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Current Esophageal Cancer News and Events, Esophageal Cancer News Articles.
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Tobacco use makes precancerous cells that fertilize cancer growth
Inhibiting EGFR along with PI3K may negate EGFR escape route that precancerous cells provide to cancer cells to avoid PI3K inhibitors. (2019-04-01)
Excess body weight before 50 is associated with higher risk of dying from pancreatic cancer
Excess weight before age 50 may be more strongly associated with pancreatic cancer mortality risk than excess weight at older ages, according to results of a study presented at the AACR Annual Meeting 2019, March 29-April 3. (2019-03-31)
Researchers target metastasis in fight against cancer
An experimental combination drug therapy attacking the DNA integrity of cancer cells is showing promise for a possible new cancer therapy in the future. (2019-03-28)
Cancer prevention drug also disables H. pylori bacterium
A medicine currently being tested as a chemoprevention agent for multiple types of cancer has more than one trick in its bag when it comes to preventing stomach cancer, Vanderbilt researchers have discovered. (2019-03-28)
Protein 'spat out' by cancer cells promotes tumor growth
Prostate cancer cells change the behavior of other cells around them, including normal cells, by 'spitting out' a protein from their nucleus, new research has found. (2019-03-26)
Drinking hot tea linked with elevated risk of esophageal cancer
Previous studies have revealed a link between hot tea drinking and risk of esophageal cancer, but until now, no study has examined this association using prospectively and objectively measured tea drinking temperature. (2019-03-20)
A peek into lymph nodes
The vast majority of cancer deaths occur due to the spread of cancer from one organ to another, which can happen either through the blood or the lymphatic system. (2019-03-14)
A new machine learning model can classify lung cancer slides at the pathologist level
Dartmouth researchers have developed a deep neural network to classify lung cancer subtypes on histopathology slides and found that it performed on par with three practicing pathologists. (2019-03-04)
Breast cancer cells rely on pyruvate to expand in new tissues
Most patients who die of breast cancer die of metastasis, the process by which cancer cells spread to other organs of the body. (2019-03-04)
New study links electronic cigarettes and wheezing in adults
People who vaped were nearly twice as likely to experience wheezing compared to people who didn't use tobacco products, according to a study published in Tobacco Control. (2019-02-28)
Research suggests that medications for kidney transplants increase risk of skin cancer
A study led by researchers at RCSI (Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland) has analysed the pattern of skin cancer rates in kidney transplant patients, which suggests the increased risk is related to the anti-rejection medications. (2019-02-27)
Newly identified drug targets could open door for esophageal cancer therapeutics
Blocking two molecular pathways that send signals inside cancer cells could stave off esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC), the most common esophageal malignancy in the United States, according to new research out of Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine. (2019-02-27)
Colon cancer growth reduced by exercise
Exercise may play a role in reducing the growth of colon cancer cells according to new research published in The Journal of Physiology. (2019-02-27)
For young adult cancer survivors, debt and work-related impairments
One of the largest-ever studies of work-related risks in young adult cancer survivors finds that of 872 survivors, 14.4 percent borrowed more than $10,000 and 1.5 percent said they or their family had filed for bankruptcy as a direct result of illness or treatment. (2019-02-25)
Study: ACA Medicaid expansion shows impact on colon cancer screenings, survival in Kentucky
A new University of Kentucky study published in the Journal of the American College of Surgeons shows a direct link between the adoption of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) Medicaid expansion and the impact of colon cancer on Kentuckians. (2019-02-22)
Consuming garlic and onions may lower colorectal cancer risk
Consumption of allium vegetables -- which include garlic, leeks, and onions -- was linked with a reduced risk of in colorectal cancer in a study of men and women in China. (2019-02-21)
Report says health systems are key to improving cancer outcomes in the United States
A new report says without a national investment and commitment to transforming health care delivery in the United States, many people will not benefit from the substantial progress made against cancer. (2019-02-20)
New AI able to identify and predict the development of cancer symptom clusters
Cancer patients who undergo chemotherapy could soon benefit from a new AI that is able to identify and predict the development of different combinations of symptoms -- helping to alleviate much of the distress caused by their occurrence and severity. (2019-02-20)
Smoking may limit body's ability to fight dangerous form of skin cancer
Melanoma patients with a history of smoking cigarettes are 40 percent less likely to survive their skin cancer than people who have never smoked, according to a new report funded by Cancer Research UK. (2019-02-17)
Results of early endoscopic exam critical for assessment of Barrett's patients
A new study indicates that both high-grade abnormal cellular changes (dysplasia) and esophageal adenocarcinoma (a form of cancer) have increased in the last 25 years among people with a digestive condition known as Barrett's esophagus. (2019-02-14)
E-cig users develop some of the same cancer-related molecular changes as cigarette smokers
A small USC study shows that e-cig users develop some of the same cancer-related molecular changes in oral tissue as cigarette smokers, adding to the growing concern that e-cigs aren't a harmless alternative to smoking. (2019-02-14)
Recurring infections could lead to delayed bladder or kidney cancer diagnosis
Women with bladder or kidney cancer may lose out on a prompt diagnosis if they are already being regularly treated for recurring urinary tract infections (UTIs), according to new research presented at Cancer Research UK's Early Diagnosis Conference in Birmingham today (Wednesday). (2019-02-13)
Gene involved in colorectal cancer also causes breast cancer
Rare mutations in the NTHL1 gene, previously associated with colorectal cancer, also cause breast cancer and other types of cancer. (2019-02-11)
UMN researchers 3D bio-print a model that could lead to improved anticancer drugs and treatments
University of Minnesota researchers have developed a way to study cancer cells which could lead to new and improved treatment. (2019-02-11)
Financial relationships and prescribing practices between physicians and drug companies
In a study published in The Oncologist, physicians treating certain cancers who consistently received payments from a cancer drug's manufacturer were more likely to prescribe that drug over alternative treatments. (2019-02-06)
Greater efforts needed to address cancer therapies' effects on bone health
A new British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology review examines the impact of cancer therapies on the skeleton and how to limit bone loss and fractures in cancer patients treated with these therapies. (2019-02-06)
Study examines race-based differences in social support needs among breast cancer patients
In a Psycho-Oncology study of 28 women who were being treated for breast cancer and were participating in focus groups, White participants noted that having other breast cancer survivors in their support network was essential for meeting their social support needs. (2019-02-06)
Mapping oesophageal cancer genes leads to new drug targets
Mutations that cause oesophageal adenocarcinoma (OAC) have been mapped in unprecedented detail -- unveiling that more than half could be targeted by drugs currently in trials for other cancer types. (2019-02-04)
New study shows cost effectiveness of early cancer surveillance
New research published today in the journal Pediatric Blood and Cancer shows how early cancer screening and surveillance in patients with Li-Fraumeni syndrome (LFS) results in additional years of life, and is cost effective for third-party payers. (2019-02-04)
Engineering a cancer-fighting virus
An engineered virus kills cancer cells more effectively than another virus currently used in treatments, according to Hokkaido University researchers. (2019-01-29)
Persistent sore throat could be larynx cancer warning
GPs should consider larynx cancer when patients report a persistent sore throat, particularly when combined with other seemingly low-level symptoms. (2019-01-28)
Test for esophageal cancer could save millions of lives
Cancer of the esophagus claims more than 400,000 lives around the world each year. (2019-01-22)
Rutgers scientist identifies gene responsible for spread of prostate cancer
A recent study has found that a specific gene in cancerous prostate tumors indicates when patients are at high-risk for the cancer to spread, suggesting that targeting this gene can help patients live longer. (2019-01-17)
Mapping residual esophageal tumors -- a glimpse into the future?
Esophageal cancer is the sixth most common cause of cancer-associated death and continues to have a very poor prognosis. (2019-01-10)
Global colorectal cancer mortality rates predicted to rise
In the first effort to predict the future burden of colorectal cancer mortality globally, researchers note that colon and rectal cancer mortality rates are projected to decrease in most countries apart from some Latin American and Caribbean countries, but increases are predicted for several countries from Europe, North America and Oceania. (2019-01-09)
Cigarette smoking may contribute to worse outcomes in bladder cancer patients
In a study of patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer who had undergone radical cystectomy, cigarette smoking was linked with poor response to cisplatin-based chemotherapy. (2019-01-09)
Computational advances in the label-free quantification of cancer proteomics data
In this paper, the recent advances and development in the computational perspective of LFQ in cancer proteomics were systematically reviewed and analyzed. (2018-12-27)
Past and present of imaging modalities used for prostate cancer diagnosis
This review illustrates a perspective on prostate cancer imaging summarizing current imaging approaches with a special focus on Prostate Specific Membrane Antigen (PSMA), Bombesin (BN) and Androgen Receptor (AR) targeted imaging using Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and Single Positron Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) based on 99mTc and other radiotracers. (2018-12-24)
Chemotherapeutic drugs and plasma proteins: Exploring new dimensions
This review provides a bird's eye view of interaction of a number of clinically important drugs currently in use that show covalent or non-covalent interaction with serum proteins. (2018-12-20)
Genome offers clues to esophageal cancer disparity
A change in the genome of Caucasians could explain much-higher rates of the most common type of esophageal cancer in this population, a new study finds. (2018-12-20)
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