Current Eve News and Events

Current Eve News and Events, Eve News Articles.
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Sewage study shows which countries like to party hard
The Netherlands, United States, Australia and New Zealand are consuming the highest amounts of designer 'party' drugs, according to wastewater samples taken from eight countries over the New Year period. (2021-02-21)

A speed limit also applies in the quantum world
Even in the world of the smallest particles with their own special rules, things cannot proceed infinitely fast. Physicists at the University of Bonn have now shown what the speed limit is for complex quantum operations. The study also involved scientists from MIT, the universities of Hamburg, Cologne and Padua, and the Jülich Research Center. The results are important for the realization of quantum computers, among other things. (2021-02-19)

Astronomers uncover mysterious origins of 'super-Earths'
Mini-Neptunes and super-Earths up to four times the size of our own are the most common exoplanets orbiting stars beyond our solar system. Until now, super-Earths were thought to be the rocky cores of mini-Neptunes whose gassy atmospheres were blown away. In a new study published in The Astrophysical Journal, astronomers from McGill University show that some of these exoplanets never had gaseous atmospheres to begin with, shedding new light on their mysterious origins. (2021-02-10)

A 'super-puff' planet like no other
A Canadian-led team of astronomers discovers that the core mass of exoplanet WASP-107b is much lower than previously thought possible for a gas-giant planet. (2021-01-18)

High-ranking male hyenas have better chances with females because they are less "stressed"
Scientists from the Leibniz-IZW have found that interacting with other males is more ''stressful'' for low-ranking than for high-ranking male spotted hyenas. This restricts the time and energy low-ranking males can invest in courting females and is therefore a key factor for lower reproductive success than their high-ranking rivals. This mechanism seems to be more important in determining the number and quality of offspring than physical traits such as attractiveness and fighting ability. (2021-01-18)

What lessons can medicine learn from Father Christmas?
As Father Christmas gears up for the busiest 24 hours of his year, what skills does he use to get a seemingly impossible job done effectively and safely - and can they be applied to medicine? (2020-12-16)

Study finds gamblers ignore important information when placing bet
People with gambling problems are less likely to consider important information that could prevent them from losing, according to new research published today from the UBC's Centre for Gambling Research. (2020-12-03)

Why does it matter if most Republican voters still think Biden lost?
As President-elect Joe Biden and his administrative team officially begin the transition process, only about 20 percent of Republican voters consider him the true winner of the election. Nearly half of all respondents--48 percent--still expect President Donald Trump to be inaugurated for a second term on January 20, despite plenty of indicators to the contrary. Those are among the findings of the latest Bright Line Watch (November) survey--conducted by political science faculty at the University of Rochester, Chicago, and Dartmouth. (2020-12-02)

Minorities value, perceive, and experience professionalism differently than their peers
Marginalized groups of people value professionalism more -- and are more likely to leave a job at an institution due to issues of professionalism -- compared to their white, male counterparts, according to a Penn Medicine study of staff, faculty, and students who were affiliated with a large, academic health system in 2015 and 2017. (2020-11-24)

Experts see substantial danger to democratic stability around 2020 election
The latest Bright Line Watch survey finds substantial risks to the legitimacy of the election, including potential problems in the casting and counting of votes, the Electoral College, and in the resolution of electoral disputes. (2020-10-30)

Forecasting elections with a model of infectious diseases
Election forecasting is an innately challenging endeavor, with results that can be difficult to interpret and may leave many questions unanswered after close races unfold. In a paper publishing in SIAM Review, researchers borrowed ideas from epidemiology to develop a new method for forecasting elections. The team hoped the multidisciplinary nature of their infectious disease model could expand the community that engages with polling data and raise research questions from a new perspective. (2020-10-28)

Player behavior in the online game EVE Online may reflect real world country
Virtual worlds may reflect social and economic behavior in the real world, according to a study published October 21, 2020 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Andres M. Belaza and colleagues from Ghent University, Belgium. (2020-10-21)

Targeting our second brain to fight diabetes
Patrice Cani (UCLouvain) and Claude Knauf (INSERM) have discovered a 'jammer' that blocks communication between the gut and the brain, thus preventing proper regulation of sugar and causing insulin resistance in people with diabetes. They also discovered that a lipid produced by our body helps prevent this dysfunction and regulate sugar level, thus mitigating diabetes and intestinal inflammation. These discoveries, published in the scientific journal GUT, are major, because today one in two Europeans is overweight and one in ten has diabetes. (2020-10-06)

"Grown-ups don't always get it right, you know"
When 11 year old Oscar told his mum, Dr Emma Maynard that ''grown-ups don't always get it right, you know'' the statement struck a chord with the Senior Lecturer in Education at the University of Portsmouth. (2020-08-04)

Widening cancer gene testing is cost effective and could prevent millions of cancer cases
Screening entire populations for breast and ovarian cancer gene mutations could prevent millions more breast and ovarian cancer cases across the world compared to current clinical practice, according to an international study led by Queen Mary University of London. The research also shows that it is cost effective in high and upper-middle income countries. (2020-07-16)

No laughing matter
A new study involving a scientific analysis of the prevalence of 'LOL' in students' text messages demonstrates important potential applications for classroom learning. The study, 'Linguistics in General Education: Expanding Linguistics Course Offerings through Core Competency Alignment,' will be published in the June 2020 issue of the scholarly journal Language. An advance version of the article may be found at https://www.linguisticsociety.org/sites/default/files/LSA962101_0.pdf. (2020-05-27)

Personalised ovarian cancer risk prediction reduces worries
Offering personalized ovarian cancer risk prediction to women shows that 98 per cent of participants felt less worried after finding out their ovarian cancer risk status, according to a study led by Queen Mary University of London. (2020-05-19)

Helping prevent eco-interventions from backfiring
Drastic ecosystem interventions like eradicating an unwanted species can sometimes backfire, but new University of Queensland-led modelling may help to avoid these ecological hiccups. Dr Matthew Adams, from UQ's School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, said despite all good intentions, ecological interventions can have devastating consequences. (2020-01-28)

NASA satellite tracks tropical storm Phanfone into the South China Sea
Tropical Storm Phanfone brought typhoon-force winds and heavy rains across sections of the Philippines on Christmas Eve and Christmas day. Phanfone is known as Ursula in the Philippines. Now the storm has moved into the South China Sea and NASA's Terra satellite captured an image of the tropical cyclone. (2019-12-26)

Trashed farmland could be a conservation treasure
Low-productivity agricultural land could be transformed into millions of hectares of conservation reserve across the world, according to University of Queensland-led research. The research team proposed a new way of understanding the conservation value of ''uncontested lands'' - areas where agricultural productivity is low. (2019-12-10)

Scientists use crabs to validate popular method to identify unknown human brain neurons
A crab's nervous system could help scientists learn what causes single neurons in the human brain to become 'out of whack,' which can contribute to the development of neurological diseases like Alzheimer's disease. Knowing exactly how a single neuron operates among the billions housed in the human brain could one day help scientists design innovative ways to prevent and treat these diseases, such as targeted therapies. (2019-12-06)

COP25 special collection: Keep climate change impacts under control by making biodiversity a focus
Under a 2°Celsius warming scenario, 80 to 83% of language areas in New Guinea -- home to the greatest biological and linguistic diversity of any tropical island on Earth -- will experience decreases in the diversity of useful plant species by 2070, according to a new study. (2019-11-27)

NASA gets infrared view of Atlantic Halloween subtropical storm
The latest addition to the Atlantic Ocean hurricane season developed quickly. NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the eastern North Atlantic Ocean on Halloween and provided forecasters with an infrared view of Subtropical Storm Rebekah. (2019-10-31)

UBC study finds siblings of problem gamblers also impulsive, prone to risk-taking
Biological siblings of people with gambling disorder also display markers of increased impulsivity and risk-taking, according to a new UBC psychology study. The findings, published today in Neuropsychopharmacology, suggest people with gambling disorder -- a psychiatric term for serious gambling problems -- may have pre-existing genetic vulnerabilities to the illness. (2019-10-09)

Ericsson activates 5G NSA technology at 5TONIC open innovation lab
The deployment, successfully achieved by Ericsson and Telefónica, includes a new 5G Massive MIMO Radio running on 3.5GHz band, along with virtual Evolved Packet Core and User Data Consolidation. (2019-06-21)

The 'Forbidden' planet has been found in the 'Neptunian Desert'
An exoplanet smaller than Neptune with its own atmosphere has been discovered in the Neptunian Desert, by an international collaboration of astronomers, with the University of Warwick taking a leading role. (2019-05-28)

Artificial womb technology breaks its 4 minute mile
A major advancement in pioneering technology based around the use of an artificial womb to save extremely premature babies is being hailed as a medical and biotechnological breakthrough. (2019-03-26)

Pushing MYC inhibition closer to the clinic
VHIO-born spin-off Peptomyc S.L. has developed and preclinically validated mini-protein MYC inhibitor as effective and tolerable against notoriously difficult-to-treat lung cancer subtype. (2019-03-20)

Scientists warn about the dangerous interaction of plant protection products
A recent study by researchers at the Estonian University of Life Sciences, Ghend, and Cardiff University found that the toxins used in agriculture to combat insect pests and fungi can be more dangerous than expected. (2019-03-12)

Ducks offer researchers a unique opportunity to study human touch
If it walks like a duck (or a goose or a swan), it can find food in mud without seeing or smelling it. These waterfowl bills are covered in skin that's a lot like the sensitive skin on the palms of our hands, and it can feel food in mud and murky water. Slav Bagriantsev, Eve Schneider, and Evan Anderson at Yale University are researching duck skin to learn more about how our sense of touch works. (2019-03-01)

A trap for positrons
For the first time, scientists from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) and the Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics (IPP) have succeeded in losslessly guiding positrons, the antiparticles of electrons, into a magnetic field trap. This is an important step towards creating a matter-antimatter plasma of electrons and positrons, like the plasmas believed to occur near neutron stars and black holes. In an interview, Dr. Eve Stenson presents her research work. (2019-02-28)

Better safeguards for sensitive information
Despite being the most advanced quantum technology, secure encryption of information units based on a method called quantum key distribution (QKD) is currently limited by the channel's capacity to send or share secret bits. In a recent study published in EPJ D, Gan Wang, who is affiliated with both Peking University, Bejing, China, and the University of York, UK, and colleagues show how to better approach the secret key capacity by improving the channel's lower boundary. (2019-01-28)

Better living through improved weather forecasting
On the eve of the American Meteorological Society's centennial anniversary, Richard Alley and colleagues highlight the advances in our weather and environmental forecasting ability and the many societal benefits they provide. (2019-01-24)

Buzzed flies reveal important step to intoxication
The alcohol in beverages acts much like an anesthetic. It creates a hyper 'buzzed' feeling first, and then sedation. But how? It turns out there is an important intermediate step that wasn't previously known. (2018-12-26)

UK scientists opening up access to science through DIY equipment
Scientists at the University of Sussex have developed a piece of hardware to demonstrate how our brains function, as part of a growing range of equipment which uses DIY and 3D printable models to open up access to science education. (2018-11-08)

Measurement-device-independent quantum communication without encryption
Quantum secure direct communication transmits secret information directly without encryption. Recently, a research team led by Prof. Gui-Lu Long from Tsinghua University proposed a measurement- device- independent quantum secure direct communication protocol using Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen pairs. This protocol eliminates all loopholes related to measurement devices, which solves a key obstacle in practical quantum secure direct communication. The protocol has also an extended communication distance, and a high communication capacity. (2018-10-10)

Lunar craters named in honor of Apollo 8
The Working Group for Planetary System Nomenclature of the International Astronomical Union has today officially approved the naming of two craters on the Moon to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 8 mission. The names are Anders's Earthrise and 8 Homeward. (2018-10-05)

Why we're susceptible to fake news, how to defend against it
Thought processes and belief systems that people develop early in life to help protect against the anxiety and stress of an uncertain world may help explain why some individuals fall victim to what has come to be known as fake news, but psychologists can offer some strategies to defend against it, according to a series of presentations at the annual convention of the American Psychological Association. (2018-08-10)

Slacking on your savings? Cognitive bias could be to blame
A new study by Cornell neuroscientists suggests that, to some degree, we can blame limited savings on our brains in addition to our bills. According to the human development professors Adam Anderson and Eve De Rosa, humans have a cognitive bias toward earning, which makes us unconsciously spend more brain power on earning than on saving. The cognitive bias is so powerful that it can even warp our sense of time. (2018-07-23)

This monkey can plan out their foraging routes just like a human
Vervet monkeys can plan their foraging routes just like humans. (2018-06-04)

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