Current Ethanol News and Events | Page 3

Current Ethanol News and Events, Ethanol News Articles.
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Making a splash is all in the angle
Making a splash depends on the angle of a liquid as it hits and moves along a surface, according to a new study from Queen Mary University of London. (2019-06-05)

Potential solutions for limiting exposure to Candida auris in healthcare facilities
Researchers show that procedures used to contain Candida auris infection in an animal facility can potentially be applied to hospitals and nursing homes to limit its spread. (2019-05-23)

When the physics say 'don't follow your nose'
Engineers at Duke University are developing a smart robotic system for sniffing out pollution hotspots and sources of toxic leaks. Their approach enables a robot to incorporate calculations made on the fly to account for the complex airflows of confined spaces rather than simply 'following its nose.' (2019-04-18)

Brain growth inhibited by heavy alcohol use
New research in nonhuman primates shows that heavy use of alcohol can actually slow the rate of growth in developing brains. The study, to be published April 1, in the journal eNeuro, shows that heavy alcohol use reduced the rate of brain growth by 0.25 milliliters per year for every gram of alcohol consumed per kilogram of body weight. In human terms, that's the equivalent of four beers per day. The research involved rhesus macaque monkeys at the Oregon National Primate Research Center. (2019-04-01)

Building starch backbones for lab-grown meat using Lego pieces
A new technique to spin starch fibers using Lego pieces could have future applications for lab-grown 'clean' meat, according to a team of food scientists from Penn State and the University of Alabama. (2019-03-26)

Turning a porous material's color on and off with acid
Stable, color-changing compound shows potential for electronics, sensors and gas storage. (2019-02-08)

Study identifies new target to prevent, treat alcoholism
New research conducted at OHSU in Portland, Oregon, identifies a gene that could provide a new target for developing medication to prevent and treat alcoholism. Researchers unraveled a link between alcohol and how it modulates the levels of activity of this particular gene. Researchers discovered that when they increased the levels of the gene-encoded protein in mice, they reduced alcohol consumption by almost 50 percent without affecting the total amount of fluid consumed or their overall well-being. (2019-02-08)

Fiber sensors may leave the jacket on
Commercially-available fibers can also be protected by a jacket made of polyimide. The specific material was originally proposed for protecting the fiber at high temperatures. However, recent studies have demonstrated that the polyimide coating also provides transmission of ultrasound. The consequences are significant: researchers at Bar-Ilan University report in a new article that they are now able to perform opto-mechanical sensing and analysis of media that lie outside protected fibers, which can be deployed in proper scenarios. (2019-01-28)

Scientists discover new 'architecture' in corn
New research on the US's most economically important agricultural plant -- corn -- has revealed a different internal structure of the plant than previously thought, which can help optimize how corn is converted into ethanol. (2019-01-21)

Yeast makes ethanol to prevent metabolic overload
Why do some yeast cells produce ethanol? Scientists have wondered about this apparent waste of resources for decades. Now, University of Groningen scientists think they have a solution: yeast cells produce ethanol as a 'safety valve,' to prevent overload when their metabolic operation reaches a critical level. The implications of this new theory, published in Nature Metabolism on Jan. 7, could be far-reaching, as it also explains why cancer cells waste energy by producing lactate. (2019-01-07)

Buzzed flies reveal important step to intoxication
The alcohol in beverages acts much like an anesthetic. It creates a hyper 'buzzed' feeling first, and then sedation. But how? It turns out there is an important intermediate step that wasn't previously known. (2018-12-26)

'Frozen' copper behaves as noble metal in catalysis: study
A new study by scientists from the Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics shows that the electron structure of Cu can be changed, assisted by high energy plasma, making Cu exhibit significantly different catalytic behaviors than normal Cu in selective hydrogenation reactions. (2018-12-21)

Greener days ahead for carbon fuels
A discovery by researchers at the US Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and the Joint Center for Artificial Photosynthesis shows that recycling carbon dioxide into valuable chemicals and fuels can be economical and efficient -- all through a single copper catalyst. (2018-12-18)

Low-cost catalyst from U of T Engineering boosts hydrogen production from water
A future powered by carbon-free fuel depends on our ability to harness and store energy from renewable but intermittent sources, such as solar and wind. Now, a new catalyst developed at U of T Engineering gives a boost to a number of clean energy technologies that depend on producing hydrogen from water. (2018-12-12)

How fruit flies ended up in our fruit bowls
Fruit flies can be a scourge in our homes, but to date no-one has known how they became our uninvited lodgers. For decades, researchers have searched for their origins and now a Swedish-American research team has succeeded. They have also discovered that fruit flies in the wild are far more picky than their domesticated counterparts, a factor that long ago probably prompted the flies to move in with people. (2018-12-07)

Researchers advance biomass transformation process
Professor WANG Feng from the Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics of the Chinese Academy of Sciences and his colleagues from Peking University recently reported an efficient and novel catalytic method for the conversion of aqueous biomass fermentation broth to a water-immiscible product. (2018-12-05)

Wild yeasts may hold key to better wines from warmer climates
Researchers at the University of Adelaide have found yeasts that naturally occur on wine grapes may improve wines produced in warmer climates. Up until now the use of these 'natural' or 'wild' yeasts during the production process has mostly been discouraged by wine makers. (2018-12-02)

Camphorsulfonic acid-catalyzed Michael reaction of indoles with enones
Michael addition reaction is one of the most important and widely used reactions for making carbon-carbon or carbon-hetero bonds in organic synthesis. The reaction involves a facile attack of nucleophile to enone in a conjugated manner across a carbon-carbon double bond. The researchers herein report an expeditious camphor sulfonic acid-catalyzed Michael reaction for the synthesis of different 3-substituted indole derivatives at room temperature. (2018-11-28)

How to convert climate-changing carbon dioxide into plastics and other products
Rutgers scientists have developed catalysts that can convert carbon dioxide -- the main cause of global warming -- into plastics, fabrics, resins and other products. (2018-11-20)

Funded by new tax credits, US carbon-capture network could double global CO2 headed underground
Princeton University researchers have proposed a US pipeline network that would capture, transport and store underground up to 30 million metric tons of carbon dioxide emissions each year -- an amount equal to removing 6.5 million cars from the road. The authors found that the network infrastructure would only be possible if tax credits passed by Congress in 2018 to encourage investment in carbon capture-and-storage technology are coupled with low-interest government financing. (2018-09-25)

New method more than doubles sugar production from plants
EPFL chemists have developed a method that can significantly increase the yield of sugars from plants, improving the production of renewable fuels, chemicals, and materials. (2018-09-17)

Novel technique to treat endometrial cysts is safe and effective
A technique called catheter-based sclerotherapy is a safe and effective treatment for endometrial cysts and could help preserve fertility in patients, according to a new study. (2018-08-28)

Large scale preparation method of high quality SWNT sponges
In a NANO paper published in NANO, a group of researchers have developed a simple flame burning method to prepare single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) sponges on a large scale. The SWNT sponge has multifunctional properties and can be used in the fields of cleaning-up, sensing and energy storage. (2018-08-23)

Moderate drinking associated with lower risk of heart disease but consistency matters
Unstable drinking patterns over time may be associated with a higher risk of heart disease, whereas consistent moderate drinking within recommended health guidelines may have a cardioprotective effect, according to a study published in the open access journal BMC Medicine that examined data on 35,132 individuals. (2018-08-21)

Renewables could drastically cut tailpipe emissions
Ethanol and related gasoline replacement fuels produce fewer smog-causing chemicals. (2018-08-12)

Corncob ethanol may help cut China's greenhouse gas emissions
A new Biofuels, Bioproducts and Biorefining study has found that using ethanol from corncobs for energy production may help reduce greenhouse gas emissions in China, if used instead of starch-based ethanol. (2018-08-08)

Moderate alcohol consumption may boost male fertility
The question of whether alcohol intake affects male reproductive function is controversial. In a new Andrology study, moderate alcohol intake was linked with higher semen volume, sperm concentration, and total sperm count. (2018-07-18)

Study finds high health burdens of very high risk drinking
In an Addiction Biology study, the estimated prevalence of very high risk drinking level (VHRDL, defined as drinking >100 g of ethanol per day) in 13 European Union countries was 0.74-0.85 percent, with a risk of disease or injury of 13.5 per 100 people with VHRDL per year. (2018-07-18)

'Dancing' holes in droplets submerged in water-ethanol mixtures
Researchers from Tokyo Metropolitan University have observed the formation of holes that move by themselves in droplets of ionic liquids (IL) sitting inside water-ethanol mixtures. This curious, complex phenomenon is driven by an interplay between how ionic liquids dissolve, and how the boundary around the droplet fluctuates. Self-driven motion is a key feature of active matter, materials that use ambient energy to self-propel, with potential applications to drug delivery and nano-machine propulsion. (2018-06-30)

New catalyst upgrades carbon dioxide to fuels found by USTC
A research team led by professors University of Science and Technology of China and University of Toronto uncovered a catalysis strategy intermediates during CO2 electrochemical reduction reaction. (2018-06-25)

Substance in hair may be a marker for alcohol consumption
A new Drug Testing & Analysis study reveals that measuring levels of ethyl sulfate (EtS), a metabolite of ethanol, in the hair can be used to assess alcohol consumption. (2018-06-20)

Robot bloodhound tracks odors on the ground
Bloodhounds are famous for their ability to track scents over great distances. Now researchers have developed a modern-day bloodhound -- a robot that can rapidly detect odors from sources on the ground, such as footprints. The robot, reported in ACS Sensors, could even read a message written on the ground using odors as a barcode. (2018-06-20)

Research shows how a moderate dose of alcohol protects the heart
Results published in Cardiovascular Research suggest the effect is associated with activation of the enzyme ALDH2, which helps rid the organism of an aldehyde which is a toxic byproduct of alcohol digestion as much as it is a byproduct of heart cells submitted to stress. (2018-06-18)

Physicists developed self-propelled droplets that can act as programmable micro-carriers
In the life sciences, researchers are working to inject drugs or other molecules into a human body using tiny 'transport vehicles.' Researchers at the Saarland University and the University of Barcelona have shown in a model system that small emulsion droplets can be used as smart carriers. They have developed a method for producing self-propelled liquid droplets capable of providing spatially and temporally controlled delivery of a 'molecular load'. The study was published in 'Communications Physics'. (2018-06-07)

It's all in your head: Brain protein targeted for alcoholism cure
University of Houston chemist Joydip Das is reporting a cure for alcoholism could be found in a protein inside the brain that plays a big role in developing tolerance to drinking. (2018-06-05)

Rigorous study finds widely used treatment for infection fails young cancer patients
St. Jude Children's Research Hospital found ethanol-lock therapy failed to prevent new or recurring infections in cancer patients with central venous catheters and was associated with increased complications. (2018-06-05)

How binging creates alcohol tolerance in flies
Repeated exposure to large quantities of alcohol may lead to tolerance by reducing the activity of a protein that regulates communication between neurons, according to a study of fruit flies published in eNeuro. (2018-06-04)

Key enzyme for production of second-generation ethanol discovered in Brazilian Amazon
Protein encoded by gene found in microorganisms living in Amazon lake could boost efficiency on the sugarcane bagasse saccharification process, which makes for up to 50% of the global costs of cellulosic ethanol production. (2018-05-15)

Lignin -- A supergreen fuel for fuel cells
Researchers from the Laboratory of Organic Electronics at Linköping University have developed a fuel cell that uses lignin, a cheap by-product from paper manufacture and one of the most common biopolymers. (2018-05-14)

Tiny spiders, big color
There's plenty that's striking about Phoroncidia rubroargentea, a species of spider native to Madagascar, starting with their size -- at just three millimeters, they're barely larger than a few grains of salt. But the reason they caught Sarah Kariko's eye had to do with their color. Unlike many other species, which gradually see their color leach away when preserved in ethanol, the tiny spiders dazzled with brilliant, shimmering red and silver, even after decades in ethanol. (2018-05-11)

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