Current Estuaries News and Events

Current Estuaries News and Events, Estuaries News Articles.
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Protective ship coatings as an underestimated source of microplastic pollution
Shipping traffic can be a major source of microplastics, especially out in the open ocean. In a new study, a team of environmental geochemists from the University of Oldenburg (Germany) for the first time provides an overview of microplastics mass distribution in the North Sea. The scientists found that most of the plastic particles in water samples taken in the south-eastern North Sea originate from binders used in marine paints. Their hypothesis is that ships leave a kind of 'skid mark' in the water. (2021-02-23)

Newly discovered fossil named after U of A paleontologist
A newly discovered trace fossil of an ancient burrow has been named after University of Alberta paleontologist Murray Gingras. The fossil, discovered by a former graduate student, has an important role to play in gauging how salty ancient bodies of water were, putting together a clearer picture of our planet's past. (2021-01-26)

Wetter weather affects composition, numbers of tiny estuarial phytoplankton
Extreme weather events, such as hurricanes and increased precipitation, affect both the amount and the composition of picophytoplankton in the Neuse River Estuary. The work is a first step in determining how a wetter climate may affect the estuarine ecosystem. (2021-01-25)

Workshop collaboration aims to move tidal marsh research forward
Tidal marshes play a significant role in coastal ecosystems. They are a nursery ground for juvenile fishes and a line of defense in coastal erosion. However, there is still a great deal not known about tidal marshes. In November 2019, 65 scientists, managers, and restoration practitioners converged at the Dauphin Island Sea Lab to see where tidal marsh research has been and where it needs to go. (2020-11-09)

World first study shows that some microorganisms can bend the rules of evolution
The dominant thinking in evolution focuses on inheritance between parent and offspring - or 'vertical gene transfer (VGT)'. But now scientists are paying more attention to 'horizontal gene transfer (HGT)': the transmission of DNA other than from parent to offspring, as this transfer can tell us about the evolution of a number of other organisms such as bacteria. It can also help us to better understand antibiotic resistance. (2020-10-13)

Scientists catalogue shark and ray distribution in Florida lagoon
A study is the first long-term, in-depth analysis of the elasmobranch community in Florida's Indian River Lagoon and develops capacity to understand how these species may respond to further environmental changes. From 2016 to 2018, researchers caught 630 individuals of 16 species, including two critically endangered smalltooth sawfish. Results showed that many elasmobranchs use the southern Indian River Lagoon throughout their life histories and the area may serve as an important nursery habitat for multiple species. (2020-08-25)

Analyzing the factors that enable fish to reproduce in the Gulf of Cadiz
The Guadalquivir estuary showed the highest density of early stages fish and also of macro-zooplankton (fish prey). A higher concentration of organic matter (preferential food of the macrozooplanton in the Guadalquivir), provided by a greater flow of fresh water and correlated with total suspended solids, inorganic matter and turbidity, were the most typical characteristics of the Guadalquivir. (2020-08-13)

Fish reef domes a boon for environment, recreational fishing
Manmade reefs can be used in conjunction with the restoration or protection of natural habitat to increase fish abundance in estuaries, UNSW researchers have found. (2020-07-16)

Microplastic pollution accumulates heavily in coastal areas such as fjords and estuaries
Microplastic pollution in marine environments is concentrated most highly in coastal habitats, especially fjords and estuaries, according to a new review article published in the journal Marine Pollution Bulletin. (2020-06-30)

Effects from low-level concentrations of harmful chemicals preserved in three generations of fish
Fish exposed to very low levels of chemicals commonly found in waterways can pass the impacts on to future generations that were never directly exposed to the chemicals, according to Oregon State University researchers. (2020-06-24)

Carpet shell clams reveal high levels of pollution in several coastal lagoons in Tunisia
The clams with the greatest levels of heavy metals come from lagoons in which the water temperature is higher, according to a University of Cordoba study (2020-06-16)

Less water could sustain more Californians if we make every drop count
California cities can no longer rely on their three traditional water-coping strategies: over-drafting groundwater, depleting streams and importing water from far away. A new analysis focuses on several strategies that, taken together, can help cities provide for their growing population with prudent public policies and investments. (2020-05-19)

Estuaries are warming at twice the rate of oceans and atmosphere
A 12-year study of 166 estuaries in south-east Australia shows that the waters of lakes, creeks, rivers and lagoons increased 2.16 degrees in temperature and increased acidity. Researchers say this could impact economic activity and biodiversity worldwide. (2020-04-14)

Sea otters, opossums and the surprising ways pathogens move from land to sea
A parasite known only to be hosted in North America by the Virginia opossum is infecting sea otters along the West Coast. A study from the University of California, Davis, elucidates the sometimes surprising and complex pathways infectious pathogens can move from land to sea to sea otter. (2020-03-19)

Ocean acidification impacts oysters' memory of environmental stress
Researchers from the University of Washington School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences have discovered that ocean acidification impacts the ability of some oysters to pass down 'memories' of environmental trauma to their offspring. (2020-03-12)

Fresh groundwater flow important for coastal ecosystems
Groundwater is the largest source of freshwater, one of the world's most precious natural resources and vital for crops and drinking water. Researchers led by Göttingen University developed the first global computer model of groundwater flow into the world's oceans. Their analysis shows 20% of the world's coastal ecosystems - such as estuaries, salt marshes and coral reefs - are at risk of pollutants transported by groundwater flow from the land to the sea. Research appeared in Nature Communications. (2020-03-09)

Rivers: how they contribute to better understand the Mediterranean Sea dynamics
A new study lead by the CMCC Foundation will provide key information to support and improve the operational ocean forecasts released by Copernicus, develop climate scenarios, and in the future support the design of nature-based solutions to improve environmental resilience and reduce hydro-meteorological risks in Europe. Insights and perspectives from a study on Ocean Modelling lead by the CMCC providing a more realistic representation of estuarine dynamics into ocean models. (2020-03-05)

Super-urinators among the mangroves: Excretory gifts from estuary's busiest fish promote ecosystem health
A new University of Michigan-led study of individually radio-tracked tropical fish in a Bahamian mangrove estuary highlights the importance of highly active individuals in maintaining ecosystem health. (2020-02-26)

Parasitic worms have armies, and produce more soldiers when needed
In a new study published Feb. 26, 2020 in Biology Letters, the research team demonstrated for the first time that the number of soldiers in a trematode colony depends on the local invasion threat, showing that such societies produce greater standing armies in areas of greater threat. This has big implications for understanding how animal societies determine their resource allocation. (2020-02-25)

Why do whales migrate? They return to the tropics to shed their skin, scientists say
Whales undertake some of the longest migrations on earth, often swimming many thousands of miles, over many months, to breed in the tropics. The question is why? In a research paper in Marine Mammal Science, scientists propose that whales that forage in polar waters migrate to low latitudes to maintain healthy skin. (2020-02-21)

Study reveals hidden risks of estuary development for young salmon
A Simon Fraser University-led research team has found significant evidence that human activity in estuaries is impacting juvenile Pacific and Atlantic salmon. The team's review of 167 peer-reviewed studies identified negative impacts from several stressors, including the effects of flood-protecting tidal gates, pollution and habitat modification. (2020-02-20)

Alaska's national forests contribute 48 million salmon a year to state's fishing industry
Alaska's Tongass and Chugach National Forests, which contain some of the world's largest remaining tracts of intact temperate rainforest, contribute an average of 48 million salmon a year to the state's commercial fishing industry, a new USDA Forest Service-led study has found. The average value of these ''forest fish'' when they are brought back to the dock is estimated at $88 million per year. (2020-02-06)

The effects of microplastics on organisms in coastal areas
Microplastics (plastic particles under 5 mm) are an abundant type of debris found in salt and freshwater environments. In a Limnology & Oceanography Letters study, researchers demonstrated the transfer of microplastics through the food chain between microscopic prey and larval fish that live in coastal ecosystems. (2020-01-08)

Key to helping southern sea otter is in repopulating estuaries such as San Francisco Bay
California could triple the population of endangered southern sea otters by repopulating San Francisco Bay. (2019-12-10)

Fish in California estuaries are evolving as climate change alters their habitat
The threespine stickleback, a small fish found throughout the coastal areas of the Northern Hemisphere, is famously variable in appearance from one location to another, making it an ideal subject for studying how species adapt to different environments. A new study shows that stickleback populations in estuaries along the coast of California have evolved over the past 40 years as climate change has altered their coastal habitats. (2019-11-21)

Scientists study impact of sediments and nutrients from Conowingo Dam on Chesapeake Bay
A new study examines the influences of a river dam on the fate of sediments and nutrients on an estuary, using the Conowingo Dam and the Chesapeake Bay as a case study. (2019-11-11)

Pesticide management is failing Australian and Great Barrier Reef waterways
Scientists say a failure of Australian management means excessive amounts of harmful chemicals -- many now banned in countries such as the EU, USA and Canada -- are damaging the country's waterways and the Great Barrier Reef. (2019-11-07)

New study uncovers 'magnetic' memory of European glass eels
A new study led by researchers at the University of Miami (UM) Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science and at the Institute of Marine Research in Norway found that European glass eels use their magnetic sense to 'imprint' a memory of the direction of water currents in the estuary where they become juveniles. (2019-10-17)

The cholera bacterium can steal up to 150 genes in one go
EPFL scientists have discovered that predatory bacteria like the cholera pathogen can steal up to 150 genes in one go from their neighbors. The study sheds light on one of the most fundamental mechanisms of horizontal gene transfer. (2019-10-07)

New Mersey designs show tidal barriers bring more benefits than producing clean energy
When designed holistically, tidal barrage schemes can provide additional transport links for commuters, become tourism destinations, mitigate wildlife habitat loss, as well as provide opportunities to boost people's health and wellbeing with additional options for cycling and walking, say researchers from Lancaster University and the University of Liverpool. (2019-09-24)

Study confirms Monterey Bay Aquarium surrogate-reared sea otters helped restore threatened population
The population of threatened southern sea otters in Elkhorn Slough, an estuary in Central California, has made a significant comeback as a result of Monterey Bay Aquarium's Sea Otter Program. A newly-published study in Oryx--The International Journal of Conservation documents 15 years of research showing how the program helped restore the population in the coastal estuary. (2019-09-23)

The life aquatic made clear with freshwater lens
A Swansea University doctoral student has found a way to view the life of plants and animals in murky waters - by using a lens of freshwater. (2019-09-18)

How coastal mud holds the key to climate cooling gas
Bacteria found in muddy marshes, estuaries and coastal sediment synthesise one of the Earth's most abundant climate cooling gases -- according to new research from the University of East Anglia (UEA). Dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) is an important nutrient in marine environments with billions of tonnes produced annually by marine phytoplankton (microscopic plant-like cells), seaweed, corals and bacteria. (2019-08-19)

New mapping reveals lost west coast estuary habitat
An unprecedented survey has revealed the loss of about 85 percent of historical tidal wetlands in California, Oregon, and Washington. The report, published today in PLOS ONE, also highlights forgotten estuary acreage that might now be targeted for restoration. (2019-08-14)

Microbes have adapted to live on food that is hundreds of years old
Microbial communities living in deep aquatic sediments have adapted to survive on degraded organic matter, according to a study published in Applied and Environmental Microbiology and coauthored by professors at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville. (2019-08-13)

Climate change could shrink oyster habitat in California
Changes to dissolved oxygen levels, water temperature, and salinity could have an even greater impact than ocean acidification on oyster growth in estuaries and bays. (2019-08-06)

Can we feed 11 billion people while preventing the spread of infectious disease?
A new article published in Nature Sustainability describes how the increase in population and the need to feed everyone will give rise to human infectious disease, a situation the authors of the paper consider 'two of the most formidable ecological and public health challenges of the 21st century.' (2019-07-02)

Playing 'tag': Tracking movement of young oysters
A new publication in the journal Estuaries and Coasts investigates the use of a fluorescent dye to track movements of young oysters. The publication, 'Field mark-recapture of calcein-stained larval oysters (Crassostrea virginica) in a freshwater-dominated estuary', provides new knowledge on methods for tracking oysters in low salinity environments common to coastal waters, particularly in the northern Gulf of Mexico. (2019-06-24)

Risky business: New data show how manatees use shipping channels
A new publication in the journal Frontiers in Marine Science tracks West Indian manatee movements through nearshore and offshore ship channels in the north-central Gulf of Mexico. A new publication in the journal Frontiers in Marine Science tracks West Indian manatee movements through nearshore and offshore ship channels in the north-central Gulf of Mexico. (2019-06-18)

The cholera bacterium's 3-in-1 toolkit for life in the ocean
The cholera bacterium uses a grappling hook-like appendage to take up DNA, bind to nutritious surfaces and recognize 'family' members, EPFL scientists have found. These discoveries will advance our understanding of how the bacterium that causes cholera adapts and survives in its natural environment. (2019-06-10)

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