Current Ethics News and Events

Current Ethics News and Events, Ethics News Articles.
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Call to action for research ethics in the time of COVID-19 and BLM
In their paper 'Ethics of Research at the Intersection of COVID-19 and Black Lives Matter: A Call to Action,' UIC faculty authors highlight the historical issues that impact research involving Black populations. They also provide recommendations for researchers to ethically engage Black populations in research. The article is published online in the Journal of Medical Ethics. (2021-02-19)

It's morally wrong for rich nations to hoard COVID-19 vaccine
Rich nations should not engage in ''vaccine nationalism'' and keep the COVID-19 vaccine to themselves when poorer nations need them, according to Nicole Hassoun, professor of philosophy at Binghamton University, State University of New York. Hassoun's paper, ''Against Vaccine Nationalism,'' was published in the Journal of Medical Ethics. (2021-02-16)

Improved use of databases could save billions of euro in health care costs
Years of suffering and billions of euro in global health care costs, arising from osteoporosis-related bone fractures, could be eliminated using big data to target vulnerable patients, according to researchers at Lero, the Science Foundation Ireland Research Centre for Software. (2021-02-15)

If healthy people are purposefully infected with COVID-19 for the sake of science, they should be paid
Multidisciplinary team of international experts suggests participants should receive a ''substantial'' amount, be paid ethically. (2021-02-05)

Baylor study: Management without morals can lead to employees' unethical behavior
An organization that projects an ethical face but whose managers fail to respond to internal ethical situations sends mixed messages to its employees, which can lead to a lack of employees' moral courage and an increase in unethical behavior, according to a study led by a Baylor University researcher. (2021-01-28)

Offer COVID-19 vaccines to pregnant or breastfeeding people
People who are pregnant, breastfeeding or trying to conceive should be offered the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) vaccine based on ethical grounds, argue authors of a commentary in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal) (2021-01-27)

Young people embrace new model of teaching sexual consent, study finds
Sexual health charity Brook has adopted these latest research findings in its teaching methods (2020-12-11)

Bosses need appreciation, too
'Tis the season to be grateful, even for your boss, according to a recent A new study suggests that when supervisors feel appreciated, it gives them a boost of energy and optimism. In the end, that's good for employees and the organization's bottom line. (2020-12-10)

Poverty and honesty are not opposites
Does poverty cause lying? An international research team led by behavioral economist Agne Kajackaite from the WZB Berlin Social Science Center, Suparee Boonmanunt (Mahidol University, Bangkok) and Stephan Meier (Columbia Business School) examined whether poverty-stricken individuals were especially prone to acts of dishonesty. The researchers ran a field experiment with rice farmers in Thailand which incentivized cheating during a card game. They found that poverty itself did not cause individuals to act dishonestly. (2020-11-27)

Accounting for 'research fatigue' in human studies
An article published in Bioethics examines the topic of research fatigue--or psychological and emotional exhaustion both towards and as a result of participating in research. The article is meant to initiate a conversation about research fatigue experienced by marginalized communities and how the research community should respond to it. (2020-11-18)

Field research has changed, and so should ethical guidelines, Brown professor says
A social scientist at Brown is calling on research institutions, leading scientific journals and national professional associations to establish new ethical standards that protect human subjects from emotional, financial and political manipulation. (2020-11-16)

Studies outline key ethical questions surrounding brain-computer interface tech
Brain-computer interface (BCI) technologies are no longer hypothetical, yet there are fundamental aspects of the technology that remain unaddressed by both ethicists and policy-makers. Two new papers address these issues by outlining the outstanding ethical issues, offering guidance for addressing those issues, and offering particular insight into the field of BCI tech for cognitive enhancement. (2020-11-10)

Pay people to get COVID-19 jab to ensure widespread coverage, says leading ethicist
Governments should consider incentivising people to get a COVID-19 jab, when the vaccine becomes available, to achieve the required level of herd immunity--which could be up to 80%+ of the population--and stamp out the infection, argues a leading ethicist in an opinion piece accepted for publication in the Journal of Medical Ethics. (2020-11-05)

Uncertainties key to balancing flood risk and cost in elevating houses
What do you have on your 2020 Bingo Card? Wildfire, heat wave, global pandemic, or flooding? If it's flooding, then it's a good bet it will happen in many places in the U.S. sometime during the year. (2020-10-26)

Paper: Congress must clarify limits of gene-editing technologies
How the next Congress decides to handle the issue editing human sperm and eggs will affect the science, ethics and financing of genomic editing for decades to come, said Jacob S. Sherkow, a professor of law at Illinois who studies the ethical and policy implications of advanced biotechnologies. (2020-10-21)

Study: Women want more info on reproductive care restrictions from religious hospitals
Researchers from the University of Chicago and the University of California, San Francisco found that women value clear information shared early from their health care providers to help them anticipate religious restrictions before their care becomes urgent. (2020-10-01)

COVID-19 pandemic has created flood of potentially substandard research
The COVID-19 pandemic has created a flood of potentially substandard research amid the rush to publish, with a string of papers retracted or under a cloud and a surge in submissions to pre-print servers where fewer quality checks are made, a leading ethicist has warned in the Journal of Medical Ethics. (2020-10-01)

Placenta is initiated first, as cells of a fertilised egg divide and specialise
The first stages of placental development take place days before the embryo starts to form in human pregnancies. The finding highlights the importance of healthy placental development in pregnancy, and could lead to future improvements in fertility treatments such as IVF, and a better understanding of placental-related diseases in pregnancy. (2020-09-24)

New issue of Daedalus features essays from sixteen climate change witnesses
A new Issue of Daedalus -- the journal of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences -- brings together essays by sixteen prominent climate change witnesses, representing multiple fields, backgrounds, and generations. (2020-09-24)

Study shows keeping gratitude journal reduces gossip, incivility in workplace
Gratitude interventions in the workplace can help employee well-being and managers can use these efforts to foster more respectful behavior in their teams. (2020-09-22)

CU researchers call for national ethics guidelines when student health surveys uncover suicide-risk
In a report published today in the highly influential American Journal of Bioethics, the researchers describe a student health survey team that discovered a Colorado school with extremely high rates of suicide risk, and a lack of ethical guidance on whether or how to intervene. The researchers are calling for national ethics guidelines when student health surveys uncover suicide-risk ''hot spots.'' (2020-09-18)

Future of genomics at risk without greater public trust in how genetic data is shared
The largest ever survey on global public attitudes towards genomic research and data sharing suggests that work is needed to raise levels of public trust in how genetic data is used in order for that data to fulfil its promise to advance human health and medicine. (2020-09-17)

Do-it-yourself COVID-19 vaccines fraught with public health problems
''Citizen scientists'' developing homemade COVID-19 vaccines may believe they're inoculating themselves against the ongoing pandemic, but the practice of self-experimentation with do-it-yourself medical innovations is fraught with legal, ethical and public health issues, says a new paper co-written by University of Illinois law professor Jacob S. Sherkow. (2020-09-17)

Male circumcision campaigns in Africa to fight HIV are a form of cultural imperialism
World Health Organization-recommended campaigns to circumcise millions of African boys and men to reduce HIV transmission are based more on systemic racism and 'neocolonialism' than sound scientific research, according to a critical appraisal published in Developing World Bioethics. (2020-09-10)

Paper ballots, risk-limiting audits can help defend elections and democracy, study finds
With just over two months before the 2020 election, three professors at the Indiana University Kelley School of Business offer a comprehensive review of how other nations are seeking to protect their democratic institutions and presents how a multifaceted, targeted approach is needed to achieve that goal in the U.S., where intelligence officials have warned that Russia and other rivals are again attempting to undermine our democracy. (2020-09-02)

An embedded ethics approach for AI development
The increasing use of AI (artificial intelligence) in the development of new medical technologies demands greater attention to ethical aspects. An interdisciplinary team at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) advocates the integration of ethics from the very beginning of the development process of new technologies. Alena Buyx, Professor of Ethics in Medicine and Health Technologies, explains the embedded ethics approach. (2020-09-01)

Ethical recommendations for triage of COVID-19 patients
An international expert group led by Mathias Wirth, Professor of Systematic Theology and Ethics at the University of Bern, has developed recommendations for avoiding triage of COVID-19 patients in extreme situations. The recommendations should support medical personnel in difficult decisions during a second wave of the infection and ensure better patient care. (2020-07-16)

New in the Hastings Center Report: Health, race, and society during Covid-19
The latest issue is devoted to essays that examine how the pandemic has highlighted connections between health and social structures--concerning not just access to health care but also conditions of living that affect health, from inequality to political and environmental conditions. (2020-07-09)

What ethical models for autonomous vehicles don't address - and how they could be better
There's a fairly large flaw in the way that programmers are currently addressing ethical concerns related to artificial intelligence and autonomous vehicles (AVs). Namely, existing approaches don't account for the fact that people might try to use AVs to do something bad. (2020-07-06)

Illinois professor proposes guide for developing common data science approaches
University of Illinois information sciences professor Victoria Stodden proposes a way to develop recognized data science processes for research. (2020-06-25)

New in Ethics and Human Research
Covid-19: Why Challenge Trials of Vaccines Could be Ethical, Despite Severe Risks, Equitably Sharing the Benefits and Burdens of Research. Early-view articles and the May-June 2020 issue. (2020-06-10)

Responding to COVID-19: New early-view articles in the Hastings Center report
Responding to COVID-19: Vaccine rationing and social justice; ethical challenges for nurses; and more. Early-view essays in the Hastings Center Report. (2020-06-04)

COVID-19 vaccine development: New guidelines for ethical approach to infecting trial volunteers
Allowing consenting volunteers to be deliberately infected with COVID-19 for the purposes of developing a vaccine could be done ethically and potentially speed up its development, a University of Warwick researcher has argued in new research. (2020-05-27)

#Thisisourlane: How physicians can take action to reduce gun violence
As strategies to curb gun violence at the federal level have stalled, leaders in primary care and health policy have identified the role doctors can play in national gun safety efforts and the prevention of firearm suicide. In this pair of recommendation papers, clinicians place themselves at the front lines of this public health issue and offer a call to action for the medical community. Both papers lay out a grassroots course of action to help physicians engage with their patients and policy makers. (2020-05-12)

Perspective: Rapid repurposing of drugs for COVID-19
Given the rapid spread of COVID-19 and its relatively high mortality, filling the gap for coronavirus-specific drugs is urgent. (2020-05-08)

Position statement addresses difficult issue: allocating scare resources in COVID-19 era
The COVID-19 pandemic has placed unprecedented pressure on societies worldwide, given the pandemic's rapid, often deadly spread. In health care, the pandemic has raised the pressing question of how society should allocate scarce resources during a crisis. This is the question experts addressed today in a new position statement published by the American Geriatrics Society (AGS) in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society (DOI: 10.1111/jgs.16537). (2020-05-06)

Crises are no excuse for lowering scientific standards, say ethicists
Ethicists from Carnegie Mellon and McGill universities are calling on the global research community to resist treating the urgency of the current COVID-19 outbreak as grounds for making exceptions to rigorous research standards in pursuit of treatments and vaccines. (2020-04-23)

New in the Hastings Center Report: A call to confront mistrust in the US health care system
'For those who have faced exploitation and discrimination at the hands of physicians, the medical profession, and medical institutions, trust is a tall order and, in many cases, would be naïve,' writes Laura Specker Sullivan in 'Trust, Risk, and Race in American Medicine.' (2020-02-24)

Social accounting, a different perspective when analysing public spending efficiency
A UPV/EHU's research group has shown that it is possible to express in terms of money the social value generated by a hospital. It has calculated the social added value index of a hospital for the first time taking the Osakidetza [Basque Autonomous Community Public Health Service] Santa Marina Hospital as the basis. This analysis provides the hospital with information for the purpose of implementing improvements and could be important when it comes to drawing comparisons with other hospitals. (2020-02-21)

Pilot program aims to improve reproducibility, utility, and ethics of biomedical research
Addressing the widespread concern over transparency and reproducibility in biomedical research, one of the largest institutions in German science has begun to provide a framework, interventions, and incentives for improving the quality and value of translational research. The program is described by its leader, Ulrich Dirnagl of Berlin Institute of Health (BIH), and colleagues in a new article publishing on Feb. 11 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology. (2020-02-11)

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