Current Falling News and Events

Current Falling News and Events, Falling News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Viewed
Page 1 of 18 | 701 Results
Recognizing liars from the sound of their voice?
French scientists have conducted a series of experiments to understand how we decide, based on the voice, whether a speaker is honest and confident, or on the contrary dishonest and uncertain. (2021-02-08)

How the brain paralyzes you while you sleep
Researchers from the University of Tsukuba have discovered a group of neurons in the mouse brainstem that control muscle tone. Inhibiting these neuronal cells caused mice to move during REM sleep, reminiscent of REM sleep behavior disorders. These neurons were also responsible for episodes of cataplexy in a mouse model of narcolepsy; inhibiting them reduced the number of cataplexic bouts. These circuits could thus be a new target for treating these sleep disorders. (2021-01-14)

Latina mothers, often essential workers, report COVID-19 took toll
More than half of Latina mothers surveyed in Yolo and Sacramento counties reported making economic cutbacks in response to the pandemic shutdown last spring -- saying they bought less food and missed rent payments. Hardships were not reduced by stimulus checks. (2021-01-08)

How effective are educational support programs for children with cancer?
As children undergo treatment for cancer, they may miss school and risk falling behind in their education. An analysis published in Pyscho-Oncology has examined the educational support programs provided to children with cancer. (2021-01-06)

Climate crisis is causing lakes to shrink
Climate change is impacting not only the oceans, but also large inland lakes. As the world's largest lake, the Caspian Sea is a perfect example of how a body of water can and will change. In an article in the Nature journal Communications Earth & Environment, Dr. Matthias Prange of MARUM - Center for Marine Environmental Sciences at the University of Bremen, and his colleagues discuss the possible ecological, political and economic consequences, as well as viable solutions. (2020-12-23)

Landslide along Alaskan fjord could trigger tsunami
Scientists noted that the slope on Barry Arm fjord on Prince William Sound in southeastern Alaska slid some 120 meters from 2010 to 2017, a slow-moving landslide caused by glacial melt that could trigger a devastating tsunami. These are some of the first measurements to quantify how the slope is falling there; the study also models a potential tsunami. (2020-11-12)

Psychological status rather than cognitive status is associated with incorrect perception of risk of falling in patients with moderate stage dementia
Dementia is associated with an impaired self-perception with potentially harmful consequences for health status and clinical risk classification in this patient group with an extraordinary high risk of falling. (2020-11-10)

Weak equivalence principle violated in gravitational waves
New research published in EPJ C proves theoretically that the Weak Equivalence Principle can be violated by quantum particles in gravitational waves - the ripples in spacetime caused by colossal events such as merging black holes. (2020-10-28)

NASA analyzes rainfall around Typhoon Chan-hom's ragged eye
A NASA satellite rainfall product that incorporates data from satellites and observations found heavy rainfall occurring throughout Typhoon Chan-hom and the heaviest rainfall in the eyewall. Chan-hom is expected to bring rainfall to Japan on its track through the Northwestern Pacific Ocean. (2020-10-07)

How the brain's inner clock measures seconds
UCLA researchers have pinpointed a second hand to the brain's internal clock. By revealing how and where the brain counts and represents seconds, the UCLA discovery will expand scientists' understanding of normal and abnormal brain function. (2020-09-17)

Older people with early, asymptomatic Alzheimer's at risk of falls
Older people without cognitive problems who experience a fall may have undetected neurodegeneration in their brains that puts them at high risk of developing Alzheimer's dementia, according to a study from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. (2020-09-14)

Atheists are more likely to sleep better than Catholics and Baptists
A new study of sleep, religious affiliation, and perceptions of heaven found that atheists and agnostics are significantly more likely to be better sleepers than Catholics and Baptists. (2020-08-28)

Smoking strongly linked to women's lower take up of cancer screening services
Smoking is strongly linked to lower use of cancer screening services by women, and more advanced disease once cancer is diagnosed, reveals research published in the online journal BMJ Open. (2020-08-13)

Simple test helps to predict and prevent falls
Scientists have developed a simple clinical test that can assess the lower limb strength of patients to predict their risk of falls. The ''enhanced paper grip test'' validated by researchers from the Centre for Biomechanics and Rehabilitation Technologies (CBRT) at Staffordshire University involves pulling a small card from underneath the participant's foot while asking them to grip with their big toe (Hallux). (2020-07-20)

Oral herpes rates are falling in children
Fewer people are being exposed to herpes simplex type 1 - also known as oral herpes - in their childhood and the prevalence amongst the population in Europe is falling by 1% per year, suggests research published in the journal BMJ Global Health. (2020-07-16)

Monitoring groundwater changes more precisely
A new method could help to track groundwater changes better than before. Researchers from Potsdam and the USA have compared gravity field data from the GRACE and GRACE-Follow On satellite missions with other measuring methods. They investigated the seasonal water storage in almost 250 river basins in Asia, whose water regime is dominated by monsoon. The results allow the large-scale GRACE data to be scaled down to smaller regions. The researchers report on this in the journal Earth and Planetary Science Letters. (2020-07-15)

STRIDE study tests ways to prevent injuries from falls
Every year about one in three adults age 65 and older takes a fall, and 20 to 30% of those who fall suffer significant injuries such as head trauma or a broken hip. A new study shows how difficult it is to prevent these injuries, even with help from primary care providers. (2020-07-12)

SFU researchers working to improve quality of life for seniors in long-term care
Simon Fraser University researchers are hoping their latest study on seniors will help to address one of their biggest physical challenges -- injury from falls. (2020-06-17)

A* model
Like most galaxies, the Milky Way hosts a supermassive black hole at its center. Called Sagittarius A*, the object has captured astronomers' curiosity for decades. And now there is an effort to image it directly. (2020-06-12)

NASA finds post-tropical depression Cristobal soaking the Great Lakes
NASA's GPM satellite gathered data on what is now Post-Tropical Cyclone Cristobal and revealed some areas of heavy rain were occurring. Cristobal was bringing rainfall and gusty winds to the Great Lakes Region and still generating warnings. (2020-06-10)

Armor on butterfly wings protects against heavy rain
An analysis of high-speed raindrops hitting biological surfaces such as feathers, plant leaves and insect wings reveals how these highly water-repelling veneers reduce the water's impact. (2020-06-09)

NASA calculates soaking rainfall in Tropical Depression Cristobal
When Tropical Storm Cristobal made landfall in southern Louisiana yesterday, May 7, it dropped a lot of rain, and continues to as it weakens and moves inland. NASA's GPM satellite provided a look at the rainfall rates in the now depression. (2020-06-08)

Kirigami grips could help seniors keep their footing
Researchers at the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) and MIT have developed pop-up shoe grips, inspired by snake skin, that can increase friction between the shoe and the ground. The assistive grips could be used, among other things, to reduce the risk of falling among older adults. (2020-06-01)

NASA looks at Inland Rainfall from Post Tropical Cyclone Bertha
NASA's GPM core satellite analyzed rainfall generated from post-tropical cyclone Bertha as it continues to move toward the Great Lakes. (2020-05-28)

'Lettere patenti' help assess intensity of historic central Italian earthquakes
Three hundred-year-old administrative documents from the Roman government, granting residents permission to repair damage to their buildings, can help modern-day seismologists calculate intensities for a notable sequence of earthquakes that struck central Italy in 1703. (2020-05-13)

NIH-funded study links early sleep problems to autism diagnosis among at-risk children
A small study funded by the National Institutes of Health suggests that sleep problems among children who have a sibling with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) may further raise the likelihood of an ASD diagnosis, compared to at-risk children who do not have difficulty sleeping. Previous research has shown that young children who have a sibling with ASD are at a higher risk for also being diagnosed with the condition. (2020-05-07)

NASA finds Tropical Storm Jeruto's displaced rainfall
NASA analyzed weakening Tropical Storm Jeruto's rainfall and found one small area of moderate rainfall displaced from the center, because of strong wind shear. (2020-04-16)

Risk aversion as a survival strategy in ants
Ants are excellent navigators and always find their way back to the nest. But how do they react when an obstacle or a predator blocks their path? An international team including Antoine Wystrach, a CNRS researcher has shown that ants are capable of changing their familiar route to avoid traps thanks to an aversive learning mechanism: by associating visual cues with negative experiences, they can memorize potentially dangerous routes. (2020-04-09)

Some flowers have learned to bounce back after injury
Some flowers have a remarkable and previously unknown ability to bounce back after injury, according to a new study. (2020-04-07)

NASA finds Tropical Storm Irondro's heavy rainfall displaced
NASA analyzed Tropical Storm Irondro's rainfall and found heaviest rainfall was being pushed far southeast of the center because of strong wind shear. (2020-04-06)

Vitamin D boosts chances of walking after hip fracture
Senior citizens who are not vitamin D deficient have a better chance of walking after hip fracture surgery, according to a Rutgers-led study. The findings in The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition suggest that vitamin D deficiency could limit mobility in older adults, said senior author Sue Shapses, a professor in the Department of Nutritional Sciences at the School of Environmental and Biological Sciences at Rutgers University-New Brunswick. (2020-03-17)

Virtual reality shows promise for early detection of MS balance problems
People with multiple sclerosis (MS) often have a greatly increased risk of falling and injuring themselves even when they feel they're able to walk normally. Now a team led by scientists from the UNC School of Medicine has demonstrated what could be a relatively easy method for the early detection of such problems, using virtual reality. (2020-03-11)

Safety zone saves giant moons from fatal plunge
Numerical simulations showed that the temperature gradient in the disk of gas around a young gas giant planet could play a critical role in the development of a satellite system dominated by a single large moon, similar to Titan around Saturn. Researchers found that dust in the circumplanetary disk can create a 'safety zone,' which keeps the moon from falling into the planet as the system evolves. (2020-03-09)

NASA measures rainfall rates in two American Samoa Tropical Cyclones
There are two tropical cyclones affecting American Samoa in the South Pacific Ocean on Feb. 21. Tropical Storm Vicky has triggered warnings, while Tropical Cyclone 18P continues to develop. The Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM satellite provided a look at the rainfall rates occurring in both storms. (2020-02-21)

NASA finds ex-Tropical Cyclone Uesi's rains affecting New Zealand
Although it is now an 'ex-tropical cyclone,' Uesi continues to generate some moderate rainfall, especially in its southern quadrant as it moves toward New Zealand. (2020-02-14)

Smoking rates falling in adults, but stroke survivors' smoking rates remain steady
While the rate of Americans who smoke tobacco has fallen steadily over the last two decades, the rate of stroke survivors who smoke has not changed significantly. Researchers say the persistent rate of smoking among stroke survivors, who should be motivated to quit, speaks to the highly addictive nature of nicotine and should spur clinicians to target smoking cessation after stroke. (2020-02-12)

NASA finds heavy rain southwest of tropical cyclone Uesi's center
The Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM satellite provided a look at the rainfall occurring within Tropical Cyclone Uesi and found heaviest rainfall in the southern quadrant of the storm. (2020-02-12)

Coincidences influence the onset and ending of ice ages
An analysis of the so called climate spectrum shows why the ice ages have not behaved precisely as the models predict. A large element of coincidence is involved when an ice age begins or ends, the analysis shows. Peter Ditlevsen from Physic of Ice, Climate and Earth at the Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen says the results imply we should maybe use a more conservative risk assessment then the one IPCC recommends. The result is now published in Climate Dynamics. (2020-02-11)

NASA examines Tropical Storm Uesi's heavy rainfall
NASA analyzed Tropical Storm Uesi's rainfall and found moderate to heavy rainfall around the storm's center and in a large band of thunderstorms south of the center. That heavy rainfall has triggered warnings for Vanuatu in the Southern Pacific Ocean. (2020-02-10)

New study provides criteria for good infant sleep for the first time
According to a new study, sleep problems among infants are very common and normally improve by the time the child reaches the age of 2. (2020-02-05)

Page 1 of 18 | 701 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.