Current Erosion News and Events | Page 2

Current Erosion News and Events, Erosion News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Viewed
Page 2 of 21 | 811 Results
Atomic force microscopy reveals nanoscale dental erosion from beverages
KAIST researchers used atomic force microscopy to quantitatively evaluate how acidic and sugary drinks affect human tooth enamel at the nanoscale level. This novel approach is useful for measuring mechanical and morphological changes that occur over time during enamel erosion induced by beverages. (2020-07-22)

Asteroid shower on the Earth-Moon system 800 million years ago revealed by lunar craters
A research team led by Osaka University investigated the formation ages of lunar craters to demonstrate that asteroids of 100 km in diameter were disrupted 800 Ma and that at least (4-5)×1016 kg of meteoroids, approximately 30-60 times more than the Chicxulub impact, must have plunged into the Earth-Moon system. (2020-07-21)

Geoscientists glean data suggesting global climate changes increase river erosion rates
Using cosmogenic nuclide burial dating methods and optically stimulated luminescence dating, geoscientists establish ages for river deposits from the Yukon River basin that span key time periods of global climate change. (2020-07-20)

New map for radioactive soil contamination in Western Europe
An international consortium of scientists has refined the map of caesium and plutonium radionuclide concentrations in soils in Switzerland and several neighbouring countries. Using an archive of European soil samples, the team led by Katrin Meusburger from the University of Basel, now at the WSL research institute, was able to trace the sources of radioactive fallout between 1960 and 2009. This study was published in Scientific Reports. (2020-07-16)

Supercomputer reveals atmospheric impact of gigantic planetary collisions
The giant impacts that dominate late stages of planet formation have a wide range of consequences for young planets and their atmospheres, according to new research. (2020-07-14)

Study reveals many great lakes state parks impacted by record-high water levels
UToledo student Eric Kostecky zeroed in on how coastal flooding and erosion in 2019 damaged park facilities, boat launches and roads and interrupted visitor experiences. (2020-07-07)

Climate change may cause extreme waves in Arctic
Extreme ocean surface waves with a devastating impact on coastal communities and infrastructure in the Arctic may become larger due to climate change, according to a new study. (2020-07-07)

Typhoon changed earthquake patterns
Intensive erosion can temporarily change the earthquake activity (seismicity) of a region significantly. This has now been shown for Taiwan by researchers from the GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences in cooperation with international colleagues. They report on this in the journal ''Scientific Reports''. (2020-07-02)

Scientists modelled natural rock arcades
Researchers from Russia and the Czech Republic performed numerical modelling of natural rock arcades using a mathematical model that describes a succession of arches forming as a result of weathering and then turning into rock pillars without human involvement, despite their striking resemblance to architectural arcades. (2020-06-23)

Strangely ordinary strata
Researcher uncovers why most of the records left by ancient rivers preserve commonplace processes. (2020-06-16)

Which factors control the height of mountains?
Which forces and mechanisms determine the height of mountains? A group of researchers from Münster and Potsdam has now found a surprising answer: It is not erosion and weathering of rocks that determine the upper limit of mountain massifs, but rather an equilibrium of forces in the Earth's crust. This finding, published in Nature, is fundamentally new and important for the earth sciences. (2020-06-11)

An essential sustainable farming practice faces one big limitation: Land to produce seeds
The growth in cover cropping in the United States may soon hit a ceiling: planting millions of acres of cover crops requires huge extensions of land to produce cover crop seed. Between 3 and 6 percent of the 92 million acres of cropping land currently used for corn (maize) in the U.S. may be required to produce cover crop seed for that land area. (2020-06-11)

Utah's arches continue to whisper their secrets
Two new studies from University of Utah researchers show what can be learned from a short seismic checkup of natural rock arches and how erosion sculpts some arches -- like the iconic Delicate Arch -- into shapes that lend added strength. (2020-06-11)

23 years of water quality data from crop-livestock systems
Researchers summarize runoff water quantity and quality data from native tallgrass prairie and crop-livestock systems in Oklahoma between 1977 and 1999. (2020-06-09)

Airborne science discovers complex geomorphic controls on Bornean forests
Using tree chemistry maps created by ASU's Global Airborne Observatory, high-resolution topography data, and computer models, researchers at Stanford University and Arizona State University's Center for Global Discovery and Conservation Science uncovered new insights into the processes behind how life coevolved with our planet. (2020-05-26)

Erosion process studies in the Volga Region assist in land use planning
Dr. Gusarov (Paleoclimatology, Paleoecology and Paleomagnetism Lab) has been working on erosion processes for two decades as a part of various teams. In this research, he tackled the Middle Volga Region, the one where the city of Kazan - and Kazan Federal University - are situated. (2020-04-27)

How atrazine regulations have influenced the environment
Opposing chemical trends linked to atrazine regulations from 1990s. (2020-04-22)

Unsustainable soil erosion in parts of UK
New research demonstrates unsustainable levels of soil erosion in the UK. (2020-04-22)

Plant root hairs key to reducing soil erosion
The tiny hairs found on plant roots play a pivotal role in helping reduce soil erosion, a new study has found. The research, led by the University of Bristol and published in Communications Biology, provides compelling evidence that when root hairs interact with the surrounding soil they reduce soil erosion and increase soil cohesion by binding soil particles. (2020-04-03)

Coral reefs 'weathering' the pressure of globalization
More information about the effects human activities have on Southeast Asian coral reefs has been revealed, with researchers looking at how large-scale global pressures, combined with the El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) climate pattern, can detrimentally impact these delicate marine ecosystems. (2020-03-11)

Cover crops can benefit hot, dry soils
Soil gets more than just 'cover' from cover crops. (2020-03-04)

World's sandy beaches under threat from climate change
Half of the world's beaches could disappear by the end of the century due to coastal erosion, according to a new study led by the Joint Research Centre, the European Commission's science and knowledge service. (2020-03-03)

Losing coastal plant communities to climate change will weaken sea defences
New research led by the University of Plymouth suggests the impact of rising sea levels and the increased frequency and intensity of extreme storm events on coastal plants needs to be placed in greater focus. (2020-02-03)

Research supports new approach to mine reclamation
Geomorphic reclamation is a relatively novel approach intended to mimic the topography of nearby undisturbed lands, with a wide variety of terrain that is stable and less susceptible to erosion. (2020-01-21)

Scientists explain how leaf apex enhances water drainage
Chinese scientists from the Technical Institute of Physical Chemistry of the Chinese Academy of Sciences have recently shown how the tiny apex structure in plant leaves controls water drainage and confers an evolutionary advantage. (2020-01-15)

Sand mining is threatening lives along the Mekong River
It's a resource used in global construction and mined from rivers and coasts across the world. Now new research, undertaken as part of a project led by University of Southampton, has shown sand mining is causing river beds to lower, leading to riverbank instability and increasing the likelihood of dangerous river bank collapse, damaging infrastructure and housing and putting lives at risk. (2020-01-14)

Evolving landscape added fuel to Gobi Desert's high-speed winds
A new study finds that the dark, rocky landscape of the Hami basin in the Gobi Desert helped to make it one of the windiest places in China. (2020-01-08)

Brassica crops best for crop rotation and soil health in potato production systems
Crop rotation is vital to any crop production system. Rotating crops maintains crop productivity and soil health by replenishing organic matter, nutrients, soil structure, and other properties while also improving water management and reducing erosion. Rotating crops also reduces the buildup of soilborne pathogens and diseases. (2020-01-03)

Research shows increased sediment flux in the Yangtze river headwater
Sediment flux (SF) in the Tuotuo River on the central Tibetan Plateau (TP), considered the main headwater of the Yangtze River, has significantly increased over the past three decades, according to new research led by scientists from the Institute of Tibetan Plateau Research of the Chinese Academy of Sciences. (2019-12-19)

Deforestation, erosion exacerbate mercury spikes near Peruvian gold mining
Scientists from Duke University have developed a model that can predict the amount of mercury being released into a local ecosystem from deforestation. The research could point toward ways to mitigate the worst effects of mercury poisoning in regions already experiencing elevated mercury levels caused by small-scale gold mining practices, such as those in the Peruvian Amazon. (2019-12-12)

What's driving erosion worldwide?
ETH Zurich researchers are reexamining the causes of soil erosion around the world -- and have found that countries themselves have a surprisingly strong influence on their soil. This country effect was previously undetected. (2019-12-03)

Study on surface damage to vehicles traveling at hypersonic speeds
Vehicles moving at hypersonic speeds are bombarded with ice crystals and dust particles in the surrounding atmosphere, making the surface material vulnerable to damage such as erosion and sputtering with each tiny collision. Researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign studied this interaction one molecule at a time to understand the processes, then scaled up the data to make it compatible with simulations that require a larger scale. (2019-11-19)

Coastlines' contribution to climate change might have been underestimated
Permafrost coasts make up about one third of the Earth's total coastline. As a result of accelerated climate change, whole sections of coastline rapidly thaw, and erode into the Arctic Ocean. A new study published in the journal Geophysical Research Letters now shows that large amounts of carbon dioxide are potentially being produced along these eroding permafrost coastlines in the Arctic. (2019-11-08)

Human activities boosted global soil erosion already 4,000 years ago
Soil erosion reduces the productivity of ecosystems, it changes nutrient cycles and it thus directly impacts climate and society. An international team of researchers, including Professor Pierre Francus at the Institut National de la Recherche Scientifique (INRS), recorded temporal changes of soil erosion by analyzing sediment deposits in more than 600 lakes worldwide. They found that the accumulation of lake sediments increased significantly on a global scale around 4,000 years ago. (2019-10-29)

Composite metal foam outperforms aluminum for use in aircraft wings
The leading edges of aircraft wings have to meet a very demanding set of characteristics. New research shows that a combination of steel composite metal foam and epoxy resin has more desirable characteristics for use as a leading-edge material than the aluminum currently in widespread use. (2019-10-21)

Managing stormwater and stream restoration projects together
A unified approach may benefit water quality, environment more than piecemeal. (2019-10-02)

Why are mountains so high?
Stanford researchers have analyzed mountain ranges worldwide to show that a theory relating erosion and mountain height doesn't always add up. (2019-09-23)

Wildfire can pose risks to reservoirs
Over the past 30 years, wildfires have gotten bigger, stronger, and occurred more often. As climates continue to warm, this trend will likely continue, causing disruption to landscapes and water systems alike. (2019-09-21)

Soils could be affected by climate change, impacting water and food
Coasts, oceans, ecosystems, weather and human health all face impacts from climate change, and now valuable soils may also be affected. Climate change may reduce the ability of soils to absorb water in many parts of the world, according to a Rutgers-led study. And that could have serious implications for groundwater supplies, food production and security, stormwater runoff, biodiversity and ecosystems. (2019-09-11)

Microplastics stunt growth of worms -- study
New research shows that the presence of microplastics can stunt the growth of earthworms, and even cause them to lose weight -- potentially having a serious impact on the soil ecosystem. (2019-09-11)

Page 2 of 21 | 811 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.