Current Erosion News and Events

Current Erosion News and Events, Erosion News Articles.
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Measuring the belowground world
Life above ground depends on the soil and its countless inhabitants. Yet, global strategies to protect biodiversity have so far paid little attention to this habitat. Researchers led by the German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research (iDiv), Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU), Leipzig University (UL) and Colorado State University call for greater consideration of soils in international biodiversity strategies, far beyond agriculture. The researchers explain their plan for systematic recording to enable comprehensive policy advisory. (2021-01-14)

Expert prognosis for the planet - we're on track for a ghastly future
An international group of 17 leading scientists have produced a comprehensive yet concise assessment of the state of civilization, warning that the outlook is more dire and dangerous than is generally understood. (2021-01-13)

Study find physical weathering of rock breakdown more important than previously recognized
Anisovolumetric weathering is much more common than previously thought, and variations in this process can be explained by climate and erosion. (2021-01-13)

Soil degradation costs U.S. corn farmers a half-billion dollars every year
One-third of the fertilizer applied to grow corn in the U.S. each year simply compensates for the ongoing loss of soil fertility, leading to more than a half-billion dollars in extra costs to U.S. farmers every year, finds new research from the University of Colorado Boulder. (2021-01-12)

No-till practices in vulnerable areas significantly reduce soil erosion
Soil erosion is a major challenge in agricultural production. It affects soil quality and carries nutrient sediments that pollute waterways. While soil erosion is a naturally occurring process, agricultural activities such as conventional tilling exacerbate it. Farmers implementing no-till practices can significantly reduce soil erosion rates, a new University of Illinois study shows. (2021-01-12)

Surveys identify relationship between waves, coastal cliff erosion
Researchers have always known that waves were an important part of the cliff erosion process, but they haven't been able to separate the influence of waves and rain before. After decades of debate over the differing roles that both play, new findings provide an opportunity to improve forecasts. (2020-12-28)

Artificial intelligence helps scientists develop new general models in ecology
The automation of scientific discoveries is here to stay. Among others, a machine-human cooperation found a hitherto unknown general model explaining the relation between the area and age of an island and the number of species it hosts. (2020-12-11)

Getting to the bottom of Arctic landslides
Erosion of the frozen soil of Arctic regions, known as permafrost, is creating large areas of subsidence, which has catastrophic impact in these regions sensitive to climate change. As the mechanisms behind these geological events are poorly understood, researchers from the Géosciences Paris Sud laboratory (CNRS / Université Paris-Saclay), in cooperation with the Melnikov Permafrost Institute in Yakutsk, Russia, conducted a cold room simulation of landslides, or slumps, caused by accelerated breakdown of the permafrost. (2020-12-08)

Java's protective mangroves smothered by plastic waste
The mangrove forests on Java's north coast are slowly suffocating in plastic waste. The plastic problem in northeast Asia is huge and a growing threat to the region's mangroves; a natural alley against coastal erosion. Based on fieldwork published in Science of the Total Environment, NIOZ researcher Celine van Bijsterveldt shows that restoration of this green protection belt is impossible without better waste management (2020-12-07)

Coasts drown as coral reefs collapse under warming and acidification
The coastal protection coral reefs currently provide will start eroding by the end of the century, as the world continues to warm and the oceans acidify. The rate of erosion of calcium carbonate on coral reefs will overtake the rate of accretion on the majority of present-day reefs by the end of the century. (2020-12-03)

European colonization accelerated erosion tenfold
Rates of soil erosion and alluvium accumulation in North America accelerated 10-fold after Europeans colonized the continent, according to new research carried out by scientists from China, Belgium and USA. (2020-12-01)

Tracking down the causes of heart attack
Heart attacks strike suddenly and have a range of different triggers. Researchers from Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin and the German Centre for Cardiovascular Research (DZHK) were able to uncover a further underlying cause. Studying arterial deposits (plaque) in patients with acute coronary syndrome, the researchers found that, in some patients, these were characterized by activated immune cells which, as a result of altered flow conditions within the vessel, had accumulated on the interior arterial wall, causing damage to the arterial lining. (2020-11-10)

RUDN University soil scientist: Deforestation affects the bacterial composition of the soil
A soil scientist from RUDN University studied the effect of forest conversion on the properties of the soil: its acidity, carbon and nitrogen resources, bacterial composition, and the activity of microorganisms. The study can help improve the methods of soil cultivation after deforestation, namely, select the best fertilizers, prevent erosion, slow down nutrient depletion, and balance the composition of the bacterial community. (2020-11-09)

NYUAD study finds stellar flares can lead to the diminishment of a planet's habitability
In a new study researchers, led by Research Scientist Dimitra Atri of the Center for Space Science at NYU Abu Dhabi (NYUAD), identified which stars were most likely to host habitable exoplanets based on the calculated erosion rates of the planetary atmospheres. (2020-11-08)

Landscape to atomic scales: Researchers apply new approach to pyrite oxidation
Pyrite, or fool's gold, is a common mineral that reacts quickly with oxygen when exposed to water or air, such as during mining operations, and can lead to acid mine drainage. Little is known, however, about the oxidation of pyrite in unmined rock deep underground. (2020-10-29)

Beaches can survive sea-level rises as long as they have space to move
An international team of coastal scientists has dismissed suggestions that half the world's beaches could become extinct over the course of the 21st century. (2020-10-27)

Coastal permafrost more susceptible to climate change than previously thought
Research led by Micaela Pedrazas, who earned her masters at The University of Texas at Austin Jackson School of Geosciences working with Professor Bayani Cardenas, has found permafrost to be mostly absent throughout the shallow seafloor along a coastal field site in northeastern Alaska. That means carbon can be released from coastline sources much more easily than previously thought. (2020-10-23)

Wildfires can cause dangerous debris flows
Wildfires don't stop being dangerous after the flames go out. Even one modest rainfall after a fire can cause a deadly landslide, according to new UC Riverside research. (2020-10-22)

How rain can move mountains
Scientists have long thought that rainfall has a dramatic effect on the evolution of mountainous landscapes, but the reasons for how and why have been elusive. This seemingly logical concept has never been quantitatively demonstrated until now, thanks to a new technique that captures precisely how even the mightiest of mountain ranges -- the Himalaya -- bends to the will of raindrops. (2020-10-19)

Ground-breaking discovery finally proves rain really can move mountains
A pioneering technique which captures precisely how mountains bend to the will of raindrops has helped solve a long-standing scientific enigma. (2020-10-16)

Arctic Ocean sediments reveal permafrost thawing during past climate warming
Sea floor sediments of the Arctic Ocean can reveal how permafrost responds to climate warming. Researchers from Stockholm University has found evidence of past permafrost thawing during climate warming events at the end of the last ice age. Their findings, published in Science Advances, caution about what could happen in the near future: Arctic warming by only a few degrees Celsius may trigger massive permafrost thawing, coastal erosion, and the release of greenhouse gases. (2020-10-16)

Australian valley a 'natural laboratory' to test carbon sequestration theory
An idea to enhance natural carbon capture from olivine weathering has never been tested at scale. University of Sydney geoscientists have proposed the Tweed Valley as a laboratory and gained some interesting initial results. (2020-10-12)

Atmospheric dust levels are rising in the Great Plains
A study finds that atmospheric dust levels are rising across the Great Plains at a rate of up to 5% per year. The trend of rising dust parallels expansion of cropland and even seasonal crop cycles. And if the Great Plains becomes drier, a possibility under climate change scenarios, then all the pieces are in place for a repeat of the Dust Bowl that devastated the Midwest in the 1930s. (2020-10-12)

Heading upriver
A river's only consistent attribute is change. As the Greek philosopher Heraclitus remarked, 'No man ever steps in the same river twice.' Although this dynamic nature is often out of sight and mind, forgetting about it has led to many a historical catastrophe. (2020-09-30)

Lessons from a cooling climate
Usually, talk of carbon sequestration focuses on plants: forests storing carbon in the trunks of massive trees, algae blooming and sinking to the seabed, or perhaps peatlands locking carbon away for tens of thousands of years. (2020-09-29)

40% of O'ahu, Hawai'i beaches could be lost by mid-century
The reactive and piecemeal approach historically used to manage beaches in Hawai'i has failed to protect them. If policies are not changed, as much as 40% of all beaches on O'ahu, Hawai'i could be lost before mid-century, according to a new study by researchers in the Coastal Geology Group at the University of Hawai'i at Mānoa. (2020-09-21)

Venus' ancient layered, folded rocks point to volcanic origin
An international team of researchers has found that some of the oldest terrain on Venus, known as tesserae, have layering that seems consistent with volcanic activity. The finding could provide insights into the enigmatic planet's geological history. (2020-09-17)

Siberia's permafrost erosion has been worsening for years
The Arctic is warming faster than any other region on the planet. As a result, permafrost that is thousands of years old is now being lost to erosion. As measurements gathered on the Lena River by AWI experts show, the scale of erosion is alarming. (2020-09-16)

Dust may have controlled ancient human civilization
When early humans began to travel out of Africa and spread into Eurasia over a hundred thousand years ago, a fertile region around the eastern Mediterranean Sea called the Levant served as a critical gateway between northern Africa and Eurasia. A new study, published in Geology, shows that the existence of that oasis depended almost entirely on something we almost never think about: dust. (2020-09-15)

Global study reveals time running out for many soils - but conservation measures can help
Researchers found more than 90 per cent of the conventionally farmed soils in their global study were thinning, and 16 per cent had lifespans of less than a century. These rapidly thinning soils were found all over the world, including countries such as Australia, China, the UK, and the USA. (2020-09-14)

Worldwide loss of phosphorus due to soil erosion quantified for the first time
Phosphorus is essential for agriculture, yet this important plant nutrient is increasingly being lost from soils around the world. The primary cause is soil erosion, reports an international research team led by the University of Basel. The study in the journal Nature Communications shows which continents and regions are most strongly affected. (2020-09-11)

In the absence of otters, climate warming leads to Aleutian Reef decline
Sea otters prey on urchins and keep their population in check. When otters disappear, urchin populations explode, leading to overgrazing on kelp and a decline in kelp forests. (2020-09-10)

Land development in New Jersey continues to slow
Land development in New Jersey has slowed dramatically since the 2008 Great Recession, but it's unclear how the COVID-19 pandemic and efforts to fight societal and housing inequality will affect future trends, according to a Rutgers co-authored report. (2020-09-09)

Climate change and land use are accelerating soil erosion by water
Soil loss due to water runoff could increase greatly around the world over the next 50 years due to climate change and intensive land cultivation. This was the conclusion of an international team of researchers led by the University of Basel, which published the results from its model calculation in the scientific journal PNAS. (2020-08-24)

NASA study maps the roots of global mangrove loss
Using high-resolution data from the joint NASA-U.S. Geological Survey Landsat program, researchers have created the first map of the causes of change in global mangrove habitats between 2000 and 2016 - a valuable tool to aid conservation efforts for these vital coastline defenders. (2020-08-18)

First food-grade intermediate wheatgrass released
University of Minnesota researchers report the release of the first commercially available intermediate wheatgrass cultivar. (2020-08-06)

Early Mars was covered in ice sheets, not flowing rivers
A large number of the valley networks scarring Mars's surface were carved by water melting beneath glacial ice, not by free-flowing rivers as previously thought, according to new UBC research published today in Nature Geoscience. The findings effectively throw cold water on the dominant 'warm and wet ancient Mars' hypothesis, which postulates that rivers, rainfall and oceans once existed on the red planet. (2020-08-03)

Tiny plants crucial for sustaining dwindling water supplies: Global analysis
Miniscule plants growing on desert soils can help drylands retain water and reduce erosion, UNSW researchers have found. (2020-07-31)

Model links patterns in sediment to rain, uplift and sea level change
In a recent study, researchers from The University of Texas at Austin show that a natural record - sediments packed together at basin margins - offers scientists a powerful tool for understanding the forces that shaped our planet over millions of years, with implications on present day understanding. (2020-07-27)

Massive seagrass die-off leads to widespread erosion in a California estuary
The large-scale loss of eelgrass in a major California estuary -- Morro Bay -- may be causing widespread erosion. Over the last century, Morro Bay has been building up sediment quickly. After the die-off, however, erosion took place in more than 90% of the places where eelgrass previously grew. (2020-07-27)

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