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Current Estrogen News and Events, Estrogen News Articles.
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Hormone therapy associated with improved cognition
Estrogen has a significant role in overall brain health and cognitive function. That's why so many studies focused on the prevention of cognitive decline consider the effect of reduced estrogen levels during the menopause transition. A new study suggests a cognitive benefit from a longer reproductive window complemented with hormone therapy. Study results are published online today in Menopause, the journal of The North American Menopause Society (NAMS). (2019-10-16)

Placenta transit of an environmental estrogen
The human foetus is considered to be particularly sensitive to environmental contaminants. A team led by Benedikt Warth from the Faculty of Chemistry at the University of Vienna and Tina Bürki from the Swiss Materials Science and Technology Institute, Empa, has now been able to demonstrate for the first time how the widespread food estrogen zearalenone behaves in the womb. Using a new analytical method, it was shown that the xenoestrogen migrates through the placenta and is partially converted to other harmful substances. (2019-10-10)

Babies burdened by environmental estrogens in mothers' wombs
Early childhood life in the womb is particularly sensitive to the effects of environmental pollutants. A team from Empa and the University of Vienna has now for the first time been able to show how a pollutant from contaminated food - the environmental estrogen zearalenone - spreads in the womb and is metabolized into harmful metabolites. (2019-10-10)

Study provides insights on treatment and prognosis of male breast cancer
A recent analysis reveals that treatment of male breast cancer has evolved over the years. In addition, certain patient-, tumor-, and treatment-related factors are linked with better survival. (2019-10-07)

Laser therapy gains credibility as effective option for treating vaginal problems
Nearly 50% of menopausal women complain of vaginal dryness, itching, and burning, among other commonly reported menopause symptoms. Laser therapy is one of the newer techniques for addressing these problems. A new study suggests that it is as effective and safe as vaginal estrogen in improving sexual and urinary functionality. Results are published online today in Menopause, the journal of The North American Menopause Society (NAMS). (2019-10-02)

Hormone therapy linked to decrease level of diabetes biomarkers
The Women's Health Initiative (WHI) remains one of the most highly quoted when debating the benefits and risks of hormone therapy. Now a new study based on WHI data demonstrates that, among other benefits, hormone therapy decreases a number of metabolites that are directly linked with Type 2 diabetes. Study results will be presented during The North American Menopause Society (NAMS) Annual Meeting in Chicago, September 25 to 28, 2019. (2019-09-24)

Rethinking how cholesterol is integrated into cells
Cholesterol is best known in connection with cardiovascular disease, but cholesterol is also vital for many fundamental processes in the body. In an international collaboration, researchers from Aarhus University have now presented a completely new, ground-breaking model for the integration and incorporation of cholesterol into cells, with great impact on our understanding of this important process. (2019-09-20)

Why young females with obesity are at early risk for cardiovascular disease
In the face of obesity, the sex hormone progesterone that helps females get and stay pregnant appears to also put them at increased, early risk for cardiovascular disease, investigators report. (2019-09-11)

Breast cancer gene a potential target for childhood liver cancer treatment
Hepatoblastoma is a rare liver cancer that mainly affects infants and young children and is associated with mutations in the β-catenin gene. Researchers from Osaka University screened uncharacterized targets of Wnt/β-catenin signaling and confirmed that breast cancer gene GREB1 plays a major role in hepatoblastoma cell proliferation. By interfering with GREB1 protein production, tumor formation was inhibited in a mouse liver cancer model, suggesting this approach could be used to develop a targeted hepatoblastoma therapy. (2019-09-03)

Detailed map shows how viruses infect humans
Columbia University researchers have generated a comprehensive map of protein-protein interactions that reveal how viruses infect human cells. (2019-08-29)

The role of a single molecule in obesity
A single molecule, derived from cholesterol, lurks inside your bloodstream and will increase your body fat, even if you don't eat a diet filled with red meat and fried food. A University of Houston biologist reports that reducing the levels of the molecule could result in reduced capacity for making fat. (2019-08-28)

Waist size, not body mass index, may be more predictive of coronary artery disease
For years, women have been told that weight gain could lead to heart disease. A new study indicates that it is the location of the fat that matters most, with abdominal fat representing the greatest harm and not overall body mass index (BMI) when assessing risk for coronary artery disease (CAD). Results are published online today in Menopause, the journal of The North American Menopause Society (NAMS). (2019-08-28)

Lavender oil may contribute to abnormal breast growth in young girls
Abnormal breast growth in young girls is linked to lavender oil exposure, according to a recent study published in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. (2019-08-14)

Estrogen improves Parkinson's disease symptoms
Brain-selective estrogen treatment improves the symptoms of Parkinson's disease in male mice, according to new research published in JNeurosci. These findings may help explain the sex differences in Parkinson's disease and could lead to estrogen-based treatments. (2019-08-12)

UMN Medical School researchers explain muscle loss with menopause
New University of Minnesota Medical School research is the first to show that estrogen is essential to maintaining muscle stem cell health. (2019-07-18)

Women's stronger immune response to flu vaccination diminishes with age
Women tend to have a greater immune response to a flu vaccination compared to men, but their advantage largely disappears as they age and their estrogen levels decline, suggests a study from researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. (2019-07-16)

Cincinnati researchers say early puberty in girls may be 'big bang theory' for migraine
Adolescent girls who reach puberty at an earlier age may also have a greater chance of developing migraine headaches, according to new research from investigators at the University of Cincinnati (UC) College of Medicine. (2019-07-11)

Does marital status affect prognosis after breast cancer diagnosis?
In a Cancer Medicine study of 298,434 patients diagnosed with breast cancer between 2004 and 2012, married patients had a better prognosis than patients who were single, who in turn had a better prognosis than those who were divorced, separated, or widowed. (2019-07-03)

Researchers find potential way to prevent most common pregnancy-related conditions
A new finding from University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM) researchers, published in the June issue of the journal Endocrinology, could have important implications for developing novel treatments to prevent placental abnormalities. (2019-06-19)

Triple-negative breast cancer among black women in the US varies by birthplace
A new study finds substantial variation in the prevalence of triple-negative breast cancer among black women with breast cancer by birthplace in the United States. (2019-06-13)

Vitamin D and estradiol help guard against heart disease, stroke, and diabetes
Vitamin D and estrogen have already shown well-documented results in improving bone health in women. A new study from China suggests that this same combination could help prevent metabolic syndrome, a constellation of conditions that increases the risk of heart disease, stroke, and diabetes in postmenopausal women. Results are published online today in Menopause, the journal of The North American Menopause Society (NAMS). (2019-06-12)

Higher estrogen levels linked to more severe disease in scleroderma
Scleroderma is a connective tissue disease that hardens the skin and scars the organs. Older men with scleroderma had higher estrogen levels than healthy older men or postmenopausal women with scleroderma, report Medical University of South Carolina and University of Pittsburgh researchers in Arthritis Research & Therapy. Higher estradiol levels were associated with more severe disease and heart involvement in these men and, in those positive for the autoantibody Scl-70, a greater risk of death. (2019-06-05)

New TAILORx data guides adjuvant therapy in younger breast cancer patients
New data from TAILORx, the largest-ever breast cancer trial, guides adjuvant therapy in younger breast cancer patients with even greater precision than the original findings: no benefit from chemotherapy if age 50 or less with a score of 16-20 on the 21-gene Recurrence Score (RS) test and at low risk, clinically (determined by tumor size/histologic grade). Clinical risk and RS together may identify premenopausal women who stand to benefit from more effective anti-estrogen therapy. (2019-06-03)

Menopausal changes to female heart happen earlier than thought
A new University of Guelph study is the first to reveal hidden changes that are happening to the female heart during perimenopause -- the stage before menopause sets in. (2019-05-23)

Study: Drugs reprogram genes in breast tumors to prevent endocrine resistance
Treating breast tumors with two cancer drugs simultaneously may prevent endocrine resistance by attacking the disease along two separate gene pathways, scientists at the University of Illinois found in a new study. The two drugs used in the study, selinexor and 4-OHT, caused the cancer cells to die and tumors to regress for prolonged periods. (2019-04-23)

Diet high in leucine may fuel breast cancer's drug resistance
A team led by Senthil Muthuswamy, PhD, at the Cancer Center at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, has discovered an unexpected relationship between levels of the amino acid leucine (found in beef, chicken, pork and fish and other foods) and the development of tamoxifen resistance in ER+ breast cancer. These findings reveal a potential new strategy for overcoming resistance to endocrine drugs in ER+ breast cancer patients. (2019-04-17)

Gut microbiota and phytoestrogen-associated infertility in southern white rhinoceros
Researchers from the San Diego Zoo Global Institute for Conservation Research have found the gut microbiota of the captive southern white rhinoceros may partially explain its infertility. They compared the gut microbiome of two rhinoceros species to investigate whether the gut microbes metabolize dietary phytoestrogens, which appear to play a role in infertility. The researchers show that reproductive outcomes may be driven by the gut microbiota's transformation of dietary phytoestrogens. (2019-04-09)

Blocking opioid receptors could reduce hormone-therapy-fueled increases in sugar intake
Estradiol is a commonly prescribed estrogen therapy. Previous research has found that rats treated with the hormone experience an increase in sugar consumption. But according to new research, blocking the body's opioid receptors can reverse this effect. The findings will be presented today at the American Physiological Society's (APS) annual meeting at Experimental Biology 2019 in Orlando, Fla. (2019-04-07)

Estrogen byproducts linked to survival in breast cancer patients
In an abstract presented at the American Association for Cancer Research Annual Meeting, researchers report findings from a study in which they measured levels of estrogen byproducts in urine from a group of women with breast cancer. Relative levels of ''good'' versus ''bad'' estrogen byproducts were linked to survival. (2019-03-30)

How does estrogen protect bones? Unraveling a pathway to menopausal bone loss
Women who have reached menopause are at a greater risk of developing osteoporosis, which can lead to bone fractures and long-term impairment of mobility. Studies have suggested a link between reduced bone density and low estrogen levels due to menopause, but the basis for this link is unclear. Researchers at Tokyo Medical and Dental University found that the protein Sema3A plays a key role in maintaining healthy bones, suggesting a new therapeutic avenue to treat osteoporosis. (2019-03-22)

Jury still out on what confers survival advantage in female trauma patients
Female hormones, particularly estrogen, do not seem to explain why women tend to have higher survival rates than men following severe trauma, an 11-year study using data from 815,843 Swedish patients suggests. The findings are published in the open access Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine. (2019-03-14)

Study: Free fatty acids appear to rewire cells to promote obesity-related breast cancer
Free fatty acids in the blood are linked with higher rates of estrogen-receptor positive breast cancer in obese postmenopausal women, according to a new study led by food science and human nutrition professor Zeynep Madak-Erdogan at the University of Illinois. (2019-03-13)

VA study evaluates quality indicators for hormone therapy in menopausal women
Improvements are needed in VA's prescribing of hormone therapy for menopausal women veterans, concludes a study in the Journal for Healthcare Quality, the peer-reviewed journal of the National Association for Healthcare Quality. The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer. (2019-03-07)

Menopause symptoms nearly double the risk of chronic pain
In addition to the other health conditions affected by estrogen, it has also been shown to affect pain sensitivity. This finding was the basis of a study of more than 200,000 records from the Veterans Health Administration that demonstrated a link between menopause symptoms and chronic pain. Study results are published online today in Menopause, the journal of The North American Menopause Society (NAMS). (2019-03-06)

The sneaky way estrogen drives brain metastasis in non-estrogen-dependent breast cancers
University of Colorado Cancer Center study shows that while estrogen doesn't directly affect triple-negative breast cancer cells, it can affect surrounding brain cells in ways that promote cancer cell migration and invasiveness (2019-03-01)

Estrogen made by neurons important to making memories
Estrogen in the brain is important to keep neurons communicating and memories being made, scientists report. (2019-02-25)

The importance of sex-specific strategies for prevention, treatment of heart failure in women
There are many important differences between women and men with heart failure, highlighting the importance of sex-specific strategies for prevention and treatment, according to three papers publishing today in JACC: Heart Failure. This special focus issue will explore heart failure in women. (2019-02-25)

Researchers develop new compound that offers superior therapeutic approach to treat MS
Previous studies have shown that estrogens and estrogen-like compounds reduce multiple sclerosis-like inflammation and disability in mice. At first glance these treatments appear promising, but they carry a host of negative side effects, from feminizing male mice to increasing the risk of cancer, heart disease and stroke. An interdisciplinary team of scientists have piggy-backed on this approach with a new concept that side steps the negative side effects while alleviating symptoms. (2019-02-20)

Hormone therapy may increase cardiovascular risk during gender transition
People receiving hormone therapy during gender transition had an elevated risk for cardiovascular events, such as strokes, blood clots and heart attacks. Findings underscore the importance of counseling and close monitoring of transgender patients receiving hormone therapy. (2019-02-18)

Texas A&M-led study explores the role of estrogen in controlling Type 2 diabetes
The results of a recent Texas A&M University-led study provide insights into the mechanism by which estrogen can decrease insulin resistance and the production of glucose, reducing incidences of Type 2 diabetes mellitus. (2019-02-12)

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