Current Eye Movements News and Events

Current Eye Movements News and Events, Eye Movements News Articles.
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The way a fish swims reveals a lot about its personality, say scientists
Personality has been described in all sorts of animal species, from ants to apes. Some individuals are shy and sedentary, while others are bold and active. Now a new study published in Ecology and Evolution has revealed that the way a fish swims tells us a lot about its personality. (2021-02-23)

Positive vibes only: Forego negative texts or risk being labelled a downer
A new study from researchers at the University of Ottawa's School of Psychology has found that using negative emojis in text messages produces a negative perception of the sender regardless of their true intent. (2021-02-22)

New therapeutic approach may help treat age-related macular degeneration effectively
Runt-related transcription factor 1 (RUNX1) has been linked to retinal neovascularization and the development of abnormal blood vessels, which result in vision loss in diabetic retinopathy. Now, scientists have found that RUNX1 inhibition presents a new therapeutic approach in the treatment of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), which is the leading cause of blindness in the elderly worldwide. Their results are reported in The American Journal of Pathology, published by Elsevier. (2021-02-22)

COVID-19 linked to potentially dangerous eye abnormalities
Researchers using MRI have found significant abnormalities in the eyes of some people with severe COVID-19, according to a new study. The study results support the need for eye screening in these patients to provide appropriate treatment and management of potentially severe ophthalmological manifestations of COVID-19. (2021-02-16)

Cloudy eyes caused by protein imbalance
Cataracts are the most common eye ailment in humans. However, the exact processes leading to this condition are not fully understood. A team of researchers headed by the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has now discovered that the composition of the protein solution plays a decisive role. Their conclusions are contrary to prevailing opinion in the field. (2021-02-16)

It takes two to tango: When cells interact
When normal, motile cells come into contact, they typically change direction to avoid collision. But cancer cells behave quite differently. A new statistical analysis sheds light on the basis for this difference. (2021-02-16)

Cold sores: Discovery reveals how stress, illness and even sunburn trigger flareups
The finding could lead to new ways to prevent cold sores and herpes-related eye disease from reoccurring, the researchers report. (2021-02-11)

Gulls, sentinels of bacteria in the environment
Gulls are one of the main wild birds that act as reservoirs of Campylobacter and Salmonella, two most relevant intestinal antibiotic-resistant bacteria causing gastroenteritis in humans. Therefore, according to an article published in the journal Science of the Total Environment seagulls could act as sentinels of the antibiotic pressure in the environment. (2021-02-10)

Tiny crustacean redefines ultra-fast movement
Just the size of a sunflower seed, the amphipod Dulichiella cf. appendiculata wields a giant claw that snaps shut 10,000 times faster than the blink of a human eye. The claw makes up 30% of an adult's body mass and closes with an audible snap, creating water jets and sometimes producing small bubbles due to rapid changes in water pressure, a phenomenon known as cavitation. (With Video and Gifs) (2021-02-08)

Deepfake detectors can be defeated, computer scientists show for the first time
Systems designed to detect deepfakes --videos that manipulate real-life footage via artificial intelligence--can be deceived, computer scientists showed for the first time at the WACV 2021 conference which took place online Jan. 5 to 9, 2021. Researchers showed detectors can be defeated by inserting inputs called adversarial examples into every video frame. The adversarial examples are slightly manipulated inputs which cause artificial intelligence systems such as machine learning models to make a mistake. (2021-02-08)

New research sheds light on vision loss in Batten disease
Progressive vision loss, and eventually blindness, are the hallmarks of juvenile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (JNCL) or CLN3-Batten disease. New research shows how the mutation associated with the disease could potentially lead to degeneration of light sensing photoreceptor cells in the retina, and subsequent vision loss. (2021-02-05)

Synthesized very-long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids improved retinal function in mice
A University of Utah ophthalmologist is investigating how lipids known as VLC-PUFAs could be used to prevent eye disease thanks to a new way to synthesize them for research. (2021-02-04)

Brain-related visual problems may affect one in 30 primary school children
A brain-related visual impairment, which until recently was thought to be rare, may affect one in every 30 children according to new research investigating the prevalence of Cerebral Visual Impairment [CVI]. The University of Bristol-led findings published today [3 February] in Developmental Medicine and Child Neurology, aim to raise awareness of CVI among parents and teachers to help them identify signs of the condition earlier. (2021-02-03)

Blink! The link between aerobic fitness and cognition
Researchers from the University of Tsukuba have found evidence that spontaneous eye blink activity, which reflects activity in the dopaminergic system, explains the connection between fitness and cognitive function. This is the first study to indicate that dopamine has an essential role in linking aerobic fitness and cognition. These findings open the door to new research regarding the mechanisms by which exercise improves brain function, and may lead to novel fitness strategies for enhancing cognition. (2021-02-03)

Research findings can help to increase population size of endangered species
The findings of a new study examining the behaviours of alligator and caiman hatchlings have enhanced our understanding of how we can conserve, and increase, the population of endangered crocodilian species. (2021-02-03)

How modern robots are developed
Robots are interesting to neuroscience and neuroscience is interesting to robots - this is what the article 'Neuroengineering challenges of fusing robotics and neuroscience' was about in the journal Science Robotics. Such collaborative development contributes to progress in both fields, bringing us closer to developing more advanced android robots and a deeper understanding of the structure of the human brain. And, to some extent, to combining biological organisms with machines, to create cybernetic organisms (cyborgs). (2021-02-03)

Scientists propose new way to detect emotions using wireless signals
A novel artificial intelligence (AI) approach based on wireless signals could help to reveal our inner emotions, according to new research from Queen Mary University of London. (2021-02-03)

Study reveals neurons responsible for rapidly stopping behaviors, actions
For the first time in humans, investigators at Cedars-Sinai have identified the neurons responsible for canceling planned behaviors or actions--a highly adaptive skill that when lost, can lead to unwanted movements. (2021-02-03)

The benefits of reading outdoors
Investigators demonstrate that image luminance has opposite effects on the contrast sensitivity of cortical pathways signaling lights than darks. It impairs luminance discrimination for the brightest stimuli of the scene while improving it for the darkest stimuli, a mechanism that is needed to efficiently sample natural scenes. (2021-02-02)

Generation of conjunctivae in a dish
Researchers from Osaka University generated functional conjunctival tissue in a dish. By identifying the protein epidermal growth factor and keratinocyte growth factor for the development and maturation of conjunctival cells, respectively, they showed functional, mucin-producing conjunctival tissues can be formed from human induced pluripotent stem cells. This study could help with identifying novel drugs for dry eye syndrome and could further open new avenues for regenerative therapies. (2021-02-02)

Unraveling the mystery of Gao, a protein implicated in movement disorders
Scientists at Scripps Research have clarified the workings of a mysterious protein called Gao, which is one of the most abundant proteins in the brain and, when mutated, causes severe movement disorders. (2021-02-02)

Discovery could lead to self-propelled robots
Army-funded researchers discovered how to make materials capable of self-propulsion, allowing materials to move without motors or hands. Researchers at the University of Massachusetts Amherst discovered how to make materials that snap and reset themselves, only relying upon energy flow from their environment. This research, published in Nature Materials and funded by the U.S. Army, could enable future military robots to move from their own energy. (2021-02-01)

Wearable sensor monitors health, administers drugs using saliva and tears
A new kind of wearable health device would deliver real-time medical data to those with eye or mouth diseases, according to Huanyu 'Larry' Cheng, Dorothy Quiggle Career Development Professor in the Penn State Department of Engineering Science and Mechanics (ESM). (2021-02-01)

UMass Amherst researchers discover materials capable of self-propulsion
Researchers at the University of Massachusetts Amherst have discovered how to make materials that snap and reset themselves, only relying upon energy flow from their environment. The discovery may prove useful for various industries that want to source movement sustainably, from toys to robotics, and is expected to further inform our understanding of how the natural world fuels some types of movement. (2021-02-01)

Marine organisms use previously undiscovered receptors to detect, respond to light
Single-celled organisms in the open ocean use a diverse array of newly discovered genetic tools to detect light, even in tiny amounts, and respond. (2021-02-01)

Threads that sense how and when you move? New technology makes it possible
Engineers have developed a thread-based sensor capable of monitoring the direction, angle of rotation and degree of displacement of the head. The design is a proof of principle that could be extended to measuring movements of other limbs by sensors attached like tatoos to the skin. (2021-01-29)

CCNY researchers demonstrate how to measure student attention during remote learning
The Covid-19 pandemic has made home offices, virtual meetings and remote learning the norm, and it is likely here to stay. But are people paying attention in online meetings? Are students paying attention in virtual classrooms? Researchers Jens Madsen and Lucas C. Parra from City College of New York, demonstrate how eye tracking can be used to measure the level of attention online using standard web cameras, without the need to transfer any data from peoples computers, thus preserving privacy. (2021-01-29)

Scientists spotted RPS-12 protein as a potential target for anti-cancer therapy
Using the developing eye of the fruit fly as a test platform, researchers found that RPS-12 protein overproduction appears to trigger triple-negative breast cancer and possibly some other malignancies. The protein indirectly switches on an important inracellular signaling pathway active while the embryo develops and shut down in healthy cells of adults. Far Eastern Federal University (FEFU), the University of Geneva, and the Institute of Protein Research (Russia) scientists addressed the problem in Scientific Reports. (2021-01-29)

Scientists identify locations of early prion protein deposition in retina
The earliest eye damage from prion disease takes place in the cone photoreceptor cells, specifically in the cilia and the ribbon synapses, according to a new study of prion protein accumulation in the eye by National Institutes of Health scientists. Prion diseases originate when normally harmless prion protein molecules become abnormal and gather in clusters and filaments in the human body and brain. (2021-01-29)

Eyes reveal life history of fish
If you look deep into the eyes of a fish, it will tell you its life story. Scientists from the University of California, Davis, demonstrate that they can use stable isotopic analysis of the eye lenses of freshwater fish -- including threatened and endangered salmon -- to reveal a fish's life history and what it ate along the way. (2021-01-28)

Listening to the call of the wild: Tracking deer movements using sound
Researchers from The University of Tokyo built a prototype system for monitoring deer populations in the wild using sound recording devices in a grid formation. As the sound recording devices are powered by solar panels and synchronize their internal clocks with GPS satellites, they are suitable for unmanned monitoring. Two trials of the system indicated that it is more accurate and convenient than previous methods of monitoring deer and other ungulates. (2021-01-28)

Link between dual sensory loss and depression
People with combined vision and hearing loss are nearly four times more likely to experience depression and more than three times more likely to suffer chronic anxiety, according to a new study published in the journal Frontiers in Psychology and led by Anglia Ruskin University (ARU). (2021-01-28)

Air pollution linked to higher risk of sight loss from AMD
Air pollution is linked to a heightened risk of progressive and irreversible sight loss, known as age related macular degeneration (AMD), reveals a large long term study led by UCL researchers, published in the British Journal of Ophthalmology. (2021-01-25)

Scientists improved eye tracking technology in VR systems
The tracking of eye movement is one of the key elements of virtual and amplified reality technologies (VR/AR). A team from MSU together with a professor from RUDN University developed a mathematical model that helps accurately predict the next gaze fixation point and reduces the inaccuracy caused by blinking. The model would make VR/AR systems more realistic and sensitive to user actions. (2021-01-22)

Hand sanitizer-induced ocular injury
The cases of two children with eye injuries after unintentional contact between alcohol-based hand rubs and the eye are described in this observation. (2021-01-21)

How the brain learns that earmuffs are not valuable at the beach
A collaboration between the University of Tsukuba and the NEI in the US has discovered that fast-spiking neurons in the basal ganglia allow monkeys to associate different values with the same objects based on the surrounding environment. Blocking input from these cells inhibited learning of new scene-based values, but did not erase already learned associations. This could help understand clinical conditions such as Tourette syndrome, which is characterized by reduced input from these cells. (2021-01-21)

Bonobos, chimpanzees, and oxytocin
Kyoto University researchers analyze the effects of the hormone oxytocin in our closest primate cousins, bonobos and chimpanzees by tracking their eye movement -- a important indicator of social interaction. Similar to other mammals, oxytocin increases eye contact in bonobos. However, the opposite effect is observed in chimpanzees. Therefore, oxytocin could play a modulating role in the social evolution of the two species. (2021-01-20)

"Smiling eyes" may not signify true happiness after all
A smile that lifts the cheeks and crinkles the eyes is thought by many to be truly genuine. But new research at Carnegie Mellon University casts doubt on whether this joyful facial expression necessarily tells others how a person really feels inside. (2021-01-20)

Increased blood flow during sleep tied to critical brain function
Our brains experience significant changes in blood flow and neural activity during sleep, according to Penn State researchers. Such changes may help to clean out metabolic brain waste that builds up during the day. (2021-01-18)

Broadening horizons for people with quadriplegia
An assistive technology uses magnetic skin to support freedom of movement for people with quadriplegia. (2021-01-17)

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