Current Europa News and Events

Current Europa News and Events, Europa News Articles.
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Parasites' dispersal capacity and rates of genetic introgression--a study
The results, recently published in the journal Communications Biology, have important applications in the field of coevolutionary biology (2021-02-19)

Testing the waters: Analyzing different solid states of water on other planets and moons
Aside from regular ice, water can exist in the form of peculiar solids called clathrate hydrates, which trap small gaseous molecules. They play a large role in the evolution of atmospheres, but predicting their presence in cryogenic temperatures is difficult. In a recent study, scientists from Okayama University developed statistical mechanics theory to determine their presence in Pluto and some of Jupiter's and Saturn's satellites, providing valuable information to revise existing interpretations. (2021-01-19)

Investigating the carbon intensity of ferries
Ferry emissions are over-proportional with respect to the number of these ships. Half of the European ferry emissions stem from the Mediterranean, this largely reflecting a greater number of ships operating in this sea. Which factors affects ferry carbon intensity and energy efficiency? New insights and perspective from a study realized by the CMCC Foundation in the framework of GUTTA project activities. (2020-12-17)

Powerful electrical events quickly alter surface chemistry on Mars, other planetary bodies
On Earth, dust particles are viewed mainly in terms of their physical effects, like erosion. But, in exotic locales from Mars to Venus to Jupiter's icy moon Europa, electrical effects can affect the chemical composition of a planetary body's surface and atmosphere in a relatively short time, according to new research from Washington University in St. Louis. (2020-12-14)

ECDC and WHO call for improved HIV testing in Europe
The number of people living with undiagnosed HIV is increasing in the WHO European Region. According to data published today by ECDC and the WHO/Europe, more than 136 000 people were newly diagnosed in 2019 - roughly 20% of these diagnoses were in the EU/EAA and 80% in the eastern part of the European Region. Every second HIV diagnosis (53%) happens at a late stage of the infection, when the immune system has already started to fail. (2020-11-26)

Researchers model source of eruption on Jupiter's moon Europa
A new model shows how brine on Jupiter's moon Europa can migrate within the icy shell to form pockets of salty water that erupt to the surface when freezing. The findings, which are important for the upcoming Europa Clipper mission, may explain cryovolcanic eruptions across icy bodies in the solar system. (2020-11-10)

Environmental factors affect the distribution of Iberian spiders
Southern small-leaved oak forests are the habitats with a higher level of spider endemism in the Iberian Peninsula, according to an article published in the journal Biodiversity and Conservation. The study analyses the factors that affect biodiversity patterns of spider communities in the national park network of Spain, and explains the role of the environmental factors in the distribution of the biodiversity of this faunistic group in the peninsular territory. (2020-11-09)

New study shows that football fixture pile-ups are forcing layers and coaches to change
Footballers may be fitter than ever before but congested fixture lists are forcing players to pace themselves while team managers are forced to increasingly juggle their resources, according to new research on elite level men's football by a University of Huddersfield academic. (2020-11-05)

New research reveals risky sexual behavior and STIs are rising despite COVID-19 pandemic
New research launched at the 29th EADV Congress, EADV Virtual, has found that despite the COVID-19 (SARS-CoV-2) lockdown restrictions, diagnosis of sexually transmitted infections (STIs), including gonorrhoea, secondary syphilis and mycoplasma genitalium (MG), have increased. (2020-10-31)

Most people infected with SARS-CoV-2 develop symptoms
While some people who contract SARS-CoV-2 infections never experience any symptoms, there remains disagreement about what proportion of total infections these cases represent. A new study published in the open-access journal PLOS Medicine by Diana Buitrago-Garcia at the University of Bern, Switzerland and colleagues suggests that true asymptomatic cases of SARS-CoV-2 comprise a minority of infections. (2020-09-22)

Is rheumatoid arthritis two different diseases?
While disease activity improves over time for most rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients, long-term outcomes only improve in RA patients with autoantibodies, according to a new study published this week in PLOS Medicine by Xanthe Matthijssen of Leiden University Medical Center, Netherlands, and colleagues. The findings add to a growing body of evidence that RA with and without autoantibodies are two distinct conditions. (2020-09-22)

Hubble captures crisp new image of Jupiter and Europa
This latest image of Jupiter, taken by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope on Aug. 25, 2020, was captured when the planet was 653 million kilometres from Earth. Hubble's sharp view is giving researchers an updated weather report on the monster planet's turbulent atmosphere, including a remarkable new storm brewing, and a cousin of the Great Red Spot changing color -- again. The new image also features Jupiter's icy moon Europa. (2020-09-17)

Jupiter's moons could be warming each other
The gravitational push and pull by Jupiter's moons could account for more warming than the gas giant Jupiter alone. (2020-09-10)

The most sensitive instrument in the search for life in space comes from Bern
Researchers at the University of Bern have developed the highly sensitive ORIGIN instrument, which can provide proof of the smallest amounts of traces of life, for future space missions. Space agencies such as NASA have already expressed interest in testing ORIGIN for future missions. The instrument may be used on missions to the ice moons of Europa (Jupiter) and Enceladus (Saturn), for example. (2020-08-19)

Huge ring-like structure on Ganymede's surface may have been caused by violent impact
Image data reanalysis by researchers from Kobe University and the National Institute of Technology, Oshima College have revealed that ancient tectonic troughs are concentrically distributed across almost the entire surface of Ganymede. Computer simulation results suggest that this giant crater could have resulted from the impact of an asteroid with a 150km radius. If so, this the largest impact structure identified in the solar system so far. (2020-08-07)

Viral hepatitis: Europe needs to close the testing gap
Approximately four in five people living with hepatitis B and three out of four people with hepatitis C infection across the European Union and European Economic Area (EU/EEA) and the UK have not yet been diagnosed. This is a major obstacle on the way towards the Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) for health in 2030 as highlighted by ECDC on occasion of World Hepatitis Day. (2020-07-27)

Closing the gap: finding undiagnosed hepatitis C infections after blood transfusions
What is the incidence of viral hepatitis caused by blood transfusions before and after Sweden introduced screening of blood in the early 1990s? In an article published in Eurosurveillance ahead of World Hepatitis Day on 28 July, the authors also try to estimate how many people of those who were infected with hepatitis B and C through blood transfusion still live with undiagnosed hepatitis. (2020-07-23)

Combining handwashing, mask-wearing and social distancing best in preventing COVID-19
Both self-imposed prevention measures such as hand-washing, mask-wearing and social distancing, as well as government-imposed social distancing can help mitigate and delay a COVID-19 epidemic, according to a new study published this week in PLOS Medicine by Alexandra Teslya of University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands and colleagues. (2020-07-21)

Major study shows prostate cancer treatment has significant impact on quality of life
Findings from the first international prostate cancer quality of life study conducted by patients themselves reports that significant numbers of men treated for the disease are struggling with continence and sexual problems after treatment. Results suggest that any treatment apart from active surveillance may negatively affect quality of life, and indicate that for many men these effects may be greater than previously thought. (2020-07-17)

Scientists find a switch which may make prostate cancer spread
Scientists have found a switch which is associated with prostate cancers spreading or forming metastases (secondary tumours). The researchers caution that this work is still at an early stage, and needs further investigation to see if it applies to all prostate cancers. Up to 15% of patients have high risk prostate cancers, potentially leading to significantly increased mortality over time. The work is presented at the virtual European Association of Urology congress. (2020-07-16)

The magnetic history of ice
The history of our planet has been written, among other things, in the periodic reversal of its magnetic poles. Scientists at the Weizmann Institute of Science propose a new means of reading this historic record: in ice. Their findings could lead to a refined probing ice cores and, in the future, might be applied to understanding the magnetic history of other bodies in our solar system, including Mars and Jupiter's moon Europa. (2020-06-28)

Randomization of provisional vs two-stent techniques in complex bifurcation lesions
Aim: The present study aimed to assess the benefits of two-stent techniques for patients with DEFINITION criteria-defined complex coronary bifurcation lesions. Methods and Results: In total, 653 patients with complex bifurcation lesions at 49 international centres were randomly assigned to undergo the systematic two-stent technique (two-stent group) or provisional stenting (provisional group). The primary endpoint was the composite of target lesion failure... (2020-06-25)

DynamX Bioadaptor, a novel 'uncaging' platform for coronary artery revascularisation
Drug Eluting Stents (DES) are the mainstay of coronary artery disease treatment. Although DES design iterations have reduced MACE in the first year after PCI, beyond 1-year, a persistent 2-3% annualized event rate without plateau is observed. The DynamX™ Novolimus-Eluting Coronary Bioadaptor System is a 71 micron thin, cobalt-chromium platform with a novel ''uncaging'' mechanism of the circumferential rings after 6 months while maintaining axial links following uncaging. (2020-06-25)

External ultrasound therapy of calcific aortic stenosis -- First-in-man
Cardiawave (France) has developed a Non-Invasive Ultrasound Therapy (NIUT) for the treatment of cardio-valvular diseases such as aortic stenosis. This is the primary valve disease in adults and one of the leading causes of cardiovascular death worldwide which affects 10 million people in Europe and the USA. (2020-06-25)

Routine revascularization vs. medical therapy: Meta-analysis and review
Revascularization is often performed in patients with stable ischemic heart disease (SIHD). However, whether revascularization reduces death and other cardiovascular outcomes is uncertain. Cumulative evidence from this meta-analysis of randomized trials, including the recently published ISCHEMIA... (2020-06-25)

Comprehensive evaluation of mitral valve-in-valve and valve-in-ring
Mitral valve-in-valve (ViV) and valve-in-ring (ViR) are alternatives to surgical reoperation in patients with recurrent mitral valve failure after previous surgical valve repair or replacement. Our aim was to perform a large-scale analysis examining mid-term outcomes after mitral ViV and ViR. (2020-06-25)

Two-year outcomes after revascularisation deferral based on FFR or iFR measurements
Revascularisation deferral (i.e. decision to treat medically) is a key aspect of physiology-based coronary revascularisation. In the post-ISCHEMIA trial scenario, it is key to understand whether decision-making with hyperaemic- and non-hyperaemic indices lead to similar rates of revascularization, and if this happens over the shifting age range of coronary patients... (2020-06-25)

PCR State-of-the-art lecture on 'The resurgence of renal denervation'
Renal denervation (RDN) represents a device-based hypertension treatment intended to lower sympathetic activity. Only a few years ago, RDN was written off as ineffective after results of the sham-controlled SYMPLICITY HTN-3 trial failed to confirm early trials' reports of significant BP reductions in patients resistant to guideline- based combination drug therapy. (2020-06-25)

The burden of non-COVID patients: Caring for the left-behind
Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has exposed gaps in health care systems. Recognition of the impacts of these gaps offers an opportunity for health care professionals working with political institutions to improve the intersection between health and society. Health care systems will need to simultaneously deal with non-COVID-19 chronic conditions (''the people left behind'') as well as maintain hospital facilities at a high level of preparedness for urgent care pandemic patients. (2020-06-25)

Effect of ultrasound renal denervation after crossover from sham in RADIANCE-HTN SOLO
Control of hypertension represents an unmet need globally, and RDN is an 'adherence-independent' adjunctive therapy to medications. The RADIANCE-HTN SOLO trial was a multicenter randomized controlled trial that demonstrated the blood pressure lowering effect of endovascular ultrasound-based renal denervation compared with a sham control. (2020-06-25)

Merits of revascularisation and medical treatment for chronic coronary syndromes
There are two treatment goals for patients with chronic coronary syndromes: reducing the risk of hard outcomes (i.e., death, myocardial infarction) and improving health outcomes (i.e. angina symptoms, quality of life). Several drugs address these objectives, but what about invasive interventions such as coronary angiography and revascularization? (2020-06-25)

Are planets with oceans common in the galaxy? It's likely, NASA scientists find
Several years ago, planetary scientist Lynnae Quick began to wonder whether any of the more than 4,000 known exoplanets, or planets beyond our solar system, might resemble some of the watery moons around Jupiter and Saturn. (2020-06-18)

Detecting antibodies with glowing proteins, thread and a smartphone
To defend the body, the immune system makes proteins known as antibodies that latch onto the perceived threat, be it HIV, the new coronavirus or, as is the case in autoimmune disease, part of the body itself. In a new proof-of-concept study in ACS Sensors, researchers describe a new system for detecting antibodies within a pinprick of blood within minutes, using an unlikely combination of cotton thread, glowing proteins and a smartphone camera.  (2020-06-17)

An analysis of psychological meta-analyses reveals a reproducibility problem
Meta-analysis research studies in psychology aren't always reproducible due to a lack of transparency of reporting in the meta-analysis process, according to a new study published May 27, 2020, in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Esther Maassen of Tilburg University, the Netherlands, and colleagues. (2020-05-27)

Virus genomes help to explain why a major livestock disease has re-emerged in Europe
Livestock diseases like bluetongue virus (BTV) can have devastating economic and health consequences, but their origins can be difficult to establish. New research published in the open access journal PLOS Biology this week shows that the recent re-emergence of BTV in France could have been caused by human activities, based on the virus' unusual genetic makeup. (2020-04-28)

Male-killing bacteria linked to butterfly color changes
Like many poisonous animals, the African monarch butterfly's orange, white and black pattern warns predators that it is toxic. Warning patterns like this are usually consistent across individuals to help predators learn to avoid them. However, a recent study, published February 27 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology, shows how a population of African monarch butterflies (Danaus chrysippus) breaks this rule and has highly variable warning patterns. (2020-02-28)

Factories reimagined
Factories in the future will definitely look different than today. As the fourth industrial revolution transforms manufacturing from mass production to mass customization, factory workers will increasingly need to apply new ICT to work remotely, collaborate with robots or use AI-based assistants, to increase their performance while developing further their creative, innovative and improvisational skills. Advanced technologies offer factory workers unprecedented opportunities to organize their jobs in a more autonomous way. Industrial work, jobs and skills are therefore being radically rethought. (2020-02-15)

Domesticated wheat has complex parentage
Certain types of domesticated wheat have complicated origins, with genetic contributions from wild and cultivated wheat populations on opposite sides of the Fertile Crescent. Terence Brown and colleagues at the University of Manchester report these findings in a new paper published Jan. 22, 2020, in the open-access journal PLOS ONE. (2020-01-22)

Experiment suggests the best ways to tackle invasive Oregon grape in Belgian coastal dunes
Despite being a protected high conservation value habitat, the Atlantic coastal dunes are severely impacted by invasive species. In the Belgian coastal dunes, Oregon grape is one of the worst invaders, so Belgian scientists conducted an experiment to provide recommendations for all affected countries. By publishing their discovery in the open-access journal NeoBiota, the research team aims to boost international collaboration on the development of methods for invasive species control in conservation habitats. (2019-12-12)

NASA's temp check on Tropical Storm Belna finds heavy rainfall potential
Cold cloud top temperatures can tell forecasters if a tropical cyclone has the potential to generate heavy rainfall, and that is exactly what NASA's Aqua satellite found when it observed the temperatures in Tropical Cyclone Belna over northwestern Madagascar. (2019-12-10)

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