Current Eyewitness Accounts News and Events

Current Eyewitness Accounts News and Events, Eyewitness Accounts News Articles.
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Breakthrough in organic chemistry: Asymmetric syntheses of useful, unique chiral compounds
''N?C axially chiral compounds'' are important chiral molecules with various applications in medicinal chemistry and chiral technology. However, there is a scarcity of research on ways to synthesize them in an enantioselective (asymmetric) manner, to obtain useful forms of the compounds. Researchers at Shibaura Institute of Technology, Japan, have rectified this, by developing a catalytic enantioselective method to synthesize various N?C axially chiral compounds. A recent article in Accounts of Chemical Research summarizes their achievements. (2021-02-16)

Cells use concentration gradients as a compass
Biophysicists at Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munch have developed a new theory, which accounts for the observation that cells can perceive their own shapes, and use this information to direct the distribution of proteins inside the cell. (2021-02-16)

Counterintuitive approach may improve eyewitness identification
Experts have devised a novel approach to selecting photos for police lineups that helps witnesses identify culprits more reliably (2021-02-15)

How shared partisanship leads to social media connections
MIT scholars have found that Twitter users are three times more likely to follow other Twitter accounts they are aligned with in political terms, showing how much partisan identification itself drives social groupings. (2021-02-11)

Brazil: Air conditioning equipment days of use will double without climate action
Increasing demand for space cooling in Brazil will increase greenhouse gas emissions by 70-190% due to air conditioners, depending on how much we will mitigate climate change. A study carried out with the contribution of CMCC@Ca'Foscari explains the relationship between climate change, space cooling needs, and electricity demand in different regions of the country. (2021-02-10)

How heavy is dark matter? Scientists radically narrow the potential mass range for the first time
Scientists have calculated the mass range for Dark Matter - and it's tighter than the science world thought. (2021-01-27)

Holocaust Remembrance Day: COVID-19 changed how we remember
Educators have successfully leveraged new forms of Holocaust remembrance using social media tools. Included have been a series of memory related hashtags in use on Twitter and Facebook, ''live'' Instagram stories from memorial sites and concentration camps as well as Zoom discussions with Holocaust survivors across the globe. This transition was described by the author as particularly important because prior to Corona, many memorials objected to such means of communication out of fear that it would ''commercialize'' or even distort legitimate Holocaust memory. (2021-01-26)

When it comes to eyewitness accounts of earthquake shaking, representation matters
As scientists increasingly rely on eyewitness accounts of earthquake shaking reported through online systems, they should consider whether those accounts are societally and spatially representative for an event, according to a new paper published in Seismological Research Letters. (2021-01-21)

Study: in social media safety messages, the pictures should match the words
When using social media to nudge people toward safe and healthy behaviors, it's critical to make sure the words match the pictures, according to a new study. After looking at social media posts, parents of young children were better able to recall safety messages such as how to put a baby safely to sleep when the images in the posts aligned with the messages in the text. (2020-12-31)

New research could lead to better eyewitness recall in criminal investigations
A team of researchers, including faculty at Binghamton University, State University of New York, explore ways to potentially improve the recall of eyewitnesses in a new paper in the Journal of Cognitive Psychology. (2020-12-16)

States unfairly burdening incarcerated people with 'pay-to-stay' fees
Pay-to-stay, the practice of charging people to pay for their own jail or prison confinement, is being enforced unfairly by using criminal, civil and administrative law, according to a new Rutgers University-New Brunswick led study. (2020-11-20)

Bronze Age travel routes revealed using pioneering research method
Archaeologists from the University of Sydney have reconstructed the ancient seasonal migration routes of Bronze Age herders in Xinjiang, north-western China. Published in the high-ranking journal PLOS ONE, their research was the result of innovative methodology. To determine snow cover and vegetation cycles, crucial to the survival of Bronze Age people and their flocks, they examined both satellite imagery and archaeological evidence, as well as interviewing modern-day herders. (2020-11-04)

Tradition of petrified birds in the Dome of the Rock
The legend of Solomon and the birds associated with the Dome of the Rock was developed over time. Stories about the two birds demonstrate that Sufi traditions and the figure of Solomon were still very influential in shaping the appearance and conception of the Dome of the Rock. (2020-10-20)

Mental accounting is impacting sustainable behavior
Human beings tend to create separate mental budget compartments where specific acts of consumption and payments are linked. This mechanism can be counter-productive when it comes to energy consumption and can have a negative impact on attempts to reduce carbon emissions. Psychologists from the University of Geneva, have linked theories and research on mental accounting to energy and sustainability behaviour, proposing concrete strategies to improve the impact of climate-control measures. (2020-10-13)

Coordinated efforts on Twitter to interfere in US elections are foreign-based
An analysis of more than 2.2 million tweets has found a coordinated effort to influence the upcoming U.S. presidential election by sowing distrust, exacerbating political divisions and undermining confidence in American democracy. The effort is most likely foreign, according to the study. (2020-10-08)

Influence of bots on spreading vaccine information not as big as you think
The role of bots in spreading vaccine-critical information on Twitter is limited and rarely cross paths with active Twitter users, finds study led by University of Sydney. (2020-10-01)

Earthquake lightning: Mysterious luminescence phenomena
Photoemission induced by rock fracturing can occur as a result of landslides associated with earthquakes. Factors involved in such earthquake lightnings were studied with granite, rhyolite, pyroclastic rock and limestone. (2020-09-28)

Vaccine proponents and opponents are vectors of misinformation online
Researchers from the George Washington University, University of Maryland and Johns Hopkins University assessed content from the most active vaccine-related accounts on Twitter and found that even accounts with pro-vaccination views and higher public health credibility can be vectors of misinformation in the highly uncertain and rapidly changing environment caused by the COVID-19 pandemic. (2020-09-09)

A better model for predicting death by heat in nature?
A mathematical model that better accounts for temperature impacts from duration of exposure is helping scientists improve their grasp of how future climate warming will affect the survival of natural Drosophila populations. (2020-09-03)

Warning witnesses of the possibility of misinformation helps protect their memory accuracy
Warning about the threat of misinformation -- before or after an event -- significantly reduces the negative impact of misinformation on memory, according to research at Tufts University. The findings could have important implications for improving the accuracy of everyday memory and eyewitness testimony. (2020-08-31)

Many medical 'rainy day' accounts aren't getting opened or filled, study finds
One-third of the people who could benefit from a special type of savings account to cushion the blow of their health plan deductible aren't doing so, a new study finds. And even among people who do open a health savings account, half haven't put any money into it in the past year. This means they may be missing a chance to avoid taxes on money they can use to pay for their health insurance deductible and other costs. (2020-08-13)

New research may help identify sex trafficking networks
Characterizing traits of online activity may help to rescue victims of sex trafficking. While scientists have tried to help pinpoint outfits participating in trafficking, few scientific studies have looked of how the digital infrastructure behind the online sex market operates. A paper from Mayank Kejriwal, a research assistant professor at the USC Information Sciences Institute and Yao Gu (currently at Amazon) provides some insights on the specific digital practices of potential sex trafficking networks. (2020-08-10)

Engineers find thinner tissues in replacement heart valves create problematic flutter
Iowa State and University of Texas engineers have developed high-fidelity computational models of replacement heart valves to examine the performance of biological tissues built into the valves. They found that thinner tissues can flap and flutter, which can damage the valves and even the blood that flows by. (2020-07-29)

Owe the IRS? No problem, some Americans say
A new study shows the surprising way that many American taxpayers adjust their standard of living when they owe money to the IRS versus when they receive tax refunds. Researchers found that when households received tax refunds, they immediately started spending that new money. But those same households didn't cut their spending in years when they owed taxes to the IRS. (2020-07-28)

Tracking misinformation campaigns in real-time is possible, study shows
A research team led by Princeton University has developed a technique for tracking online foreign misinformation campaigns in real time, which could help mitigate outside interference in the 2020 American election. (2020-07-22)

"Winter is coming": The influence of seasonality on pathogen emergence
Seasonal fluctuations drive the dynamics of many infectious diseases. For instance, the flu spreads more readily in winter. Two scientists from the University of Nantes and the CNRS in Montpellier have developed a mathematical model to predict the risk of the emergence of an epidemic, depending on the time of the year at which the pathogen is introduced. (2020-07-21)

Keeping innocent people out of jail using the science of perception
People wrongfully accused of a crime often wait years -- if ever -- to be exonerated. Many of these wrongfully accused cases stem from unreliable eyewitness testimony. Now, Salk scientists have identified a new way of presenting a lineup to an eyewitness that could improve the likelihood that the correct suspect is identified and reduce the number of innocent people sentenced to jail. (2020-07-14)

Scientists at USC and other institutions develop new method to improve police lineups
For the first time, scientists have developed a way to measure the reliability of an eyewitness trying to pick a culprit from a police lineup. The findings could help reduce the number of innocent people convicted of crimes. (2020-07-14)

Alaskan volcano linked to mysterious period with extreme climate in ancient Rome
The cold, famine and unrest in ancient Rome and Egypt after the assassination of Julius Caesar in 44 BCE has long been shrouded in mystery. Now, an international team, including researchers from the University of Copenhagen, has found evidence suggesting that the megaeruption of an Alaskan volcano may be to blame. (2020-07-10)

How vaping companies are use Instagram to market to young people
Using artificial intelligence, researchers analysed hundreds of thousands of posts from a 6-month period last year, and found that a large portion of Instagram posts are promoting controversial flavoured e-liquids to young audiences (2020-07-09)

Running in Tarahumara culture
Running in Tarahumara (RarĂ¡muri) Culture. The Tarahumara (RarĂ¡muri) are a Native American people from Chihuahua, Mexico, who have long been famous for running, but there is widespread incredulity about how and why they run such long distances. Tarahumara, like many Native American peoples, consider running, along with other endurance-based activities, to have important social dimensions, such as a spiritually vital form of prayer. (Current Anthropology) (2020-07-06)

BU study: Nearly half of US youth have been stalked/harassed by partners
A new, first-of-its-kind Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) study finds that 48% of 12-18-year-olds who have been in a relationship have been stalked or harassed by a partner, and 42% have stalked or harassed a partner. (2020-06-29)

Oncotarget: The role of EGFR mutations in predicting recurrence in lung adenocarcinoma
Volume 11, Issue 22 of @Oncotarget reported that while lobectomy can improve mortality in this group, about 30 55% of patients will experience disease recurrence. (2020-06-10)

Privacy flaws in security and doorbell cameras discovered by Florida Tech Student
Ring, Nest, SimpliSafe and eight other manufacturers of internet-connected doorbell and security cameras have been alerted to ''systemic design flaws'' discovered by Florida Tech computer science student Blake Janes that allow a shared account that appears to have been removed to actually remain in place with continued access to the video feed. (2020-05-26)

Personal accounts of childhood maltreatment matter more for mental health than records
Personal accounts of childhood maltreatment show a stronger association with psychiatric problems compared to legal proof that maltreatment occurred, according to a new study co-written by a King's College London researcher. (2020-05-18)

Russian trolls on Twitter polarized vaccination during 2016 election cycle
During the 2016 election cycle, politically polarizing tweets by Russian trolls about vaccination included pro- and anti-vaccination messages targeted at people with specific political inclinations through a nine different fake persona types, according to a new study. Now, as the nation deals with the coronavirus pandemic, the researchers raise concerns that such polarization potentially affects crisis communications and creates tensions, mistrust, and a lack of intention to comply with government health directives. (2020-03-31)

Fake Russian Twitter accounts politicized discourse about vaccines
Activity from phony Twitter accounts established by the Russian Internet Research Agency (IRA) between 2015 and 2017 may have contributed to politicizing Americans' position on the nature and efficacy of vaccines, a health care topic which has not historically fallen along party lines, according to new research published in the American Journal of Public Health. (2020-03-31)

APS tip sheet: Capturing election interference
New model analyzes characteristics of the 2016 election and surrounding social media activity. (2020-02-18)

The verdict is in: Courtrooms seldom overrule bad science
A new, multiyear study published in Psychological Science in the Public Interest (PSPI), a journal of the Association for Psychological Science (APS), finds that only 40% of the psychological assessment tools used in courts have been favorably rated by experts. Even so, lawyers rarely challenge their conclusions, and when they do, only one third of those challenges are successful. (2020-02-15)

Model shows how to make on-farm sustainable energy projects profitable
Researchers have developed a model that could boost investment in farm-based sustainable energy projects by allowing investors to more accurately predict whether a project will turn a profit. The model improves on earlier efforts by using advanced computational techniques to address uncertainty. (2020-02-10)

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