Current Fairness News and Events

Current Fairness News and Events, Fairness News Articles.
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Hotels that promote women perceived as fairer, less discriminatory
New research led by the University of Houston Conrad N. Hilton College of Hotel and Restaurant Management suggests hotel companies that promote a woman over an equally qualified man are perceived as fairer and less discriminatory, creating a stronger organizational culture and higher financial performance. (2021-01-05)

Bosses need appreciation, too
'Tis the season to be grateful, even for your boss, according to a recent A new study suggests that when supervisors feel appreciated, it gives them a boost of energy and optimism. In the end, that's good for employees and the organization's bottom line. (2020-12-10)

Conservatives and liberals motivated by different psychological factors, new study shows
Liberalism and conservatism are associated with qualitatively different psychological concerns, notably those linked to morality, shows a new study that explores how political ideology and moral values are connected to motivated social cognition. (2020-11-11)

Is spirituality a component of wisdom?
In a recent study, researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine found a seventh component of wisdom: spirituality. (2020-10-22)

Reactions to perceived broken promises lead to workplace stress for police officers
Negative feelings resulting from perceived broken promises from employers within UK police forces are a major cause of workplace stress, according to new research at the University of Birmingham. (2020-10-05)

Tool helps clear biases from computer vision
Researchers at Princeton University have developed a tool that flags potential biases in sets of images used to train artificial intelligence (AI) systems. The work is part of a larger effort to remedy and prevent the biases that have crept into AI systems that influence everything from credit services to courtroom sentencing programs. (2020-10-01)

Study shows keeping gratitude journal reduces gossip, incivility in workplace
Gratitude interventions in the workplace can help employee well-being and managers can use these efforts to foster more respectful behavior in their teams. (2020-09-22)

The unintended consequence of becoming empathetic
Many people want to become more empathetic. But, these changes in personality may also lead to changes in political ideologies. (2020-09-16)

Privatized prisons lead to more inmates, longer sentences, study finds
WSU study finds that when states turn to private prisons, the number of criminals incarcerated rises and the length of sentences increases. Private prisons lead to an average increase of 178 new prisoners per million population per year. At an average cost of $60 per day per prisoner, that costs states between $1.9 to $10.6 million per year, if all those additional prisoners are in private prisons. (2020-09-14)

Energy-efficient design for mmWave-enabled NOMA-UAV networks
Combining NOMA with mmWave technology in UAV communication networks is promising to enhance the network performance. Spectrum-efficient mmWave transmission schemes have been extensively investigated in existing literatures. However, energy efficiency is of paramount importance for UAVs due to their limited energy storage. Recently, researchers from Dalian University of Technology have developed an energy-efficient design for mmWave-enabled NOMA-UAV networks by jointly optimizing the UAV placement, hybrid precoding and power allocation. (2020-08-24)

New tool improves fairness of online search rankings
In a new paper, Cornell University researchers introduce a tool they've developed to improve the fairness of online rankings without sacrificing their usefulness or relevance. (2020-08-18)

Restaurant customers frown on automatic gratuities, particularly after good service
Automatic gratuities leave restaurant patrons with a bad taste, even when the meal and the service were excellent, new research from Washington State University indicates. (2020-08-10)

Language may undermine women in science and tech
Researchers examined gender stereotypes baked into 25 languages to explore why fewer women enter science, technology, engineering and mathematics fields. (2020-08-03)

Ethical recommendations for triage of COVID-19 patients
An international expert group led by Mathias Wirth, Professor of Systematic Theology and Ethics at the University of Bern, has developed recommendations for avoiding triage of COVID-19 patients in extreme situations. The recommendations should support medical personnel in difficult decisions during a second wave of the infection and ensure better patient care. (2020-07-16)

Simulating cooperation in local communities
In new research published in EPJ B, a new simulation-based approach is introduced which could help to reduce the proportion of people who misuse welfare payoffs, through a cost-effective system which rewards individuals who use them responsibly. (2020-06-18)

How communication about environmental issues can bridge the political divide
A relatively new theory that identifies universal concerns underlying human judgment could be key to helping people with opposing views on an issue coax each other to a different way of thinking, new research suggests. (2020-03-06)

Report builds framework for 'digital political ethics' in 2020
With the 2020 elections looming and amid continuing concerns over social media's role in US politics, four top universities have published a comprehensive new report recommending how candidates, tech platforms and regulators can ensure that digital political campaigns promote and protect fair elections. (2020-01-08)

Highlighting women's achievements makes them want to be the boss, research shows
Highlighting female achievements in the workplace makes capable women significantly more likely to want to be the boss, a study shows. (2020-01-08)

People view rationality and reasonableness as distinct principles of judgment
When it comes to making sound judgements, most people understand and distinguish that being rational is self-serving and being reasonable is fair and balanced, finds new research from the University of Waterloo. The study is the first systematic attempt to explore what people consider to be sound judgment and whether they understand rationality and reasonableness along the lines advocated by experts in economics, law, and other social scientists. (2020-01-08)

How does your body respond to feelings of moral outrage? It depends on your politics
USC study finds that liberals and conservatives feel moral violations in different areas of their bodies, interpret them as distinct complex feelings and make different moral and political judgments. (2020-01-08)

Ratings system may penalize hospitals serving vulnerable communities
Analysis of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) Hospital Compare rating system shows that hospitals serving vulnerable communities may be judged on social factors outside of their control. (2020-01-07)

Can artificial intelligence help prevent suicides?
Researchers at the USC have been enlisting the help of artificial intelligence to help mitigate the risk of suicide. Phebe Vayanos, an associate director at USC's Center for Artificial Intelligence in Society (CAIS), and her team have been working over the last couple of years to design an algorithm capable of identifying who in a given real-life social group would be the best persons to be trained as 'gatekeepers' capable of identifying warning signs of suicide and how to respond. (2019-12-12)

Algorithm for preventing 'undesirable behavior' works in gender fairness and health tests
A new framework for designing machine learning algorithms helps to prevent intelligent machines from exhibiting undesirable behavior, researchers report. (2019-11-21)

New algorithms train AI to avoid specific bad behaviors
Robots, self-driving cars and other intelligent machines could become better-behaved if machine-learning designers adopt a new framework for building AI with safeguards against specific undesirable outcomes. The researchers dub their approach 'Seldonian algorithms' -- a reference to the Hari Seldon character of sci-fi author Isaac Asimov, who coined the laws of robotics starting with: 'A robot may not injure a human being or, through inaction, allow a human being to come to harm.' (2019-11-21)

New machine learning algorithms offer safety and fairness guarantees
Writing in Science, Thomas and his colleagues Yuriy Brun, Andrew Barto and graduate student Stephen Giguere at UMass Amherst, Bruno Castro da Silva at the Federal University of Rio Grande del Sol, Brazil, and Emma Brunskill at Stanford University this week introduce a new framework for designing machine learning algorithms that make it easier for users of the algorithm to specify safety and fairness constraints. (2019-11-21)

Are hiring algorithms fair? They're too opaque to tell, study finds
New research from a team of Computing and Information Science scholars at Cornell University raises questions about hiring algorithms and the tech companies who develop and use them: How unbiased is the automated screening process? How are the algorithms built? And by whom, toward what end, and with what data? (2019-11-20)

Political affiliation may help drive and shape a person's morals
While it may seem intuitive that a person's beliefs or moral compass may steer them toward one political party over another, a new Penn State study suggests it may be the other way around. (2019-10-24)

Developmental psychology -- One good turn deserves another
Five-year-olds enforce reciprocal behavior in social interactions. A study by Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich psychologists shows that children come to recognize reciprocity as a norm between the ages of 3 and 5. (2019-09-18)

ACC issues principles for overcoming compensation, opportunity inequity
The American College of Cardiology today published its first health policy statement on cardiologist compensation and opportunity equity, recognizing that both are critical to the health and future of the cardiovascular workforce and achieving ACC's mission to transform cardiovascular care and improve heart health. (2019-09-16)

People believe achieving environmental sustainability could hinder quality of life
Social wellbeing and community, not wider economy, uppermost in people's concerns over sustainability policies. (2019-09-02)

What if we paid countries to protect biodiversity?
Researchers from Sweden, Germany, Brazil and the USA have developed a financial mechanism to support the protection of the world's natural heritage. In a recent study, they developed three different design options for an intergovernmental biodiversity financing mechanism. Asking what would happen if money was given to countries for providing protected areas, they simulated where the money would flow, what type of incentives this would create - and how these incentives would align with international conservation goals. (2019-08-30)

New scientific model can predict moral and political development
A study from a Swedish team of researchers recently published in the social science journal Nature Human Behaviour answers several critical questions on how public opinion changes on moral issues. They have created a scientific model that can predict public opinion changes on moral issues. (2019-08-26)

Political campaigns may influence acceptance of violence against women
Nicole Johnson, assistant professor of counseling psychology at Lehigh University, set out to examine the influence, both positive and negative, of presidential campaigns, voting behavior, and candidate selection, on social views of rape culture. (2019-08-15)

Right or left, Americans value hard work to achieve success
Conservatives and liberals may agree on at least one thing: the importance of working hard in order to succeed. (2019-08-07)

Liberals and conservatives have different views on equity, but share 'protestant work ethic'
American liberals and conservatives have different views on equity, according to a new study focusing on Moral Foundations Theory, but are not that different from each other when it comes to the 'Protestant work ethic.' (2019-08-07)

NZ researchers call for gender binary in elite sports to be abandoned
Existing gender categories in sport should perhaps be abandoned in favor of a more 'nuanced' approach in the new transgender era, University of Otago researchers say. (2019-07-22)

Win or lose: Rigged card game sheds light on inequality, fairness
Researchers at Cornell University are using a rigged card game to shed light on perceptions of inequality. (2019-07-17)

Fairtrade benefits rural workers in Africa, but not the poorest of the poor
A new study from the University of Göttingen and international partners has analysed the effects of Fairtrade certification on poor rural workers in Africa. The results show that Fairtrade improves the situation of employees in agricultural cooperatives, but not of workers in the smallholder farm sector, who are often particularly disadvantaged. The study was published in ''Nature Sustainability''. (2019-07-01)

SUTD researchers enhance security in proof of stake blockchain protocols
Proof of Stake Blockchain protocols rely on voting mechanisms to reach consensus on the data, but they can be vulnerable to faults when validators accidentally or maliciously withhold their votes. SUTD researchers studied weighted voting and designed an algorithm to enhance their security. (2019-06-19)

Witnessing uncivil behavior
When people witness poor customer service, a manager's intervention can help reduce hostility toward the company or brand, according to WSU research. (2019-06-18)

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