists. Data modeling to predict the numbers of likely infections varied widely. In the journal Chaos, the group describes why modeling and extrapolating the evolution of COVID-19 outbreaks in near real time is an enormous scientific challenge that requires a deep understanding of the nonlinearities underlying the dynamics of epidemics. (2020-05-19)

Study: How to identify patients most at risk from COVID-19 through nanotechnology
What if doctors could not only diagnose a COVID-19 infection but identify which patients are at the greatest risk of death before any major complications arise? One Michigan State University scientist believes nanotechnology may be the answer. (2020-05-18)

SARS-CoV-2: A new song recalls an old melody
Important lessons learned from the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) outbreak of 2002-2003 could inform and guide vaccine design for COVID-19 according to University of Melbourne Professor Kanta Subbarao, Director of the WHO Centre for Reference and Research on Influenza at the Doherty Institute. (2020-05-13)

COVID-19, digital technologies, and the future of disease surveillance
Several data-driven epidemiological approaches that have been proposed or trialed for COVID-19 are justified if implemented through transparent processes that involve oversight, write Michelle M. Mello and C. Jason Wang in this Policy Forum. (2020-05-11)

Perspective: Rapid COVID-19 vaccine development
When seeking the fastest pathway to a vaccine to prevent coronavirus disease 19 (COVID-19), defining the stakes and potential hurdles is critical, says Barney Graham in this Perspective. (2020-05-08)

How do epidemics spread and persist before and after introduction of a vaccine?
Modeling of measles epidemics in England and Wales from 1944 to 1994 shows that, before vaccination, measles could persist in both large population centers and by spread among sets of smaller towns. (2020-04-27)

Africa in the path of COVID-19
In a New England Journal of Medicine paper, researchers urge a coordinated global effort in the face of the COVID-19 pandemic, with countries around the world [taking] concrete steps to assist Africa in staying ahead of the curve, even as they confront their own epidemics. (2020-04-17)

High blood glucose levels may explain why some flu patients experience severe symptoms
Influenza A (a highly contagious virus that causes annual flu epidemics worldwide) may trigger an inflammatory 'cytokine storm' -- an excessive immune response that can lead to hospitalization or even death -- by increasing glucose metabolism, according to a new study. (2020-04-15)

COVID-19 in humanitarian settings and lessons learned from past epidemics
A new paper, ;COVID-19 in Humanitarian Settings and Lessons Learned from Past Epidemics' published in Nature Medicine, invokes a global response to protect the most vulnerable during the COVID-19 pandemic. (2020-04-08)

Locally informed simulation model predicts hospital capacity needs during COVID-19
CHIME includes a user-friendly interface so that hospital leaders can, at any time, independently estimate the time until their hospitals' capacities would likely be exceeded. The model also predicts the intensity of the surge, including need for ward and ICU beds and ventilators, and the duration of time that each hospital would experience a demand in excess of capacity, enabling users to plan for upcoming equipment and clinical staffing demands. A brief research report is published in Annals of Internal Medicine. (2020-04-07)

Researchers hope to improve future epidemic predictions
As the world grapples with the COVID-19 pandemic, a new mathematical model could offer insights on how to improve future epidemic predictions based on how information mutates as it is transmitted from person to person and group to group. The Army Research Office funded this model, developed by researchers at Carnegie Mellon University and Princeton University. (2020-04-06)

Plant disease primarily spreads via roadsides
A precise statistical analysis reveals that on the Åland Islands a powdery mildew fungus that is a common parasite of the ribwort plantain primarily spreads via roadsides because traffic raises the spores found on roadsides efficiently into the air. (2020-04-01)

A possible treatment for COVID-19 and an approach for developing others
SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19 disease is more transmissible, but has a lower mortality rate than its sibling, SARS-CoV, according to a review article published this week in Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy, a journal of the American Society for Microbiology. (2020-03-26)

Is the coronavirus outbreak of unnatural origins?
Did coronavirus mutate from a virus already prevalent in humans or animals or did it originate in a laboratory? As scientists grapple with understanding the source of this rapidly spreading virus, the Grunow-Finke assessment tool (GFT) may assist them with determining whether the coronavirus outbreak is of natural or unnatural origins. (2020-03-26)

New mathematical model can more effectively track epidemics
As COVID-19 spreads worldwide, leaders are relying on mathematical models to make public health and economic decisions. A new model developed by Princeton and Carnegie Mellon researchers improves tracking of epidemics by accounting for mutations in diseases. Now, the researchers are working to apply their model to allow leaders to evaluate the effects of countermeasures to epidemics before they deploy them. (2020-03-25)

COVID-19 should be wake-up call for robotics research
Robots could perform some of the 'dull, dirty and dangerous' jobs associated with combating the COVID-19 pandemic, but that would require many new capabilities not currently being funded or developed, an editorial in the journal Science Robotics argues. (2020-03-25)

How and where to allocate stockpiled ventilators during a pandemic
Key factors must be taken into account in determining the need for and allocation of scarce ventilators during a severe pandemic, especially one causing respiratory illness. (2020-03-20)

Scientists create model to predict multipathogen epidemics
In one of the first studies of its kind, bioscientists from Rice University and the University of Michigan have shown how to use the interactions between pathogens in individual hosts to predict the severity of multipathogen epidemics. (2020-03-05)

To predict an epidemic, evolution can't be ignored
Whether it's coronavirus or misinformation, scientists can use mathematical models to predict how something will spread across populations. But what happens if a pathogen mutates, or information becomes modified, changing the speed at which it spreads? In a new study appearing in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, a team of Carnegie Mellon University researchers show for the first time how important these considerations are. (2020-03-02)

Coral reefs: Centuries of human impact
In her AAAS talk, ASU researcher Katie Cramer outlines the evidence of the long-ago human footprints that set the stage for the recent coral reef die-offs we are witnessing today. Her studies have examined the origins of Caribbean coral reef declines by tracking changes over the past 3,000 years in the composition of a variety of fossils found in reef sediment cores she collected from Panama, including coral skeletons, fish teeth, urchin spines, mollusk shells, and others. (2020-02-14)

APS tip sheet: Predicting epidemics' speed
New analysis predicts how quickly an epidemic could spread globally. (2020-02-10)

The Lancet: Modelling study estimates spread of 2019 novel coronavirus
New modelling research, published in The Lancet, estimates that up to 75,800 individuals in the Chinese city of Wuhan may have been infected with 2019 novel coronavirus (2019-nCoV) as of Jan. 25, 2020. (2020-01-31)

New research establishes how first exposure to flu virus sets on our immunity for life
The first type of influenza virus we are exposed to in early childhood dictates our ability to fight the flu for the rest of our lives, according to a new study from a team of infectious disease researchers at McMaster University and Université de Montréal. (2020-01-30)

Crop residues are a potential source of beneficial microorganisms and biocontrol agents
While studies of the microbiomes (which comprises all the microorganisms, mainly bacteria and fungi) of the phyllosphere and the rhizosphere of plants are important, scientists at INRA believe more attention should be given to the microbiomes of crop residues. (2020-01-16)

Children's Hospital Colorado uncovers largest US outbreak of neurologic disease to date
The Lancet Infectious Diseases recently published the results of an observational study conducted by researchers at Children's Hospital Colorado that led to a discovery of the largest outbreak of enterovirus A71 (EV-A71) in the United States. (2020-01-08)

Hundreds of novel viruses discovered in insects
New viruses which cause diseases often come from animals. Well-known examples of this are the Zika virus transmitted by mosquitoes, bird flu viruses, as well as the MERS virus which is associated with camels. In order to identify new viral diseases quickly and prevent possible epidemics, DZIF scientists at Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin are targeting their search at viruses in animals. In a current study, they have now discovered hundreds of novel viruses in insects. (2020-01-08)

Climate change could make RSV respiratory infection outbreaks less severe, more common
Princeton University-led researchers studied annual outbreaks of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) in one of the first examinations of how climate change could affect diseases transmitted directly from person to person. They found that while outbreaks of RSV could become generally less severe, infections may become more common, which could leave people more vulnerable to the virus over the long term, particularly children. (2019-12-16)

Regional trends in overdose deaths reveal multiple opioid epidemics, according to new study
A recently published study shows the United States in the grip of several simultaneously occurring opioid epidemics, rather than just a single crisis. The epidemics came to light after the researchers analyzed county-level data on drug overdose deaths. The study highlights the importance of different policy responses to the epidemics rather than a single set of policies. (2019-12-09)

Chronic disease prevention could ease opioid crisis
Preventing chronic disease could help curb the opioid epidemic, according to research from the University of Georgia. The study is the first to examine the relationship between hospitalizations due to opioid misuse and chronic disease. (2019-12-05)

In the war on emerging crop diseases, scientists develop new 'War Room' simulations
This research evaluated the important sellers and villages in the Gulu region of Uganda, analyzing their potential role for spreading disease and distributing improved varieties of seed. The researchers used this data for 'War Room' style simulation analyses that highlighted the potential paths that a pathogen could take in advance of its spread. (2019-11-21)

An additional component can triple vaccine efficiency, and scientists explained how
A team of Russian scientists carried out a study on the cell immunity level and found out how an adjuvant called azoximer bromide increases the immunogenicity of the anti-flu vaccine. The results of the study were presented at the Russian-Chinese Symposium on Infectious Diseases in Saint-Petersburg (5-7 November, 2019). (2019-11-12)

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