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Accounting for the gaps in ancient food webs
Studying ancient food webs can help scientists reconstruct communities of species, many long extinct, and even use those insights to figure out how modern-day communities might change in the future. There's just one problem: only some species left enough of a trace for scientists to find eons later, leaving large gaps in the fossil record -- and researchers' ability to piece together the food webs from the past. (2021-01-14)

Scientists reveal mechanism that causes irritable bowel syndrome
KU Leuven researchers have identified the biological mechanism that explains why some people experience abdominal pain when they eat certain foods. The finding paves the way for more efficient treatment of irritable bowel syndrome and other food intolerances. The study, carried out in mice and humans, was published in Nature. (2021-01-13)

Food insufficiency linked to depression, anxiety during the COVID-19 pandemic
A new study published in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine found a 25% increase in food insufficiency during the COVID-19 pandemic. Food insufficiency, the most extreme form of food insecurity, occurs when families do not have enough food to eat. Among the nationally representative sample of 63,674 adults in the US, Black and Latino Americans had over twice the risk of food insufficiency compared to White Americans. (2021-01-12)

How will SARS-CoV-2 severity change in the next decade?
What will the SARS-CoV-2 outbreak look like ten years from now as it passes from pandemic to endemic, maintained at a constant baseline level in populations without being fueled by outside infections? (2021-01-12)

New technology reveals fast and slow twitch muscle fibers respond differently to exercise
Scientists at the University of Copenhagen have performed the most in-depth analysis of fast and slow twitch muscle fibers and the different ways they respond to exercise. Their novel approach uses large scale protein analysis of freeze-dried muscle samples, which opens the door for new analyses of muscle samples that are located in freezers around the world. (2021-01-12)

Research explains why crocodiles have changed so little since the age of the dinosaurs
New research by scientists at the University of Bristol explains how a 'stop-start' pattern of evolution, governed by environmental change, could explain why crocodiles have changed so little since the age of the dinosaurs. (2021-01-07)

Study finds rising rates of food insecurity among older adults
From 2007 to 2016, food insecurity -- or limited access to nutritious foods because of a lack of financial resources -- increased significantly from 5.5% to 12.4% among older US adults, and the increase was more pronounced among individuals with lower income. The findings come from a study published in the Journal of the American Geriatric Society. (2021-01-06)

Protecting the global food supply chain
The University of Delaware's Kyle Davis led a collaborative effort to research how to protect food chains from environmental shocks--everything from floods, droughts, and extreme heat to other phenomena like natural hazards, pests, disease, algal blooms, and coral bleaching. (2021-01-05)

Experts agree on new global definition of 'fermented foods'
Interdisciplinary scientists have come together to create the first international consensus definition of fermented foods. Their paper, published in Nature Reviews Gastroenterology & Hepatology, defines fermented foods as: ''foods made through desired microbial growth and enzymatic conversions of food components''. (2021-01-05)

Bacteriophage has important role in agriculture and aquaculture
Crop plants and animals can be infected by bacterial pathogens that reduce yield, cause food wastage, and carry human pathogens that spread disease on consumption. Bacteriophage can play an important role in microbial control (2021-01-04)

Global trial reveals life saving drug for acute myeloid leukemia
Results from a global trial across 148 sites in 23 countries, showing a 30 per cent improvement in survival in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML), significantly improving survival in older patients, over the age of 55, with the disease. AML is the most acute blood cancer in adults and its incidence increases with age, with a poor prognosis. (2020-12-23)

Three flavors are better than one -- in ice cream and supernova research
New research from Northwestern University has found that by studying all three ''flavors'' involved in a supernova, they've unlocked more clues as to how and why stars die. (2020-12-21)

Fertilizer runoff in streams and rivers can have cascading effects, analysis shows
Fertilizer pollution can have significant ripple effects in the food webs of streams and rivers, according to a new analysis of global data. (2020-12-17)

Childhood intervention can prevent 'deaths of despair'
Mortality rates among young adults are rising in the US due in part to 'deaths of despair' -- preventable deaths from suicide, drug overdoses and alcohol-related liver disease. An intensive childhood intervention program called Fast Track could help reduce these deaths by reducing risky behaviors in adolescence and young adulthood, finds new research from Duke University and the Conduct Problems Prevention Research Group. (2020-12-17)

Flexible and powerful electronics
A team of researchers led by the University of Tsukuba has developed a method for optimizing the electrical properties of carbon-based conductors by turning them into an ionic gel. This work may open the way for cheap, highly efficient sensors that can be printed on flexible surfaces. (2020-12-16)

Augmented reality visor makes cake taste moister, more delicious
Researchers have developed an augmented reality (AR) visor system that enables them to manipulate the light coming off food in such a way as to 'trick' people consuming the food into experiencing it as more or less moist, watery, or even delicious. (2020-12-15)

Study IDs four things that make people feel good about using chatbots
A recent study has identified four factors that predict user satisfaction with customer service chatbots. The study also found that a positive chatbot experience was associated with customer loyalty, highlighting the potential importance of the findings to corporate brands. (2020-12-15)

Discovering gaps in food safety practices of small Texas farms
A survey of small farmers in Texas identifies a significant gap in food safety protocols and resources, increasing the risk of produce contamination and foodborne illness. Very few small growers - most of whom are not required to follow federal food safety guidelines - have previous food safety training, according to the study. (2020-12-15)

Dartmouth researchers work to reduce child-directed food marketing on educational websites
A new article, published in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine by a by a team of researchers and advocates including Dartmouth faculty, asserts that current gaps in the regulation of commercial educational websites are exposing children to unhealthy food marketing. The group is working with major food companies and the USDA to limit these practices. (2020-12-10)

Roadmap offers solutions for future of food, global ag innovation
To deflect future world food crises created by climate change, a Cornell University-led international group has created a road map for global agricultural and food systems innovation. (2020-12-10)

Nutrigenomics: new frontiers
Plant omics and food engineering offer novel perspectives and value to sustainable agriculture and ecological sciences (2020-12-10)

A recipe for protein footprinting
By publishing their method in the journal Nature Protocols, chemists have opened doors for fellow scientists to better address research questions related to Alzheimer's disease, the COVID-19 pandemic and more. (2020-12-07)

Household-grown food leads to improved health for children
Children grow taller in rural households where their mothers are supported to grow their own food - according to new research from the University of East Anglia (UEA). The research, which looked at households in low- and middle-income countries, showed growing their own food helped mothers to prevent stunting, wasting and underweight in their children. Their children's food was more varied, meaning they had access to different classes of food nutrients. (2020-12-03)

Study reveals unintended impact of conversation policies
New research involving the University of East Anglia (UEA) shows how conservation polices can avoid having unintended consequences for local ecosystems and people. The research, conducted by scientists at the Stanford Center for Ocean Solutions (COS) and University of Hawai'i at Mānoa, with partners in Palau and economists in Italy and the UK, shows that the PNMS policies which restrict industrial offshore fishing could drive up offshore fish prices and, in turn, increase tourists' consumption of reef fish. (2020-11-30)

Link found between drought and HIV among women in less-developed countries
Lehigh University Professor Kelly Austin explores the consequences of drought and lack of environmental resources on women in less-developed countries. The research shows the direct and indirect associations to women's percentage of HIV. (2020-11-30)

Bacteria colonies invade new territories without traffic jams -- how?
An international collaboration between researchers at the Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Oxford University, and University of Sheffield has revealed that colonies of slow moving bacteria can expand significantly quicker than their fast moving counterparts - and how. The result is now published in Nature Physics. (2020-11-27)

Hormone found to switch off hunger could help tackle obesity
A hormone that can suppress food intake and increase the feeling of fullness in mice has shown similar results in humans and non-human primates, says a new study published today in eLife. (2020-11-24)

Pesticide deadly to bees now easily detected in honey
A common insecticide that is a major hazard for honeybees is now effectively detected in honey thanks to a simple new method. (2020-11-24)

COVID19 A research of Politecnico di Milano discovering the secrets of viral sequences
Use of an algorithm for computing viral mutations homogeneously across sources, using cloud computing. (2020-11-23)

New non-invasive technology could spot early signs of motor disorders in babies
Imperial College London scientists have created the world's first non-invasive way to map how baby movements are generated on a neuronal level. (2020-11-20)

College students are less food insecure than non-students
College students are significantly less likely to be food insecure than non-students in the same age group, according to a new study from the University of Illinois. (2020-11-19)

The timeless, complimentary taste of oysters and champagne -- explained
Matching prices aren't the only reason oysters and champagne pair so well. According to a study published by the University of Copenhagen today, an uncanny umami synergy makes the combination of yeast-brewed bubbly and fresh molluscs a match made in heaven for some. Ironically, the new knowledge could help us consume more vegetables in the future. (2020-11-18)

Migrating animals 'live fast and die young'
Animals that migrate 'live fast and die young', new research shows. (2020-11-17)

Cosmic flashes come in all different sizes
By studying the site of a spectacular stellar explosion seen in April 2020, a Chalmers-led team of scientists have used four European radio telescopes to confirm that astronomy's most exciting puzzle is about to be solved. Fast radio bursts, unpredictable millisecond-long radio signals seen at huge distances across the universe, are generated by extreme stars called magnetars - and are astonishingly diverse in brightness. (2020-11-16)

Changes to the brain's reward system may drive overeating in mice
A combination of innate differences and diet-induced changes to the reward system may predispose some mice to overeat, according to research recently published in JNeurosci. (2020-11-16)

Nearly one in five parents of food-allergic children are bullied
A new study being presented at this year's virtual American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI) Annual Scientific Meeting shows that nearly one in five parents of food-allergic kids are the target of bullying by a multitude of sources. (2020-11-13)

Food allergies take a greater emotional toll on Asian families
A new study being presented at this year's virtual American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology Annual Scientific Meeting reveals the impact on food allergy quality of life (FAQOL) for Asian patients and their parents is significantly higher than for other races. (2020-11-13)

Diet affects skin gene expression in both healthy and atopic dogs
Differences in skin gene expression were observed between healthy and atopic Staffordshire Bull Terriers as well as between dogs that ate either dry food or raw food. Raw food appeared to activate the skin's immune system as well as the expression of genes that increase antioxidant production or have anti-inflammatory effects. (2020-11-13)

Convenient antioxidant capacity measurement of food
Japanese researchers have developed a system to quickly and easily measure the antioxidant capacity of food. The new electrochemical system uses Bicontinuous Microemulsion (BME), where a mixture of water and oil is gelated and integrated with a sheet-type electrode. This system can easily be used by anyone anywhere and is expected to be used for quality control in the production, manufacturing and sale of food products. (2020-11-12)

Some U.S. states hit harder by COVID-19 food insecurity
Food insecurity in America is reaching an all-time high during the COVID-19 pandemic. But large regional differences exist in the severity of the impact. (2020-11-12)

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