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Current Eye News and Events, Eye News Articles.
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Development of the first biohybrid artificial retina built with silk fibroin and retinal cells.
An international research led by the Complutense University of Madrid has taken a further step to solve Age-related Macular Degeneration (AMD)-derived blidness problem with the development of the first biohybrid artificial retina built with silk fibroin and retinal cells. (2020-12-11)

COVID-19 found in the cornea: Are transplants a transmission risk?
A multi-institutional study finds that COVID-19 can be found in post-mortem corneal tissue, highlighting the importance of the donor screening process. (2020-12-10)

How does eye position affect 'cocktail party' listening?
Several acoustic studies have shown that the position of your eyes determines where your visual spatial attention is directed, which automatically influences your auditory spatial attention. Researchers are currently exploring its impact on speech intelligibility. During the 179th ASA Meeting, Virginia Best will describe her work to determine whether there is a measurable effect of eye position within cocktail party listening situations. (2020-12-09)

Single-eye gene therapy improves vision in both eyes of patients with inherited eye disorder
A gene therapy for an inherited eye disorder can ameliorate vision loss in both eyes despite only being injected into one, according to a phase 3 clinical trial involving 37 patients. (2020-12-09)

Research reveals how COVID-19 affects the eyes
Sore eyes are the most significant vision-based indicator of COVID-19, according to new research published in the journal BMJ Open Ophthalmology. (2020-12-08)

A study predicts smooth interaction between humans and robots
According to a new study by Tampere University in Finland, making eye contact with a robot may have the same effect on people as eye contact with another person. The results predict that interaction between humans and humanoid robots will be surprisingly smooth. (2020-12-07)

Researchers say we're watching the world go blind
Three University of Michigan researchers say eye care accessibility around the globe isn't keeping up with an aging population, posing challenges for eye care professionals over the next 30 years. (2020-12-07)

Researchers use genomics to identify diabetic retinopathy factors
In the paper, ''Integration of genomics and transcriptomics predicts diabetic retinopathy susceptibility genes,'' published in eLife, researchers identified genes that respond differently in response to high glucose in individuals with and without diabetic retinopathy. (2020-12-07)

Hydrogel could open new path for glaucoma treatment without drugs or surgery
Researchers have developed a potential new treatment for the eye disease glaucoma that could replace daily eye drops and surgery with a twice-a-year injection to control the buildup of pressure in the eye. The researchers envision the injection being done as an office procedure that could be part of regular patient visits. (2020-12-07)

Huntsman Cancer Institute researchers identify promising drug combination for melanoma
Researchers at Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah have identified a potential drug combination to treat uveal melanoma, a type of eye cancer. Lead author Amanda Truong, trainee in the McMahon Lab at HCI and student at the U of U, explains uveal melanoma patients frequently have changes in genes called GNAQ and GNA11, which are key targets for these drugs. This study was published in the journal Clinical Cancer Research. (2020-12-03)

Restoring a rudimentary form of vision in the blind
Restoration of vision in blind people through a brain implant is on the verge of becoming reality. Recent discoveries at the Netherlands Institute for Neuroscience (NIN) show that newly developed high-resolution implants in the visual cortex make it possible to recognize artificially induced shapes and percepts. The findings were published in Science on 3 December. (2020-12-03)

Human Brain Project-supported innovation published in Science
Human Brain Project research has helped lay the foundation for a brain implant that could one day give blind people their sight back. Recent discoveries at the Netherlands Institute for Neuroscience (NIN) show that in monkeys, newly developed high-resolution implants in the visual cortex make it possible to recognize artificially induced images. The findings were published in Science on 3 December. For further development towards application in humans, the high-resolution 3D digital brain atlases of HBP's EBRAINS Research Infrastructure will become instrumental. (2020-12-03)

Reconstruction of eye tissue gives new insight into outer retina
Researchers used a newly developed imaging technique called serial block face scanning electron microscopy, to produce a digital reconstruction of eye tissues from the outer retina, at very high resolution. This is the first time this technology has been used to fully reconstruct cells from the retina and could provide new insights into the causes of irreversible blinding diseases. (2020-12-02)

Less COVID-19 transmission seen in countries with more intense testing
Lacking vaccines, countries have relied on multiple non-pharmaceutical interventions to control COVID-19 transmission. Despite the urging of the World Health Organization (WHO) in March to ''test, test, and test,'' policy makers disagree on what is adequate testing. (2020-12-02)

Retinal transplant boost opens door to treat eyesight loss
Researchers have identified two cell signals - Ccr5 and Cxcr6 - that are sent out by dying retinal cells to recruit stem cells and repair eye damage. When genetically engineered stem cells with an overabundance of Ccr5 and Cxcr6 cell receptors were transplanted into human and mouse models, they displayed a significantly higher rate of migration to degenerating retinal tissue, rescuing them from death and preserving their function. (2020-12-01)

Targets for avoidable sight loss 'not being met': 30-year study finds
A new global study has found no significant reduction in the number of people with treatable sight loss since 2010. (2020-12-01)

Stem cell-based screen identifies potential new treatments
In a recent study published in Stem Cell Reports, Seba Almedawar, PhD, and colleagues with the Center for Regenerative Therapies TU Dresden, Germany, used induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) derived from the skin of healthy donors and of patients with retinitis pigmentosa to find drugs with the potential to enhance RPE phagocytosis. (2020-11-25)

COVID's collateral damage: Germicidal lamps may damage corneas
In a paper published in the journal of Ocular Immunology and Inflammation, physicians from the Bascom Palmer Eye Institute at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine reported that several patients using germicidal lamps in an attempt to sanitize against the coronavirus, developed painful inflammation of the cornea, a condition called photokeratitis. These consumer-available ultraviolet (UV) emitting devices were being usedin an attempt toeliminate coronavirusfrom homes and offices. (2020-11-24)

Eye exam could lead to early Parkinson's disease diagnosis
A simple eye exam combined with powerful artificial intelligence (AI) machine learning technology could provide early detection of Parkinson's disease, according to research being presented at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA). (2020-11-23)

Unique Schwann cells: the eyes have it
Neuroscience researchers at UConn Health are finding genetic properties of Schwann cells in the cornea that may unlock a better understanding of their role in healing, sensory function, preserving vision, and even nerve regeneration. (2020-11-23)

Diabetic eye disease associated with five-fold risk of severe COVID-19
People with diabetes and eye disease have a five-fold increased risk of requiring intubation when hospitalised with COVID-19. (2020-11-23)

Monitoring glaucoma at home
Glaucoma is a chronic condition that affects cells at the back of the eye. It is the leading cause of irreversible blindness worldwide. People with glaucoma, or at risk of developing glaucoma, require lifelong monitoring, including regular eye tests to track the progression of the disease. A study from City, University of London is the first in the world that suggests glaucoma eye tests can be performed accurately at home by patients themselves. (2020-11-20)

Novel deep learning method enables clinic-ready automated screening for diabetes-related eye disease
Researchers at Helmholtz Zentrum M√ľnchen together with LMU University Eye Hospital Munich and the Technical University of Munich (TUM) created a novel deep learning method that makes automated screenings for eye diseases such as diabetic retinopathy more efficient. (2020-11-12)

Novel population of neurons identified that control binocular eye movements in 3D space
Researchers have discovered a previously undescribed population of neurons called saccade-vergence burst neurons that help control our eyes as they view in three-dimensional space. Models had predicted the existence of such neurons. The neurons are in a region of the mid-brain called the central mesencephalic reticular formation. (2020-11-11)

Technique to regenerate optic nerve offers hope for future glaucoma treatment
Scientists have used gene therapy to regenerate damaged nerve fibres in the eye, in a discovery that could aid the development of new treatments for glaucoma, one of the leading causes of blindness worldwide. (2020-11-05)

New technology allows cameras to capture colors invisible to the human eye
New research from Tel Aviv University will allow cameras to recognize colors that the human eye and even ordinary cameras are unable to perceive. The technology makes it possible to image gases and substances such as hydrogen, carbon and sodium, each of which has a unique color in the infrared spectrum, as well as biological compounds that are found in nature but are 'invisible' to the naked eye or ordinary cameras. (2020-11-05)

Nature-inspired design--Mimicking moth eyes to produce transparent anti-reflective coatings
The eyes of moths have a biological nanostructure that grants them anti-reflective properties. Though researchers have managed to mimic this structure to produce anti-reflective coatings, current techniques are not easily scalable. Now, researchers from Japan have devised a strategy to produce large area moth-eye transparent films that greatly reduce reflectance and improve transmittance. These films could be used to better the visibility of screens and enhance the performance of solar panels. (2020-11-04)

Cornea appears to resist infection from novel coronavirus
Some doctors have worried that the novel coronavirus may be able to infect people by getting into their eyes. Viruses such as herpes simplex can infect the eye's cornea and Zika virus has been found in corneal tissue and tears, but new research from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis suggests the cornea can resist infection from SARS-CoV-2. (2020-11-03)

Invisible fungi revealed by their genetic material
How can new life forms that we cannot see be discovered? Using a novel method based on looking for DNA in soil samples, researchers at Uppsala University have revealed the existence of two hitherto unknown, but very common fungus species. They are thought to perform a key function in the ecosystem, but their exact role remains to be clarified. The study is published in the journal IMA Fungus. (2020-11-03)

From Health Affairs: Financial consequences of firearm fatalities in OECD countries
Firearm-related fatalities are a global public health issue. However, few data exist about the macroeconomic effect of firearm-related fatalities. To gain a better understanding of this issue, Alexander W. Peters from New York-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell and coauthors estimate the macroeconomic consequences of firearm-related fatalities in each of the thirty-six Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) countries. (2020-11-02)

Research provides a new understanding of how a model insect species sees color
Through an effort to characterize the color receptors in the eyes of the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, University of Minnesota researchers discovered the spectrum of light it can see deviates significantly from what was previously recorded. (2020-10-26)

Scientists use gene therapy and a novel light-sensing protein to restore vision in mice
A newly developed light-sensing protein called the MCO1 opsin restores vision in blind mice when attached to retina bipolar cells using gene therapy. The National Eye Institute, part of the National Institutes of Health, provided a Small Business Innovation Research grant to Nanoscope, LLC for development of MCO1. The company is planning a U.S. clinical trial for later this year. (2020-10-21)

Quarter of partially-sighted have unmet needs
Almost a quarter of people with severe sight loss in the UK are going without the treatment they need, according to a new study being presented at the World Congress on Public Health today (2020-10-16)

Bringing people together on climate change
A new study suggests that engaging, high-quality media programming could help Democrats and Republicans see eye to eye when it comes to climate change. (2020-10-14)

Presented a program capable of detecting neurodegeneration biomarkers through magnetic
This tool is able to identify single-person neurodegeneration before the symptom's appearance, which could significate a more effective and personalized medicine. (2020-10-08)

Feline friendly? How to build rap-paw with your cat - new psychology study
A team of psychologists at the Universities of Sussex and Portsmouth have discovered a way for humans to bond with cats. (2020-10-07)

Discovery holds potential for reversing vision loss
Scientists at the Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation have identified a compound that could reverse the vision loss that occurs when blood vessels in the eyes of premature infants and adults grow out of control. (2020-10-05)

New study finds antidepressant drug effective in treating "lazy eye" in adults
In a new study, published in Current Biology, researchers from the University of California, Irvine School of Medicine reveal how subanesthetic ketamine, which is used for pain management and as an antidepressant in humans, is effective in treating adult amblyopia, a brain disorder commonly known as ''lazy eye.'' (2020-09-30)

First 'pathoconnectome' could point toward new treatments for neurodegenerative diseases
Scientists from the John A. Moran Eye Center at the University of Utah have achieved another first in the field of connectomics, which studies the synaptic connections between neurons. The lab has produced the first pathoconnectome, showing how eye disease alters retinal circuitry. (2020-09-29)

Biomarker indicating neurodegeneration identified in the eye
A new study led by Boston Medical Center researchers indicates a well-known biomarker that serves as a marker for earlier diagnosis of neurodegenerative diseases is now detectable in the eye. Neurofilament light chain, a protein previously detected in cerebrospinal fluid and blood that is being explored as a biomarker to detect neurodegeneration, has now been identified in the vitreous humor, or fluid within the eye. (2020-09-21)

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